Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

September 29 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Lost View

In a view that is unlikely to ever be replicated, Mies van der Rohe's iconic IBM Building rises above the Chicago River at dusk. It was his last American building and he died in 1969 before its completion.

This view was only available for a few short months in 2005 after the old Sun-Times building was razed to make room for the new Trump Tower. I have serious regrets that I didn't spend more time shooting the exposed IBM that summer. Now the Trump Tower dominates this scene and obscures the simpler beauty of van der Rohe's work.

Reposted bypaszczaczek paszczaczek

July 18 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Crack The Surface - Episode 1 - The first in a series of short documentaries focusing on the culture of Urban Exploring. In this episode we follow those who risk it all to access and infiltrate closed and forgotten spaces.

----------------------------------------------
// oAnth

see other episodes via http://www.silentuk.com/
Reposted fromdelix delix

May 29 2011

02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01

May 16 2011

02mydafsoup-01

May 11 2011

May 04 2011

4541 a02e

stellavista:

kryz:

Skyscraper project Friedrichstraße, Berlin (unbuilt) by Mies van der Rohe, 1921

 marveled at this (and the model) at bauhaus archiv. If this would have been built, the nazis might have never had a chance. They would have simply exploded!

Reposted fromjhnbrssndn jhnbrssndn

April 18 2011

02mydafsoup-01

March 25 2011

02mydafsoup-01
5164 5bda 500

plandrea:

Happy Birthday, Manhattan Street Grid!

Two hundred years ago today, city commissioners certified the Manhattan street grid, spurring development by ensuring 7 miles of regular street access.

When the 2000-block grid was approved, urbanized Manhattan ended at Greenwich Village. Areas north were farmland and unsettled areas.

When the street grid was designed, planners anticipated that New York, then a city of 40,000 people, would grow up to 34th Street and have a population of 400,000 over the next 50 years. By 1860, Manhattan had already grown to 800,000 and continued to grow uptown. 

The street grid was chosen because officials thought that the consistent 90 degree angles, dissimilar from the narrow crooked streets downtown, would discourage the spread of fire and disease.

The grid made the city more egalitarian, carving out lots (mostly 25 by 100 feet) available for purchase. Roland Barthes, the 20th-century French philosopher, wrote: “This is the purpose of New York’s geometry. That each individual should be poetically the owner of the capital of the world.”

Today, City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden celebrates the block: “The 200-foot-long block is short enough to provide continuous diversity for the pedestrian, and the tradition of framing out the grid by building to the street-wall makes New York streets walkable and vibrant.” 

Quotes from NYT

March 07 2011

Salottobuono > projects > DREAMING MILANO

"…Thinking about the internal boundaries of the city, about its “inner front”, means to catch the opportunity of an expansion different from the peripheral one: with other relationships between open spaces and built masses, a different density, a different intensity, proper typologies.
It means also to reflect on the natural environment, not as a landscape fragment romantically survived to urbanization anymore, but as a “productive graft”, structuring space and metropolitan luxury. Cultivated place instead of social diaphragm.

The deep differences between the metropolitan boundaries and the agricultural land could exacerbate, rather than recompose in a homogeneous tissue.

On the inner edge of the contemporary city, high-speed drifting fragments of frenetic urbanity float free from intrinsic relations with the traditional organization of the built environment…"
Reposted fromrobertogreco robertogreco
6274 65c3

One of several illustrations from Salottobuono’s DREAMING MILANO

Reposted fromrobertogreco robertogreco
02mydafsoup-01

March 06 2011

March 05 2011

9907 26aa

afuzz:

Linda Vista Theatre, Mexico City

S.C. Lee, architect

Description: As built the circular front kiosk and tower perform the function of advertising the theatre as a destination and display the posters for shows to passersby.

Date: 1942

Reposted fromStellaVista StellaVista
1102 34a5 500

walkingliberty:

I would consider relocating to Jackson if it meant I could work in this building.

decoarchitecture:

Greyhound Bus Station, Jackson, Mississippi
from Roadside Architecture: Greyhound Bus Stations

Side view of Jackson’s old bus station — now an architecture firm’s office. The architect saved the building!

From the site:

The Jackson station was built from 1937-1938. This is the only station that Arrasmith designed with a structural glass faced exterior. Originally, the interior had a coffee shop with a horseshoe-shaped counter. The men’s room had a shower, while the women’s room had a bath tub. It was condemned when architect Robert Parker Adams bought the building in 1988. He restored it as office space for his architectural firm. This station is also part of desegregation history. Freedom Riders were arrested here for using white restrooms and waiting rooms.

Reposted fromjohnstaedler johnstaedler

March 03 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Amiens Cathedral, 1220-1288 – French gothic carved wood chair stalls
Original Collection: Arthur Peck Photograph Collection (P99)

Item Number: P099_A_144

Restrictions: Permission to use must be obtained from the OSU Archives.

Click here to view our digital collections.

Click here to view Oregon State University's other digital collections.

We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons; however, certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version may apply. To read more about what “no known restrictions” means, please visit the OSU Archives website.
02mydafsoup-01
Stratham Park, [NH] – [Herts? Hants?]
Original Collection: Arthur Peck Photograph Collection (P99)

Item Number: P099_D_346

Restrictions: Permission to use must be obtained from the OSU Archives.

Click here to view our digital collections.

Click here to view Oregon State University's other digital collections.

We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons; however, certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version may apply. To read more about what “no known restrictions” means, please visit the OSU Archives website.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl