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May 09 2011

The Garden of Forking Paths Outdoor Sculpture Project

The Garden of Forking Paths is the title of an outdoor sculpture project, which the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst is staging on the Blum family estate in Samstagern near Zürich, Switzerland. The exhibition, curated by the Migros Museum’s director Heike Munder, is presented in two parts. This video shows the opening of the first part of the project, and Heike Munder talks about the concept of the exhibition and the works on display.

The first part of “The Garden of Forking Paths” presents works by the artists Pablo Bronstein, Liz Craft, Fabian Marti, Peter Regli, and Thiago Rocha Pitta. Pablo Bronstein has created a pavilion that serves as the performance venue for the aria “Qui del Sol gl’infausti lampi” from the opera “Agar et Ismaele Esiliati by Italian composer Alessandro Scarlatti (click here to watch the performance). Liz Craft has conceived a garden house with a stairway to heaven (“Snake House”), while Fabian Marti has built a psychedelic hothouse (“Heroic Dose”). Finally, there’s Peter Regli’s disproportionally large snowman made of white marble (“Reality Hacking No. 270″), and Thiago Rocha Pitta’s “Monument to the Continental Drift”, a sail for the landscape.

The second part of the show opens the 10th July 2011 with additional works by Ida Ekblad, Geoffrey Farmer, Kerstin Kartscher, and Ragnar Kjartansson. The sculpture project “The Garden of Forking Paths” is a guest on the Froh Ussicht estate, owned by the Blum family in Samstagern (Zürich). Since 2008, Martin Blum presents art projects on his farmland under the name Froh Ussicht.

The Garden of Forking Paths Outdoor Sculpture Project, Opening, May 1, 2011.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.

Photo set on Flickr:

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May 05 2011

Pablo Bronstein: Teatro Alessandro Scarlatti / Performance

For The Garden of Forking Paths, an outdoor sculpture project of the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Argentinian artist Pablo Bronstein built the world’s smallest opera house on a hill near a farm near Zurich, Switzerland. Only 5 persons a time can listen to an aria from an opera by Alessandro Scarlatti.

The Garden of Forking Paths is a guest on the Froh Ussicht estate, owned by the Blum family in Samstagern (Zürich). Under the name Froh Ussicht, Martin Blum presents since 2008 art projects on his farmland. More about the sculpture exhibition and an interview with the curator of the project and director of the Migros Museum, Heike Munder, is coming soon. More information about Pablo Bronstein’s work after the jump.

Pablo Bronstein’s “Performance of a Single Aria by Alessandro Scarlatti” takes place at the following dates: June 11 and 12, July 10, August 14, September 4, and October 2 and 30, 2011.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.

Excerpt from the leaflet:
“In his drawings, models and installations, Pablo Bronstein (born 1977, Buenos Aires, Argentina) takes on architectural history and brings architectonic ideas from previous eras – in this instance, those of the 18th century – into the present. It is not only stylistic questions concerning the façade and construction that play a role here, so too do the mechanisms of power, emotion, longing and interaction that, in architecture, can also be manifested in an absurd manner and become points of refe rence and investigation. Bronstein’s constructions become stages for their user, and through performative moments extend the architectonic into the human.

The Pavilion, which has been created for the sculpture project, serves as the performance venue for the aria Qui del Sol gl‘infausti lampi from the opera Agar et Ismaele Esiliati (1684) by Italian composer Alessandro Scarlatti (1660–1725). With his pavilion offering space for just a few spectators, Bronstein highlights the exclusivity and “absurdity” of the Baroque garden design and, in a way quite his own, demonstrates how far “decadence” and here architecture too, always contains exclusive moments. Standing on the pavilion balcony the spectator has an overview of the landscape and can feel like the “lord” of all he/she surveys.”


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