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Karl Marx Allee

Where there had been ruins of a an area of densely populated, working class housing, the East Germans build what they styled "The first socialist street". It replaced the "Große Frankfurter Straße" and from 1949 to 1961 was known as "Stalin Allee".

Designed in the so-called wedding-cake style, the socialist classicism of the Soviet Union, the avenue, which is 292 feet wide and nearly 1¼ miles long, is lined with monumental eight-storey buildings containing spacious and luxurious apartments for workers, as well as shops, restaurants, cafés, a tourist hotel and an enormous cinema (the International), At each end are dual towers at Frankfurter Tor (in the middle distance) and Strausberger Platz.

Reposted fromvintagephotography vintagephotography
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April 18 2012

March 18 2012

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December 30 2011

Paying for Parking | marginalrevolution.com 2011-12-29

Parking is too cheap and the price is too sticky. As Tyler wrote in his NYT column:

If developers were allowed to face directly the high land costs of providing so much parking, the number of spaces would be a result of a careful economic calculation rather than a matter of satisfying a legal requirement. Parking would be scarcer, and more likely to have a price – or a higher one than it does now – and people would be more careful about when and where they drove.

The subsidies are largely invisible to drivers who park their cars – and thus free or cheap parking spaces feel like natural outcomes of the market, or perhaps even an entitlement. Yet the law is allocating this land rather than letting market prices adjudicate whether we need more parking, and whether that parking should be free. We end up overusing land for cars – and overusing cars too. You don’t have to hate sprawl,

Slowly things are beginning to change, however, as this excellent piece on parking in LA and parking scholar Donald Shoup describes:

Shoup is not opposed to all parking lots; he’s against cities requiring parking lots. “Would you require every home to come with a pool or every office to include a dining room because someone might want it?” asks Shoup. “Why not let developers build parking where the market demands it and charge its true value?”

…This spring the DOT plans to introduce an $18.5 million smart wireless meter system based on Shoup’s theories. Called ExpressPark, the 6,000-meter array will be installed on downtown streets and lots, along with sensors buried in the pavement of every parking spot to detect the presence of cars and price accordingly, from as little as 50 cents an hour to $6. Street parking, like pork bellies, will be open to market forces. As blocks fill, prices will rise; when occupancy drops, so will rates. In an area like downtown, ideal for Shoup’s progressive pricing, people will park based on how much they’re willing to pay versus how far they are willing to walk to a destination. In a trendy area like Melrose Avenue’s shopping district, where parking on side streets is forbidden to visitors, Shoup would open those residential blocks to market-priced meters, wooing home owners by guaranteeing that meter profits would be turned over to them in the form of property tax deductions. (That benefit could add up to thousands of dollars a year per household.)

Brooklyn’s Park Slope neighborhood is already experimenting with a version of the system, and so are San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C.

In D.C. you can now pay many parking meters via cell-phone. I’ve used the system and it works well.

Here are previous MR posts on parking.

Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

October 27 2011

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#economics #politics #anarchism

  • Global Resilience Requires Novelty – A Speech by Buzz Holling link
  • Deric Shannon: What Do We Mean By “Works”? Anarchist Economics and the Occupy X Movement link

#agriculture #food #urbanfarming

  • Worst Food Additive Ever? It's in Half of All Foods We Eat and Its Production Destroys Rainforests and Enslaves Children link
  • Marc Alt on Hacking the Food System: Urban Rural Global Local link

#arduino #diy #openhardware

  • The Making of Arduino link
  • Open-source hardware… coming from Facebook? link

#floss #gimp

  • Subtle patterns available for GIMP link
— links by Julien Guigner via oAnth at Diaspora* | 2011-10-27

October 02 2011

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Shopping centres die in stages: like retail lepers, they lose limbs. Anchors are what keep them alive. They are the heart – a popular franchise, supermarket or department store that directs traffic past the smaller stores. Anchors such as food halls and cinema complexes are placed at the end of long stretches of glazed windows. The industry standard states that the maximum distance shoppers are prepared to walk between anchors is three hundred metres. This is called anchor drag.

Competing centres will often anchor-steal in an attempt to attract tenants and shoppers alike. When an anchor leaves, dead zones appear. Pedestrian traffic diverts like a dammed river. Blank corridors. Roller-doors. To survive, the weak gather around the strong.

Greyfields | Reportage | Edition 25: After the Crisis | all-pages | Griffith REVIEW
Reposted fromhenteaser henteaser viabrightbyte brightbyte

October 01 2011

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September 29 2011

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Lost View

In a view that is unlikely to ever be replicated, Mies van der Rohe's iconic IBM Building rises above the Chicago River at dusk. It was his last American building and he died in 1969 before its completion.

This view was only available for a few short months in 2005 after the old Sun-Times building was razed to make room for the new Trump Tower. I have serious regrets that I didn't spend more time shooting the exposed IBM that summer. Now the Trump Tower dominates this scene and obscures the simpler beauty of van der Rohe's work.

Reposted bypaszczaczek paszczaczek

July 18 2011

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Crack The Surface - Episode 1 - The first in a series of short documentaries focusing on the culture of Urban Exploring. In this episode we follow those who risk it all to access and infiltrate closed and forgotten spaces.

----------------------------------------------
// oAnth

see other episodes via http://www.silentuk.com/
Reposted fromdelix delix
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