Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

May 24 2012

Jon Loeliger offers some practices to use with Git

After finishing the second edition of "Version Control with Git," author Jon Loeliger talked to me about some of the advice he offers and how to use Git effectively as changes to code pile up.

Highlights from the full video interview include:

  • What's new in Git since the first edition of the book? [Discussed at the 0:38 mark]
  • Importance of understanding concepts behind Git [Discussed at the 2:40 mark]
  • How to manage complicated branching [Discussed at the 3:33 mark]
  • Aspects of Github beyond storage [Discussed at the 6:22 mark]

You can view the entire conversation in the following video:

OSCON 2012 — Join the world's open source pioneers, builders, and innovators July 16-20 in Portland, Oregon. Learn about open development, challenge your assumptions, and fire up your brain.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR

Related:

May 09 2012

Four short links: 9 May 2012

  1. We Need Version Control for Real Stuff (Chris Anderson) -- This is pointing us toward the next step, a GitHub for stuff. If open source hardware is going to take off like open source software, we need this. (via Evil Mad Scientist)
  2. Graduates and Post-Graduates on Food Stamps (Chronicle of Higher Education) -- two points for me here: the inherent evil of not paying a living wage; and the pain of market signals that particular occupations and specialisations are not as useful as once they were. I imagine it's hard to repurpose the specific knowledge in a Masters of Medieval History to some other field, though hopefully the skills of diligent hard work, rapid acquisition of knowledge, and critical thought will apply to new jobs. Expect more of this as we replace human labour with automation. I look forward to the software startup which creates work for people outside the organisation; the ultimate "create more value than you capture".
  3. Explore Exoplanets with Gestural Interfaces -- uses John Underkoffler's Oblong gestural interface. Underkoffler came up with the Minority Report interface which has fed the dreams of designers for years.
  4. Book Marketing Lessons Learned (Sarah Milstein) -- I really liked this honest appraisal of how Baratunde Thurston marketed his "How to be Black" book, and am doubly chuffed that it appeared on the O'Reilly Radar blog. I was fascinated by his Street Team, but knew I wanted to bring it to your attention when I read this. Start with your inner circle. I had an epiphany with Gary Vaynerchuk. I asked: "Did I ever ask you to buy my book?" He said, "Yeah, I bought it yesterday." I talked about his book, but cash on the table — it didn't happen. He wished he had identified everyone he knows, sending a personal note explaining: "A) buy the book; B) this means a lot to me. You owe me or I will owe you. Here's some things you can do to help: If you have speaking opportunities, let me know. For instance, I would love to speak at schools." Make it easy for people who want to help you. Everything else is bonus. If you haven't already converted the inner circle, you've skipped a critical step. "Let the people who already love you show it" is the skill I feel like I've spent years working on, and still have years to go.

February 07 2012

Four short links: 7 February 2012

  1. Integrated Content Editor (GitHub) -- a track changes implementation, built in javascript, for anything that is contenteditable on the web, written by the NY Times team and open sourced.
  2. Data Tables -- featureful jQuery plugin for tables of data. (via Javascript Weekly)
  3. Creating a Developer Community (Slideshare) -- treat the problem like a channel conversion funnel: turn visitors into downloaders, downloaders into users, users into contributors. His screenshots of shitty conversions are great! (via Kohsuke Kawaguchi)
  4. Sex Differences in Intimate Relationships (PDF) -- Albert-Laszlo Barabasi and others use social graph analysis to analyze communications patterns in relationships. Notice that not only does the preference for an opposite-sex “best friend” kick in significantly earlier for females than for males (~18 years vs mid-20s, respectively), but females maintain a higher plateau value for much longer. More reality mining to understand ourselves. (via Sean Gourley)

December 19 2011

Four short links: 19 December 2011

  1. The History of Version Control (Francis Irving) -- concise history of the key advances in managing source code versions. Worth it just for the delicious apposition of "history" and "version control".
  2. BrowserID -- Mozilla's authentication solution. BrowserID aims to provide a secure way of proving your identity to servers across the Internet, without having to create separate usernames and passwords each time. Instead of a new username, it uses your email address as your identity which allows it to be decentralized since anyone can send you an email verification message. It's currently implemented via JavaScript but hopefully it will be built into the browser in the future. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. A Look Inside Mobile Design Patterns -- Sample chapter on how different apps handle invitations, from a new [O'Reilly-published, huzzah!] book on mobile design patterns. (via David Kaneda)
  4. Node Toolbox -- concise compendium of resources for node.js development.

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl