Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

February 21 2013

Martin Kippenberger: Sehr Gut Very Good / Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin

In 2013 Martin Kippenberger, the enfant terrible of the German art scene, would have celebrated his 60th birthday. On this occasion, Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin is dedicating a special exhibition to the artist, who died in 1997 due to an excessive life. The show characterizes Martin Kippenberger as an artist, whose work and life cannot be separated from one another, and as an artist, who is considered one of the most significant of his generation. After the last major Martin Kippenberger retrospective entitled The Problem Perspective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 2009, the exhibition Martin Kippenberger: Sehr Gut | Very Good at Hamburger Bahnhof is another attempt to approach the life and work of Martin Kippenberger. Kippenberger’s works are exhibited at several places in the building. On display are works such as the painting Paris Bar (1993), and the wall sculpture Zuerst die Füsse (1991) (the infamous crucified frog). In this video, curator Britta Schmitz talks about the artist and the exhibition. The exhibition runs until August 18, 2013.

Martin Kippenberger: Sehr Gut | Very Good / Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin. Press preview, February 21, 2013. Video by Frantisek Zachoval.

Watch also: Martin Kippenberger: The Problem Perspective / Museum of Modern Art MoMA, New York.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Press release:

In 2013 Martin Kippenberger would have celebrated his 60th birthday – that is, had he not died in 1997 due to an excessive life. At several places in the building, the Hamburger Bahnhof currently exhibits an artist whose work and life cannot be separated from one another – a painter, an actor, a writer, a musician, a drunkard, a dancer, a traveller, a charmer, an enfant terrible and self-producer – in short, an “exhibitionist” as he called himself and an artist who today is considered one of the most significant of his generation. The permeation of personality and oeuvre, as well as the incredible variety of his artistic production, is now presented in its entire spectrum. “Martin Kippenberger: sehr gut | very good” however does not intend to be a retrospective, but rather an approximation of both the private and public persona of the artist Martin Kippenberger.

martin-kippenberger-022113

Even if Kippenberger only spent a few years in West-Berlin (1978-1981), it was here that he developed important topics of his artistic cosmos. Hence he announced that “Berlin needed a new coat of paint” and made a name for himself as a short-term co-owner of the legendary punk club SO36 and operator of the “Büro Kippenberger.” Besides performing as a musician in the band “Luxus” or respectively as an actor, he also once created for Claudia Skoda a floor collage as a catwalk for her Kreuzberg studio that he made from 1,300 photos from the fashion designer’s environment. For the duration of the exhibition, the collage is shown in the historic passage in the East Wing. With the series “Uno di voi, un tedesco in Firenze” (1976-1977) he had still performed as a painter using oil and canvas, but in Berlin he traded large parts of this series for free food and drinks at the legendary Paris Bar (which he also then painted). With his series “Lieber Maler, Male mir” (1981) he shortly thereafter subverted the cliché of the genius painter by ordering large-format images from a movie poster painter. In spite of public indignations that Kippenberger repeatedly caused, with works such as “Martin, ab in die Ecke und schäm dich” (1989) he managed to distil something positive.

A multiple installation – often referred to as “white paintings” (1991) and so far rarely shown – can be seen on the main building’s first floor: eleven white canvases that are embedded into the wall, virtually becoming one with it. Upon approaching the work one recognises glossy children’s handwriting on the images, which quasi certifies Kippenberger’s work by grading it throughout with the mark “very good” – of course on request of the artist. Yet, “Martin Kippenberger: sehr gut | very good” does not only refer to the white paintings but also to a magazine Kippenberger published in 1978 called “sehr gut. very good.”

In the midst of all this irony however the exhibition also reveals a human being who needed to combat his sickness through art. Kippenberger painted himself in the pose of the shipwrecked from Théodore Géricaults famous painting from 1819: bloated, aged, exhausted. Self-portrayal is in fact an essential part of his work and life, which is why there is an abundance of photographs and in particular self-portraits. A selection of photographs allows for a differentiated perspective of Kippenberger – thirty years after he left Berlin: “Art is always only looked at in retrospect anyway… I would say that the period is twenty years. […] Whatever the people will or will not continue to talk about me is what matters. Whether I spread good fun or not. And so what I’m working on is that the people will be able to say: Kippenberger was good fun!”

Curated by Udo Kittelmann and Britta Schmitz, Co-Curator: Miriam Halwani.

