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September 13 2013

Four short links: 13 September 2013

  1. Fog Creek’s Remote Work PolicyIn the absence of new information, the assumption is that you’re producing. When you step outside the HQ work environment, you should flip that burden of proof. The burden is on you to show that you’re being productive. Is that because we don’t trust you? No. It’s because a few normal ways of staying involved (face time, informal chats, lunch) have been removed.
  2. Coder (GitHub) — a free, open source project that turns a Raspberry Pi into a simple platform that educators and parents can use to teach the basics of building for the web. New coders can craft small projects in HTML, CSS, and Javascript, right from the web browser.
  3. MillWheel (PDF) — a framework for building low-latency data-processing applications that is widely used at Google. Users specify a directed computation graph and application code for individual nodes, and the system manages persistent state and the continuous ���ow of records, all within the envelope of the framework’s fault-tolerance guarantees. From Google Research.
  4. Probabilistic Scraping of Plain Text Tablesthe method leverages topological understanding of tables, encodes it declaratively into a mixed integer/linear program, and integrates weak probabilistic signals to classify the whole table in one go (at sub second speeds). This method can be used for any kind of classification where you have strong logical constraints but noisy data.

February 11 2013

8972 1400
Les Chiffonniers du Caire - Documentaire Complet
Die Müllsammler von Kairo - vollständige Dokumentarfilmfassung

Disponible sur YouTube - http://youtu.be/SJR1O_Uj6EE



Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

September 06 2011

POLL: Obama Approval Ratings Plummet Ahead Of Jobs Speech


Obama worried

Voter approval of President Barack Obama has sunk to the lowest point of his presidency, with 51% of Americans disapproving of his job performance, according to a new NBC/WSJ poll released this morning.

As Obama prepares to deliver his new jobs proposal to Congress this week, he faces widening voter pessimism and doubts over his ability to deal with the economy. Only 37% of voters surveyed approve of his handling of the economy, and 70% believe the economy has not yet hit rock bottom. About 73% said they think the country is heading in the wrong direction.

The survey's most foreboding finding is that 54% of Americans think Obama faces long-term setbacks from which he is unlikely to recover — the same rating President George W. Bush received in the months after Hurricane Katrina.

The sort-of silver lining for Obama is that he still beats 2012 Republican frontrunners Rick Perry and Mitt Romney in head-to-head matchups — he leads Perry by five points, 47% to 42%, and Romney by one point, 46% to 45%.

But 44% say they'd probably vote for a generic Republican candidate over 40% who say they'd probably vote for Obama.

Perry takes the lead among 2012 GOP presidential contenders in the new WSJ/NBC poll, confirming other recent national polls that show the Texan as the clear frontrunner. The survey found Perry has 38% support among likely Republican voters, with Romney in second with 23% support.

Ron Paul came in third with 9%, while Michele Bachmann sunk to just 8% support, down from 16% in the previous poll.

Please follow Politics on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

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// oAnth

cf. with The Real News video - 2011-09-06
http://02mydafsoup-01.soup.io/post/157247657/Obama-Labor-Day-Speech-Praises-Union-Concessionsv
Reposted fromSigalonbandf Sigalonbandf
Play fullscreen
Obama Labor Day Speech Praises Union Concessions
Frank Hammer: Obama and UAW leadership restructured auto industry in a race to the bottom, not a stronger "middle class"3


July 07 2011

Into the wild and back again

The psychological wear and tear of office life leads many to fantasize about leaving it all behind. Ryo Chijiiwa knows this feeling well, but unlike most people he actually did something about it. In 2009, Chijiiwa quit his job at Google, packed up and moved off the grid.

In the following interview, Chijiiwa, who will speak in-depth about his experiences at OSCON, talks about how solitude and nature have shaped his perspective.


What possessed you to do an about-face from working for high-profile tech companies and ditch the grid?

RyoChijiiwa.jpgRyo Chijiiwa: Part of it was that I was simply burnt out. I had spent the better part of 10 years either studying computer science in college or working as a professional software engineer (or both), and I suddenly decided I wanted to experience life outside the cubicle. Living in the woods was a childhood dream of mine, and it seemed like a good time to realize that dream.

But, the other part was that I started to see some fundamental issues with the way the industry and our society are structured. At a personal level, I realized that striving for success and accomplishment didn't bring me any closer to happiness. And at a societal level, it occurred to me that a system predicated on infinite growth simply was not sustainable. So, I decided to step back, slow down, and rethink my life and my priorities.

Can you describe a typical day in the wilderness?

Ryo Chijiiwa: There's really no "typical" day in the wilderness. For a long time, there was actually a fair amount of work to do because I was trying to turn a patch of completely undeveloped land into something habitable. I built my cabin mostly on my own, and that alone took several months. The work that needs to happen also varies depending on the season. In the spring, I might be tending to the garden, or clearing brush to lower the risks of a forest fire. In the autumn, I might spend a lot of time gathering firewood. I also dedicate a fair chunk of time to cooking because food is important. There's also ample time for reading, writing, reflection and contemplation, too, which is one of the benefits of a slower lifestyle. Of course, if I can't find anything better to do, I can always step out of my cabin and go wander the woods.

Geek Lifestyle at OSCON 2011 — From fine-tuning your setup to taking the geek approach to growing your own food, we'll celebrate and explore hacker culture in all its richness in the Geek Lifestyle track at OSCON (July 25-29 in Portland, Ore.)

Save 20% on registration with the code OS11RAD


As far as communications go, I was completely cut off for a while. I had an iPhone, but AT&T had absolutely no coverage on my property, and I actually enjoyed being disconnected. There's a certain peace of mind you can get only by switching off completely. I eventually found out that Verizon had coverage, so I got a feature phone on a pre-paid plan for emergencies and for those few occasions when I needed access to the outside world.

After much deliberation, I got a MiFi earlier this year so I could go online, though I can't say getting "wired" was unequivocally better for my quality of life. With Internet access, I spend more time and electricity on my laptop, uselessly browsing the web when I could be doing something else. I think this is a common problem people have these days, but the shift that happened when I suddenly got Internet access really made it noticeable.

Electricity is another constraint. This past winter, when sunlight was scarce and my solar panels were covered in snow, I once had to tell my mom, who lives in Japan, that I couldn't Skype with her unless the sun shined. While the lack of power was something of an inconvenience, it was also reassuring to know that I could have power as long as the sun shines, which isn't something you can say when you're dependent on the grid and the power goes out.

What has solitude taught you?

Ryo Chijiiwa's Hut 1.0
Ryo Chijiiwa's Hut 1.0. He's currently working on Hut 2.1.
Ryo Chijiiwa: I've learned a ton. I've learned some carpentry and architecture from designing and building my own cabin. I've also learned a lot about off-grid electricity, about the importance of water, gardening, wildlife, and self-reliance, to name a few things. But the fact that I gained knowledge and skills is hardly surprising.

What I think made this experience uniquely valuable for me, though, is that I've learned so much about myself. In many ancient cultures, venturing out into the wilderness alone was a rite of passage, a necessary step toward adulthood. In our society, on the other hand, isolation is feared and even stigmatized. Yet, there's a lot about yourself that you can learn only through isolation and solitude. Sometimes, you can't hear yourself unless you put yourself in an environment where there's nobody else — no parents, no bosses, no peers. And knowing who I am, what my strengths and weaknesses are, and knowing what's really important to me is invaluable because the truly difficult decisions in life can only be solved if you know who you are.

Do you expect to bring that new knowledge back into the grid at some point?

Ryo Chijiiwa: Absolutely. I've been a fan of the open source model for a long time now, and I think a big part of it has to do with my desire to share and contribute things, whether it's code or knowledge. My entire journey, since the day I left Google, has been chronicled in my blog, Laptop and a Rifle, where I tried to make the whole experience pretty transparent. I'm also working on a book that's filled with practical knowledge, which will hopefully be published as an ebook sometime later this year.

What are the benefits of alternative lifestyles? What do they allow people to do?

Ryo Chijiiwa: Alternative lifestyles can have a number of advantages. The major one, I think, is that it helps us strike a better work-life balance. For example, I don't have to choose between working and living in a cabin in the woods because I can do both! One doesn't necessarily have to choose between working and traveling — you can do both! At the very least, there's so much more you can do when you're not spending 60 hours at the office.