PinterestShare

January 02 2013

Sandra Peters: Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical / Aanant & Zoo, Berlin

The exhibition Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical by Sandra Peters at the gallery Aanant & Zoo in Berlin (Germany) presents in the centre a 140 cm high cube. This piece and another works refer to the concept of space from architect Rudolph Schindler. Slide projections show two of his most important buildings of the twenties: his own house from 1921, and the “How House” from 1925. The open form of the cube and variations of smaller cubes relate to the ceiling structure of the interior of the “How House”. The diagonal in Schindler‘s house enlarges and opens the space, giving the place a direction, and takes on the movement of the two central axes of the building. The horizontals and verticals of the conventional room structure are clearly and tangibly vitalised through the dynamic diagonal. In this video the curator and director of the gallery, Alexander Hahn, talks about the background of the show. Sandra Peters talks in detail about the concept of the exhibition. The show runs until January 26, 2013.

Sandra Peters was born in Bonn (Germany) in 1969. The artist lives and works in Berlin. Sandra Peters studied art at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts (Germany). Her solo exhibitions include: Interplay, Kunstsaele Berlin, (2011); Bilateral – Diagonal, Y8 Hamburg, (2011); Brick-structure, Villa Aichele, Lörrach (2009); Modification – constantly climbing stones, Kunstverein Ruhr, Essen, (2009); Contemporary drawing V (with Katja Eckert & Karim Noureldin), Kunstmuseum Bonn (2007); Drawings on tracing paper, Villa Aichele, Lörrach (2007); Collage drawings, Königstein, Königstein Sachsen (2003).


Sandra Peters: Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical at Aanant & Zoo, Berlin (Germany). Interview with Sandra Peters, December 14, 2012. Video by Frantisek Zachoval.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Official PR:

Sandra Peters “Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical”
15.12.2012 — 26.01.2013

Sometimes a simple form is enough to make a complex structure experienceable and create an unexpected order between the viewer, work and space. Aanant & Zoo is pleased to present the exhibition “Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical” by Sandra Peters from 15. December 2012 to 26. January 2013.

In the centre of „Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical“ is an open, 140 cm high cube. Its surfaces are divided by orthogonal struts in such a way that the points at which the struts meet each other form a diagonal. The diagonal divides each of the surfaces into two unequal halves, and as a result produces a vague impression of inconclusiveness and movement. The struts of the different surfaces, lying next to and behind one another, cross each other and create new structures depending on the angle from which they are viewed. With every step the viewer takes, the grid and lines of the structure change. The logical form, in all its clarity, makes an ephemeral game of the experience. Cube, viewer and space (the space that surrounds the work, as well as the space produced in the work) are interdependent and connect the form to the here and now.

The exhibited cube depicts one of the 8 to the power of 6 possibilities (within the same diagonal configuration) to connect the cube‘s surfaces. The concrete experience is shaped and held together by a concept that implies 262144 alternative permutations.

In all of the pieces shown in „Bilateral, Diagonal, Cubical“, Peters selectively relates to the concept of space from Rudolph Schindler. Slide projections show two of his most important buildings of the twenties: his own house from 1921, and the “How House” from 1925. The slightly adjusted diagonal, which determines Peters‘ open cube, refers to the ceiling structure of the interior of the “How House”. The diagonal in Schindler‘s house enlarges and opens the space, giving the place a direction, and takes on the movement of the two central axes of the building. The horizontals and verticals of the conventional room structure are clearly and tangibly vitalised through the dynamic diagonal. In Peters‘ open cube, the architectonic dynamization meets the clear and sober language of Minimal and Conceptual Art.

The ambivalence between work and concept, planned and experienced space, sculpture and architecture, is focussed on in the smaller cubes exhibited in the front room. The cubes are placed diagonally to each other, grouped as an ensemble, which is evocative of architectural models, prototypes and the works of Sol LeWitt. Another important group of works translates the structure of the façade of the “How House” into precise constellations of individual surfaces that are shifted against each other. The architectonic form is reduced to a concentrated relief, to an essence of the house‘s appearance: room – cube, cube – surface.

Lukas Töpfer, December 2012

sandra-peters-111412

PinterestShare

September 03 2012

Wael Shawky: Al Araba Al Madfuna / KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin / Interview

The Egyptian artist Wael Shawky has created a new, large-scale work for his current solo exhibition entitled Al Araba Al Madfuna at KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin. The solo show is part of the Ernst Schering Foundation Art Award 2011 that he won. Wael Shawky is known for the reenactment of historic events with children and marionettes.

Wael Shawky was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1971. He studied at The University of Alexandria, followed by an MFA at the University of Pennsylvania in 2000. He received numerous awards and participated in major group shows such as the Venice Biennale (2003), the Santa Fe Biennial (2008), and Documenta 13 in Kassel (2012). Wael Shawky lives and works in Alexandria.

In this video, Wael Shawky talks about his exhibition in Berlin and his work in general. The exhibition Al Araba Al Madfuna at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin runs until October 21, 2012.

Wael Shawky: Al Araba Al Madfuna at KW Institute for Contemporary Art – Kunst-Werke Berlin e. V. Interview with Wael Shawky, August 24, 2012. Video: Frantisek Zachoval.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Share


July 18 2012

02mydafsoup-01
"Die Griechen ?" - "Die Berliner!"

... wozu Pigor / Eichhorn bereits 2009 weitsichtig Stellung nahmen.

July 09 2012

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms / Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms at the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin is the last exhibition in Deutsche Guggenheim’s commission program. For this show, Mexican-born artist Gabriel Orozco has created sculptural and photographic installations from the rubble he gathered on two sites in New York and in Baja California, Mexico.

The objects that are displayed on a platform are detritus that Gabriel Orozco gathered at a playing field in New York City. When picking up a boomerang, he noticed the small pieces of rubbish that were lying on the surface of the playing field: rubber bands, labels, coins, etc. He started to collect and categorize them. Gabriel Orozco gave the work the name Astroturf Constellation, referencing the Astroturf of the playing field on Pier 40 in New York.

The second installation is entitled Sandstars. The objects that are spread out on the floor of the Deutsche Guggenheim’s exhibition space come from a protected coastal biosphere and wildlife reserve in Isla Arena, Mexico. This place is also the endpoint of flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean: glass bottles, lightbulbs, hard hats, stones, etc. Gabriel Orozco has been there before. From the sands of the wildlife reserve he extracted the whale skeleton that formed the sculpture Mobile Matrix (2006). Sandstars consists of 1,200 objects that now form a monumental sculptural carpet on the gallery floor.

The sculptural work is accompanied by large-scale gridded photographs of images of the individual objects. Gabriel Orozco photographed the objects under natural lighting conditions in his studio and then arranged them according to their material, color, size, etc.

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is the 18th and final project in the Deutsche Guggenheim’s commission program that started in 1997. Among the participating artists of the program are John Baldessari, Hanne Darboven, William Kentridge, Jeff Koons, Gerhard Richter, James Rosenquist, Andreas Slominski, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Bill Viola, Phoebe Washburn, Lawrence Weiner, Jeff Wall, and Rachel Whiteread.

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is curated by Nancy Spector (Deputy Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Museum) and Joan Young (Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum). This video provides you with a tour of the exhibition during the press preview, an introduction to the exhibition by Joan Young, and some atmospheric shots of the opening reception.

More information about the exhibition is also available in the current issue of DB Artmag.

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms. Solo exhibition at Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin. Interview with Joan Young (Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum). Press preview and opening reception, July 5, 2012.

PS: In 2010, the Kunstmuseum Basel presented a major survey of the work of Gabriel Orozco: Gabriel Orozco Retrospective at Kunstmuseum Basel. Click here for the related video.

PPS: Click here to see a video including a cover version of Gabriel Orozco’s famous work La D.S. (a sliced silver Citroën DS) by Aleksandra Mir.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:


Share


May 18 2012

7th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art

The Berlin Biennale was founded in order to promote contemporary art in Berlin. In 1998 the first Berlin Biennale took place. Since 2004, KW Institute for Contemporary Art has been the supporting organization of the Berlin Biennale.

The 7th Berlin Biennale, curated by the Polish artist Artur Żmijewski has its focus on social and political issues. Żmijewski is particularly interested in the power of art and its relation to politics.

The Berlin Biennale is organized by KW Institute for Contemporary Art and funded by the Kulturstiftung des Bundes (German Federal Cultural Foundation). The 7th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art in Berlin / Germany runs until July 1, 2012.