I think there are some benefits to society at large, too. Living in a 120-square-foot cabin in the woods and living purely off of solar energy probably helped me reduce my carbon footprint. After the March 11 earthquake in Japan, I was able to jet off and volunteer in the tsunami disaster area for two months, which would have been difficult to pull off if I had been tethered to a job and a mortgage. Also, by sharing what I've learned, I'm hoping that that information will help others realize their own dreams, and live healthier, happier, and more sustainable lives.

Do you believe it's possible to find balance between always on and completely off?

Ryo Chijiiwa: It's very, very difficult. When I'm in my cabin, I've accomplished something of a middle ground, simply because I have a limited supply of electricity and my MiFi account has a 3GB per month data limit. The trend is clearly going in the other direction. Everything is going into the cloud, which means you'll need an "always on" connection to have access to not just your email and social life, but your photos, favorite TV shows and your music.

Living in the woods, and going from being completely disconnected to being mostly connected, made me realize how difficult it actually is to incorporate technologies into our lives in a healthy way. The pace of technological change is so blindingly fast that we're doing a poor job of adapting, not just at an individual level, but even as a society and as a species.

The environmental impact of technological changes that started two centuries ago only became apparent a few decades ago. It concerns me somewhat to think about how, two centuries from now, our descendants will look back on today's technologies and the impacts they have on people, societies and our environment. There will likely be unforeseen consequences, some of which may prove to be undesirable. Unfortunately, only time will tell.

This interview was edited and condensed.



Related:


May 09 2011

May 01 2011

David Harvey - Nice day for a revolution: Why May Day should be a date to stand up and change the system | World Politics, World - The Independent - 2011-04-29

[...]

While decolonisation throughout the rest of the world proceeded apace, the spread and, in some cases, imposition of economic development projects brought much of the globe into a tense relation with capitalist forms of development and underdevelopment (prompting a wave of revolutionary movements in the late 1960s into the 1970s, from Portugal to Mozambique). These movements were resolutely resisted, undermined and eventually rolled back through a combination of local elite power supported by US covert actions, coups and co-optations.

The crisis years of the 1970s forged another radical paradigm shift in economic thinking: neoliberalism came to town. There were frontal attacks on organised labour accompanied by a savage politics of wage repression. State involvement in the economy (particularly with respect to welfare provision and labour law) were radically rethought by Reagan and Thatcher. There were huge concessions to big capital and the result was that the rich got vastly richer and the poor relatively poorer. But, interestingly, aggregate growth rates remained low even as the consolidation of plutocratic power proceeded apace.

An entirely different world then emerged, totally hostile to organised labour and resting more and more on precarious, temporary and dis- organised labour spread-eagled across the earth. The proletariat became increasingly feminine.

The crisis of 2007-9 sparked a brief global attempt to stabilise the world's financial system using Keynesian tools. But after that the world split into two camps: one, based in North America and Europe, sees the crisis as an opportunity to complete the end-game of a vicious neoliberal project of class domination: the other cultivates Keynesian nostalgia, as if the postwar growth history of the United States can be repeated in China and in other emerging markets.

The Chinese, blessed with huge foreign exchange reserves, launched a vast stimulus programme building infrastructures, whole new cities and productive capacities to absorb labour and compensate for the crash of export markets. The state-controlled banks lent furiously to innumerable local projects. The growth rate surged to above 10 per cent and millions were put back to work. This was followed by a tepid attempt to put in motion the other pinion of a Keynesian programme: raising wages and social expenditures to bolster the internal market.

China's growth has had spillover effects. Raw material suppliers, such as Australia and Chile and much of the rest of Latin America have resumed strong growth.

The problems that attach to such a Keynesian programme are well-known. Asset bubbles, particularly in the "hot" property market in China, are forming all over the place and inflation is accelerating in classic fashion to suggest a different kind of crisis may be imminent. But also the environmental consequences are generally acknowledged, even by the Chinese government, to be disastrous, while labour and social unrest is escalating.

China contrasts markedly with the politics of austerity being visited upon the populations of North America and Europe. The neoliberal formula established in the Mexican debt crisis of 1982, is here being repeated. When the US Treasury and the IMF ...

[...]

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April 19 2011

02mydafsoup-01

April 15 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Economic Democracy: An Idea Whose Time Has Come, Again? | Social Europe 2011-04-14

[...]

Two familiar and intersecting contradictions of union action were evident across Europe. One was the dilemma of short-term imperatives versus long-term objectives. Was the aim to negotiate with those wielding political and economic power for damage limitation, and perhaps a tighter regulatory architecture for financialised capitalism; or to lead an oppositional movement for an alternative socio-economic order?

According to one Belgian socialist union leader, “The situation really is not simple for trade union organisations. The analysis of the crisis is not complicated: neoliberalism cannot deliver. The difficulty is that today, discourse is not enough. It is easy to say: we need to change the balance of forces. But that does not tell us how to proceed…. Our members expect us to look after their immediate interests.”

The second contradiction was between a global economic crisis and trade union action which is essentially national or indeed sub-national in character. The international trade union organisations produced powerful analyses and progressive demands, but their impact on day-to-day trade union practice on the ground was non-existent. Indeed the dominant response has been to defend and enhance competitiveness, meaning a struggle of country against country, workplace against workplace, intensifying the downwards pressure on wages and conditions.

To these two contradictions must be added the loss of a vision of an alternative socio-economic order. Actually, ‘existing socialism’ had discredited the idea of communism long before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Social democracy likewise abandoned the struggle for a new social order in the face of economic adversity, engaging in concession bargaining with multinational capital and the international financial institutions. Centre-left trade unionists came to object to the ‘new, overmighty capitalism’ of hedge funds, asset-stripping, financial speculation and astronomical bonuses. The solution, it appeared, was to seek to restore the old capitalism: the trade union movement should ‘become a champion of good business practices, of decent relations with decent employers while ruthlessly fighting the speculators’.[2]

So has the crisis indeed been wasted? Perhaps one means of connecting short-term (and probably ineffectual) defence to a struggle for another world of work could be renewed attention to the idea of economic democracy. In the past two years, there has been much discussion of the deficiencies in existing systems of corporate governance, particularly as the liberalisation of global financial transactions has made ‘shareholder value’ the overriding corporate goal even in ‘coordinated’ market economies.[3] The solution, however, cannot simply be a technocratic regulatory fix; what is required is democratic control of capital. With the shock of crisis, some union policymakers have come to recognise that the overriding challenge is to build a movement for greater democratisation of the economy and to create new links between different levels of regulation and different issues on the regulatory agenda.

[...]

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"Economic Democracy: An Idea Whose Time Has Come, Again?" by Richard Hyman

‘There can be no return to business as usual’: this was the unanimous trade union response to the global crisis. For a time in early 2009, the legitimacy of capitalism was itself questioned in...
Reposted from02myEcon-01 02myEcon-01

April 03 2011

March 31 2011

March 23 2011

The Republican's Big Lies About Jobs (And Why Obama Must Repudiate Them) | Robert Reich - blog - 2011-03-22

And if all others accepted the lie which the party imposed – if all records told the same tale – then the lie passed into history and became the truth.

– George Orwell, 1984 (published in 1949)

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor was in town yesterday (specifically, at Stanford’s Hoover Institute where he could surround himself with sympathetic Republicans) to tell this whopper: “Cutting the federal deficit will create jobs.”

It’s not true. Cutting the deficit will creates fewer jobs. Less government spending reduces overall demand. This is particularly worrisome when, as now, consumers and businesses are still holding back. Fewer government workers have paychecks to buy stuff from other Americans, some of whom in turn will lose their jobs without enough customers.

But truth doesn’t seem to matter. Republicans figure if their big lies are repeated often enough, people will start to believe them.

Unless, that is, those big lies are repudiated – and big truths are told in their place.

What worries me almost as much as the Republican’s repeated big lies about jobs is the silence of President Obama and Democratic leaders in the face of them. Obama has the bully pulpit. Republicans don’t. But if he doesn’t use it the Republican’s big lies gain credibility.

Here are some other whoppers being repeated daily:

Cutting taxes on the rich creates jobs.” Nope. Trickle-down economics has been tried for thirty years and hasn’t worked. After George W. Bush cut taxes on the rich, far fewer jobs were created than after Bill Clinton raised them in the 1990s.

To his credit, President Obama argued against Republican demands for extending the Bush tax cut for those making more than a quarter million. But as soon as Republicans pushed back he caved. And the President hasn’t even mentioned that the $61 billion Republicans are demanding in budget cuts this fiscal year is what richer Americans would have paid in taxes had he not caved.