7th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, opening reception, April 26, 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Share


May 11 2012

Anthony McCall: Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture / Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin

With Anthony McCall: Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture, Berlin’s museum for contemporary art, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart presents the largest exhibition of McCall’s work to date. The museum presents a selection of Anthony McCall’s works from the past ten years. The historic central hall of the former railway station has been transformed into a cinema space, filled only with the the haze and the veils of light that are typical for McCalls unique light installations, the so-called solid light films.

New York-based artist Anthony McCall was born in 1946 in St Paul’s Cray, England. He was a key figure in the avant-garde London Film-makers Co-operative in the 1970s. He moved to New York in 1973 and developed his solid light film series, projections in darkened, haze-filled rooms, that create an illusion of three-dimensional shapes. At the end of the 1970s, Anthony McCall stopped making art, but over 20 years later, he continued his work on the solid light series., this time using new technology such as computer animation and digital projection. The exhibition, curated by Henriette Huldisch, has been made possible by the Verein der Freunde der Nationalgalerie.

Anthony McCall: Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture / Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin . Opening reception, April 19, 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

Anthony McCall: Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture / Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Share


May 05 2012

Roman Ondák: do not walk outside this area / Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin

With the exhibition “do not walk outside this area”, the Slovakian artist Roman Ondák is realizing his project for the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin as Deutsche Bank’s “Artist of the Year”. Air travelers who have ever sat on the window seat of an aircraft near the wing, know the warning, that is written on the deck: “do not walk outside this area.” If you then wondered how it is, walking on the wing of an airplane, now you have the occasion to do so. The centerpiece of Roman Ondák’s show at the Deutsche Guggenheim is a wing of a Boeing 737-500 airliner, transformed into a catwalk.

In addition to this walkable sculpture, the show presents works on paper and installation based on the subject of traveling in two exhibition rooms. Among the works is for example a series of seven postcards and sixteen fictitious newspaper articles made in 2010 for the exhibition Un’Espressione Geografica in the renowned Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin, titled Balancing at the Toe of the Boot. The aforementioned wing connects two exhibition rooms like a bridge.

Roman Ondák: do not walk outside this area / Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin. Opening reception, April 25, 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

Watch also:

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Share


May 02 2012

Gallery Weekend Berlin 2012

Berlin may not have a “big” international art fair any more (Art Forum Berlin, R.I.P.), but the galleries in Berlin seem to be more enthusiastic about their Gallery Weekend anyway. With 51 galleries offically participating and many more satelliting, it’s impossible to check out all shows. The above video by our correspondent Astrid Gleichmann shows a small selection of the program. It shows Jenny Holzer and Anthony McCall at Sprüth Magers Gallery, Leo Gabin at Peres Projects, Andreas Golder at Michael Fuchs Galerie, and Martin Eder at Galerie Eigen + Art.

Gallery Weekend Berlin 2012. Berlin, Germany, April 28, 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Share


April 22 2012

02mydafsoup-01

April 20 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Karl-Marx-Allee Shops

Where there had been ruins of a an area of densely populated, working class housing, the East Germans build what they styled "The first socialist street". It replaced the "Große Frankfurter Straße" and from 1949 to 1961 was known as "Stalin Allee".

Designed in the so-called wedding-cake style, the socialist classicism of the Soviet Union, the avenue, which is 292 feet wide and nearly 1¼ miles long, is lined with monumental eight-storey buildings containing spacious and luxurious apartments for workers, as well as shops, restaurants, cafés, a tourist hotel, the "Berolina", and the "International" cinema.
Reposted fromvintagephotography vintagephotography
02mydafsoup-01

Karl Marx Allee

Where there had been ruins of a an area of densely populated, working class housing, the East Germans build what they styled "The first socialist street". It replaced the "Große Frankfurter Straße" and from 1949 to 1961 was known as "Stalin Allee".

Designed in the so-called wedding-cake style, the socialist classicism of the Soviet Union, the avenue, which is 292 feet wide and nearly 1¼ miles long, is lined with monumental eight-storey buildings containing spacious and luxurious apartments for workers, as well as shops, restaurants, cafés, a tourist hotel and an enormous cinema (the International), At each end are dual towers at Frankfurter Tor (in the middle distance) and Strausberger Platz.

Reposted fromvintagephotography vintagephotography
02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01

Bomb Damage

By the summer of 1969 much building work remained to be done in East Berlin to repair the damage of the Second World War bombing.