Cutting corporate income taxes creates jobs.” Baloney. American corporations don’t need tax cuts. They’re sitting on over $1.5 trillion of cash right now. They won’t invest it in additional capacity or jobs because they don’t see enough customers out there with enough money in their pockets to buy what the additional capacity would produce.

The President needs to point this out – not just in Washington but across the nation where Republican governors are slashing corporate taxes and simultaneously cutting school budgets. President Obama says he wants to invest in American skills, but many states are doing the opposite. Florida Governor Rick Scott, for example, says his proposed corporate tax cuts “will give Florida a competitive edge in attracting jobs.” They’ll also require education spending be reduced by $3 billion. Florida already ranks near the bottom in per-pupil spending and has one of nation’s lowest graduation rates. If Scott’s tax cuts create jobs, most will pay peanuts.

Cuts in wages and benefits create jobs.” Congressional Republicans and their state counterparts repeat this lie incessantly. It also lies behind corporate America’s incessant demand for wage and benefit concessions – and corporate and state battles against unions. But it’s dead wrong. Meager wages and benefits are reducing the spending power of tens of millions of American workers, which is prolonging the jobs recession.

President Obama and Democratic leaders should be standing up for the wages and benefits of ordinary Americans, standing up for unions, and decrying the lie that wage and benefit concessions are necessary to create jobs. The President should be traveling to the Midwest – taking aim at Republican governors in the heartland who are hell bent on destroying the purchasing power of American workers. But he’s doing nothing of the sort.

Regulations kill jobs.” Congressional Republicans are using this whopper to justify their attempts to defund regulatory agencies. Regulations whose costs to business exceed their benefits to the public are unwarranted, of course, but reasonable regulation is necessary to avoid everything from nuclear meltdowns to oil spills to mine disasters to food contamination – all of which we’ve sadly witnessed. Here again, we’re hearing little from the President or Democratic leaders.

Look, the President can’t be everywhere, doing everything. There’s tumult in the Middle East, we’re suddenly at war in Libya, Japan is struggling with the aftermath of disaster, and surely Latin America is an important trading partner.

But nothing is more central to average Americans than jobs and wages. Unless the President forcefully rebuts Republican’s big lies, they’ll soon become conventional wisdom.

Reposted from02myEcon-01 02myEcon-01

March 08 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Freelancers United

A member of the collective is a person accepted by the other members, who helps the collective to achieve its goals. So it can be anybody.

What is a collective of freelancers?

It is just a collective, but the members are freelancers and the goals are economically driven, because the freelancers are nomads in the world called economy and they are passing through the deserts, the rich jungles,forests and fields or the cold plains of the economy searching for food haha.

Reposted fromhannes hannes

November 16 2010

02mydafsoup-01
Play fullscreen
YouTube - Lewis Hine | A documentary for National History Day about the photojournalist Lewis Hine

March 24 2009

It's Always Ada Lovelace Day at O'Reilly

I had a hard time choosing just one of the many marvelous women in tech that I might write about for Ada Lovelace Day, because, frankly, I'm surrounded by those women! Where so many think of the tech world as male-dominated, women have always played a major role at O'Reilly. A large part of our management team has always consisted of women, and women are the creators of some of our best known products and brands. I want to acknowledge their contributions, highlighting the fact that they have been so central to the success of my company. I also want to emphasize that there are many ways to contribute to a tech community, and that being a coder is not the only way to have an impact on the world of computing.


Christina o'reillyMy first hat tip has to go to my wife, Christina O'Reilly. She's a playwright and choreographer, not a techie. But if you've been influenced by me, you've also been influenced by her. The company, its values, and much of its unusual nature have been profoundly shaped by our relationship. (You can see her influence in some of the early company documents you'll find here,.) In more ways than I can count, I've built the company to be one that she would be proud of. We met when I was nineteen, and she's been part of everything I've ever done, in the same way that Elizabeth Barrett Browning said of her husband, Robert Browning:


What I do and what I dream include thee,


As the wine must taste of its own grapes


From the earliest years of the company, most of my key managers have been women. From 1985 till about 2000, there was a troika--Linda Walsh, Linda Lamb, and Cathy Brennan--who helped me shape the corporate culture, and for many years were touchstones for the values I still espouse.


Linda Walsh was my first employee. She helped me build my original documentation consulting business, and helped me come into my own as a leader when I broke up with my original business partner. She was also the key business leader for our digital books initiative in the late 1990s and one of the founders of Safari Books Online.


Linda Lamb was a key member of the team (along with me and Dale Dougherty) that developed our original publishing program back in 1985. Linda also served as our director of marketing for many years, with a delicious, quirky sense of humor. (I still remember one of her earliest trade show pieces, a wonderful riff on the National Enquirer, in which she reported on abductions by strange aliens with big eyes, programmers forced to participate in camel races, and exorcisms performed after errors in programming with curses.) She was also the original author of one of our first books, Learning the Vi Editor, and later creator (with Nancy Keene) of our series of Patient-Centered Guides.


I hired Cathy Brennan (now Strider) as a receptionist in 1985 or 1986, but her common sense soon made her one of my most trusted advisers and her ability to get things done made her one of my senior executives. When I decided to move to California from Boston in 1987, Cathy was the one who persuaded me to move our then-fledgling publishing business along with me, and agreed to move out herself to set up customer service and operations for this new line of business. She built and ran our operations as we grew from a tiny startup to a publishing powerhouse. She also managed the design and construction of our office complex in Sebastopol.


Laura baldwinLaura Baldwin joined the company as CFO in 2001, just as we were crashing into the wall of the dot com bust. I can with confidence say that we wouldn't have survived without her. I had always held up Harold, the last of the Saxon kings of England, as one of my management heroes. He went down to defeat by William the Conqueror rather than abandon his people to fight another day. Laura convinced me that I needed to do layoffs--and when I did, I found that the people we laid off moved on to what were often better jobs for them, and the company itself became leaner, more creative, and more effective. Laura brought financial discipline to the company. She helped bring us back from the brink, and built a bigger, more profitable, and more successful company. Living to fight another day helped us to birth the Web 2.0 movement, Foo Camp, Make: magazine, the Missing Manuals, and many of the other post-2001 products we are known for today.


Laura is now our COO as well as CFO, and is the day-to-day manager of the business. Those of you who wonder how I find so much


I have learned more about the nuts and bolts of business from Laura than from any other person. Harold Geneen once said "The skill of management is to achieve your objectives through the efforts of others." Laura knows how to do that in spades - she's a great manager. But she's also the most amazingly productive person I've ever met. Usually, you have to choose between an effective manager and an effective individual contributor. Laura somehow manages to be both.


CJ rayhillThe list goes on.
CJ Rayhill was our CIO for seven years, working with Laura to build the information systems that turned O'Reilly into a "real company." (She was also one of the first women to graduate from the Naval Academy - here's an interview about her history in the tech industry.) She's now the COO for Safari Books Online, where she's managing the extremely cool features that will be appearing in Safari 6.0 later this year.


Gina blaberGina Blaber was the original managing editor for GNN, the world's first commercial website. She then ran our software group (remember Website Pro, the first PC-based web server?) and now runs the O'Reilly Conferences group. If you've ever been to an O'Reilly event, it's easy to think that the speakers and program chairs do all the work, forgetting that it's Gina and her team (mostly women) who make it all look so easy.


Laurie petryckiLaurie Petrycki ran several of our publishing divisions (notably Head First and Missing Manuals) before taking on the challenge last year of launching our new education division.


And that's leaving out the many women who've worked as editors, copyeditors, designers, and production staff at O'Reilly over the years. If you've ever read and enjoyed an O'Reilly book, take a moment to appreciate how many hands, how many eyes, read it before you did, to shape it into its final form.


Sara wingeSara Winge is the creator of Foo Camp, one of O'Reilly's quirkiest and most influential initiatives. While Wikipedia claims me as a co-creator of the event, I have to say that it has always really been Sara's brainchild. I had wanted to do some kind of events at O'Reilly after the dot com bust left us with a lot of unused space, and I might have even proposed residential events, but Sara is the one who picked up this idea from the heap where we tend to leave good ideas that don't have anyone to make them real.


Sara conceived and developed the format (inspired in part by Open Space, she says, but to my mind, all the best parts were original.) I've just been the front-man and impresario. So if you've been to Foo Camp, or to Bar Camp, or any of the many other "Camp" spinoffs, you owe a big round of thanks to Sara. Foo Camp also demonstrates a uniquely feminine sensibility. Sara didn't charge to the front; she created a context where other people can shine, quietly facilitating. As Lao Tzu said, "When the best leader leads, the people say, 'We did it ourselves.'"


Edie freedmanEdie Freedman is the creator of the distinctive O'Reilly animal brand. Many people know a bit about the story of how strange animals came to be the symbols of so many technologies, but what they probably don't know that behind this brand, so central to the company's heritage, was an act of generosity by a complete stranger.


Our first books, published late in 1985, all had the same simple cover, featuring the image of a nutshell. The idea was that these small books had everything you needed, in a nutshell. In 1987, with seven books in print, we realized that people at trade shows weren't recognizing that we had more than one book, so we hired a designer to produce some new covers. She developed a treatment that was colorful, geometric and high-tech. We had an all-hands meeting on a Friday afternoon to review the new cover treatment. I just couldn't go for it. It was too expected. I said we'd have to try again.


original cover reading & writing termcap entriesLinda Lamb shared our plight with her housemate, Edie, who at the time was a designer at Digital Equipment Corporation. Edie thought that Unix program names sounded like weird animals. She also realized that 19th century woodcuts provided a unique, low-cost design option. Fair enough. But she went further than that. She produced and laid out seven mechanicals of possible covers over the weekend. Linda brought them in on Monday, free of charge. Here's one of the original designs, for original cover design, sed & awkSed & Awk, a book that didn't even exist yet.)


How cool is that? One of the great brands in tech was a gift from a stranger! (Edie did later come to work for us, and served as our Creative Director for many years. She is still with the company.) That is one of the many experiences that made me receptive to the idea of open source as a gift culture when Eric Raymond wrote about that in 1997.


(While I'm on the subject of the kindness of strangers, I have to call out the contributions of Danese Cooper and Linda Stone, two people who've never worked for O'Reilly but who might as well have done, for all the tireless work they do on our behalf. I met Danese through our mutual work on open source when she was the "open source diva" at Sun, and later at Intel. She's the person I always call when anyone asks me for advice on open source licensing, community, or corporate adoption. Linda Stone, former maven at Apple and Microsoft, is a mentor and inspiration on the value of making connections between people who ought to know each other. Linda is also the one who had the brilliant idea of Science Foo Camp when Timo Hannay of the Nature Publishing Group and I were scratching our heads trying to find a project to do together. She's also the one who suggested we ask Google to host the party. Never mind random acts of kindness; there's real power in random acts of connection. When I said a few years back that our purpose at Foo Camp is to create new synapses in the global brain, I was channeling what I learned from Linda.)


I could go on and on. There's Allison Randal, who Nat Torkington already wrote about in his own Ada Lovelace Day post earlier today. There's Kathy Sierra, the creator of the amazing Head First series of books, and also the subject of many another Ada Lovelace Day post. There's Carla Bayha, who for many years was the computer book buyer at Borders, and whose penetrating judgment helped books on many an obscure topic find space on shelves across America. Carla is truly an unsung hero of the industry.


And of course, I celebrate the many other women authors, conference speakers, and coders who've been a part of O'Reilly's story over the years. Truly, we could never have done it without you. As far as I'm concerned, it's always Ada Lovelace Day at O'Reilly.

March 05 2009

Sündenböcke gesucht - Telepolis - 2009-03-05

Die immer weiter an Dynamik gewinnende Krise beeinflusst bereits jetzt die europäischen Migrationsströme nachhaltig. Mit Großbritannien, Irland und Spanien befinden sich gerade die Staaten im Epizentrum dieses Weltmarktbebens, die zu den bevorzugten Zielländern der osteuropäischen Wanderarbeiter gehörten. Millionen Menschen aus den - im Zuge der Systemtransformation nach 1989 nahezu deindustrialisierten - Ländern Mittelosteuropas machten sich auf der Suche nach Lohn und Brot gen Westen auf, nachdem ihre Staaten 2004 und 2007 der Europäischen Union beitraten. Die wichtigsten Ursprungsregionen dieser Auswanderungswelle bilden im Norden Polen und das Baltikum, im Süden Rumänien und Bulgarien. Dabei etablierten sich zwei von Ost nach West verlaufende Migrationsströme: den nördlichen bildeten die polnischen Arbeitsmigranten, die meist nach England und Irland auswanderten; den südlichen die Bulgaren und Rumänen, deren Zielländer hauptsächlich Spanien und Italien waren. 
Reposted byfilme filme
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