Reposted fromvintagephotography vintagephotography

April 06 2012

Bundesratsinitiative gegen W-LAN-Störerhaftung

Die Stadt Berlin plant ein offenes und kostenloses W-LAN für alle. Weil die Frage der Haftung des Betreibers von (offenen) W-LANs für Urheberrechtsverletzungen durch Nutzer unklar und juristisch umstritten ist, möchte Berlin auf  eine gesetzliche Regelung hinwirken, damit Betreiber wie Nachbarschaftsinitiativen, lokale Funkdatennetze oder Kommunen einen freien WLAN-Zugang anbieten können, ohne haftungsrechtliche Risiken einzugehen.

Das ist grundsätzlich sehr zu begrüßen, allerdings stört mich an dem Antragstext, der diesbezüglich im Berliner Abgeordnetenhaus eingebracht wurde, die Einschränkung, dass erforderliche technische Schutzmaßnahmen ihrem Zweck entsprechend wirksam gegen eine unbefugte Drittnutzung des Zugangs eingesetzt werden müssen. Was darunter im Kontext offener und kostenloser W-LANs zu verstehen ist, ist mir jedenfalls unklar. Vermutlich sind Portsperren und Proxyserver-Lösungen gemeint.

Der Text spricht außerdem von einer Haftung nach dem Telemediengesetz (TMG). Diese Formulierung ist juristisch unzutreffend, denn das TMG enthält keine haftungsbegründenden Vorschriften, sondern nur haftungsbeschränkende Normen. Die Haftung richtet sich allein nach dem Urheberrechtsgesetz in Kombination mit den von der Rechtsprechung entwickelten Grundsätzen der sog. Störerhaftung.

Ähnliche Initiativen gibt es derzeit auch in der Hamburger und der Bremer Bürgerschaft. In Bremen hat die SPD-Fraktion einen Antrag “Rechtssicherheit für Anbieter von freiem Internet” eingebracht, der noch etwas progressiver klingt als der aus Berlin. In dem Antrag wird gefordert, WLAN-Betreiber gesetzlich einem Access-Provider gleichzustellen und im Urheberrecht auf Änderungen hinzuwirken, die klare Voraussetzungen für das Vorliegen von Störerhaftung schaffen, wobei nach Möglichkeit insbesondere nichtgewerbliche WLAN- Betreiber von einer entsprechenden Haftung freigestellt werden sollen.

Sollte es tatsächlich zu einer entsprechenden Gesetzesinitiative über den Bundesrat kommen, ist allerdings mit heftigem lobbyistischen Gegenwind der Rechteinhaber zu rechnen, deren politischer Einfluss bekanntlich enorm ist.

March 14 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Berlin Rally #FREEBRADLEYMANNING 15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor #freebrad #wikileaks | Freiheit für Bradley Manning





GUILTY OF TELLING THE TRUTH. FREE BRADLEY MANNING!


Schuldig die Wahrheit ans Licht gebracht zu haben.



15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor, Pariser Platz Rückseite der Amerikanischen Botschaft. Rally for Bradley Manning in Berlin.





Reposted bywikileakslydschi

February 13 2012

Julius von Bismarck: Punishment I / Alexander Levy Gallery, Berlin

Gallery LEVY Berlin re-opens as Alexander Levy Gallery with a solo exhibition with new works by Julius von Bismarck, a young Berlin-based artist who became famous with his “Image Fulgurator“. For his new work, “Punishment I”, Julius von Bismarck went on a journey through Switzerland, South America and the U.S. armed with a whip. By whipping nature, he is on one hand defying nature’s power, and on the other hand rebels against socialization (click here for more info and the press release).

Julius von Bismarck: Punishment I, Alexander Levy Gallery, Berlin / Germany. Opening reception, January 27 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

PS: See also: Julius von Bismarck, Benjamin Maus, Richard Wilhelmer: Fühlometer (Monumental Interactive Smiley).

PPS. Watch Julius von Bismarck whipping!

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

In January 2012 the alexander levy gallery, formerly LEVY BERLIN, will open under a new name after extensive renovations. Launched in September 2009 as a branch of the Hamburg gallery, the program has mainly focused on the promotion of young and experimental art. After two years, Alexander Levy will now expand this emphasis and the new alexander levy gallery will concentrate solely on the presentation of young artistic positions.

A first example of this updated approach can be seen on 27 January 2012 with a solo exhibition by Julius von Bismarck. Punishment I shows new works by the young progressive artist in the refurbished space. The title of the exhibition points to a pre-Christian legend that says that the Achaemenid King and Egyptian Pharaoh Xerxes had the strait at Hellespont punished with 300 lashes, after bridges that had been built on his order were destroyed by a storm shortly after construction.

Julius von Bismarck took up this anger allegorically for his new series of works. From October to December 2011 he went on a journey through Switzerland, South America and the United States armed with a whip. At impressive locations he plays with the rhetorical power of this traditional retaliation, whipping nature, defying its power, until he is exhausted. In a contemporary context, he thus rebels against socialization and, as a modern Sisyphus, questions value patterns which are conveyed to people today by societal constructs and authorities. The resulting evidence of these equally martial and meditative actions are collected in form of film footage, photographs and the whips in the context of Punishment I.

Julius von Bismarck, * 1983, has studied since 2009 with Olafur Eliasson at the Institut für Raumexperimente. In 2008 he won the Golden Nica of the Prix Ars Electronica with his work “Image Fulgurator”. Following numerous exhibitions at internationally renowned locations, he became the first artist to receive the Prix Ars Electronica from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

February 01 2012

Paweł Althamer: Almech at Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin / Finissage

Pawel Althamer’s exhibition “Almech” at Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin, Germany, was a work in progress. During the exhibition, Althamer and his team produced sculptures with the faces of visitors of the exhibition and staff members of the museum. On the last day of the show, all finished sculptures were on display. This video was shot at the Finissage of the exhibition and shows the sculptures and some of the visitors that were portrayed.

For more information about the show, a photo gallery, and a video including shots from the opening and an interview with the curator of the exhibition, Nat Trotman, click here!

Paweł Althamer: Almech at Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin. Finissage, January 14, 2012. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.

Related Articles:

December 15 2011

Tracing Mobility at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin

The exhibition Tracing Mobility at Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, Germany sets out to examine how electronic networks and mobile media are transforming our conceptions of time, space and distance.

The exhibition presents the positions of 16 international artists who trace the shifting terrain of global and local mobility, virtual and material movement. They use varying approaches to pursue the numerous questions of our present’s mobility: Where can we escape to when online- and offline worlds converge? What does the movement of a body in a landscape indicate when every point of the earth is within reach through the aid of digital technology? How do mobile devices and media alter our mindset and change our perception of time and space?

The exhibiting artists are: Frank Abbott (UK), Aram Bartholl (DE), Neal Beggs (UK/FR), Heath Bunting (UK), Janet Cardiff / George Bures Miller (CAN), Miles Chalcraft (UK/DE, Simon Faithfull (UK/DE), Yolande Harris (UK/NL), Folke Köbberling & Martin Kaltwasser (DE), Landon Mackenzie (CAN), Open_Sailing (FR/JP), plan b (Sophia New & Dan Belasco Rogers) (UK/DE), Esther Polak & Ivar van Bekkum (NL), Gordan Savicic (AT/NL) , Mark Selby (UK), and Michelle Teran (CAN/DE).

Tracing Mobility at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin. Opening reception, November 23, 2011. Video by Astrid Gleichmann.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.


November 23 2011

Yngve Holen: Sensitive to Detergent / Autocenter, Berlin

In this video, we attend the opening reception of Yngve Holen’s solo exhibition Sensitive to Detergent at Autocenter in Berlin, Germany.

Yngve Holen was born in 1982 in Braunschweig, Germany. The artist lives and works in Berlin. Holen studied architecture at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria and sculpture at the HfBK Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Yngve Holen’s recent solo exhibitions include Parasagittal Brain at Johan Berggren Gallery in Malmö, Sweden (2011) and Half Asleep to the 2010 Hot 1001 at Neue Alte Brücke in Frankfurt am Main. He has been participating in group exhibitions Based in Berlin at KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin (2011) and 21st Century at Chisenhale Gallery in London, among others.

Yngve Holen is also co-organizer of the club night Body Xerox and co-founder and editor of the online publishing platform XYM.

Autocenter is an independent exhibition space that was founded in 2001 by the artists Maik Schierloh and Joep van Liefland in an auto body shop in Berlin’s Friedrichshain district.

Yngve Holen: Sensitive to Detergent / Autocenter, Berlin. Opening, November 18, 2011. Video by Sergio Roger.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.


Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl