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March 14 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Berlin Rally #FREEBRADLEYMANNING 15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor #freebrad #wikileaks | Freiheit für Bradley Manning





GUILTY OF TELLING THE TRUTH. FREE BRADLEY MANNING!


Schuldig die Wahrheit ans Licht gebracht zu haben.



15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor, Pariser Platz Rückseite der Amerikanischen Botschaft. Rally for Bradley Manning in Berlin.





Reposted bywikileakslydschi

March 02 2012

Play fullscreen
Senate bill aims to prevent indefinite detention of US citizens

FSRN: Senate responds to controversial National Defense Authorization Act which President Obama signed into law late last year

Time: 05:32 More in News & Politics
Reposted bycheg00 cheg00

February 28 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Suing the United States Government to stop the implementation of the NDAA



Stop the NDAA!

Support Chris Hedges, Noam Chomsky, Daniel Ellsberg, and Birgitta Jonsdottir in suing the United States Government to stop the implementation of the NDAA - It's set to take effect on March 1, 2012 and we want to sign up as many grassroots supporters as possible before then.

February 05 2012

Bradley Manning Nobel Peace Prize Nomination 2012

laugardagur, febrúar 04, 2012

February 1st  2012 the entire parliamentary group of The Movement of the Icelandic Parliament nominated Private Bradley Manning for the Nobel Peace Prize. Following is the reasoning we sent to the committee explaining why we felt compelled to nominate Private Bradley Manning for this important recognition of an individual effort to have an impact for peace in our world. Our letter to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee: We have the great honor of nominating Private First Class Bradley Manning for the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize. Manning is a soldier in the United States army who stands accused of releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. The leaked documents pointed to a long history of corruption, war crimes, and imperialism by the United States government in international dealings. These revelations have fueled democratic uprising around the world, including a democratic revolution in Tunisia. [...]

via  Evernote
Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

February 01 2012

02mydafsoup-01

January 17 2012

Chris Hedges Sues Obama Admin Over Indefinite Detention of US Citizens Approved in NDAA

www.democracynow.org - Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges has filed suit against President Obama and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta to challenge the legality of the National Defense Authorization Act, which includes controversial provisions authorizing the military to jail anyone it considers a terrorism suspect anywhere in the world, without charge or trial. Sections of the bill are written so broadly that critics say they could encompass journalists who report on terror-related issues, such as Hedges, for supporting enemy forces. "It is clearly unconstitutional," Hedges says of the bill. "It is a huge and egregious assault against our democracy. It overturns over 200 years of law, which has kept the military out of domestic policing." We speak with Hedges, now a senior fellow at the Nation Institute, and former New York Times foreign correspondent who was part of a team of reporters that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper's coverage of global terrorism. We are also joined by Hedges' attorney Carl Mayer, who filed the litigation on his behalf in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York. Towatch the complete daily, independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, and for additional coverage of the NDAA and civil liberties issues, visit the Democracy Now! news archives at www.democracynow.org FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: www.facebook.com Twitter: @democracynow Subscribe on YouTube: www.youtube <b>...</b>
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Time: 12:11 More in News & Politics
Reposted fromVideosDemocracy VideosDemocracy

January 09 2012

7 Hebdo | L’éliminateur - Le Républicain Lorrain

Le film de Rithy Panh Duch, le maître des forges de l’enfer est diffusé demain sur France 3 avant sa sortie en salles le 18 janvier.

 

-------------------------------------

 // quotation by oAnth

 [...]

 Pourquoi et comment, un paisible enseignant en mathématiques s’est progressivement transformé en un rouage parfaitement huilé de l’une des plus monstrueuses machines de mort du XX e siècle ? Face à la caméra, c’est un homme-tronc, assis derrière une modeste table de travail, qui s’explique pendant plus d’une heure et quarante minutes. Relativement impassible, Duch raconte comment il fut l’artisan méticuleux de l’élimination physique des ennemis de l’Angkar, littéralement « l’organisation », qui était alors à la tête de son pays. Parce qu’il croyait à ce Kampuchéa démocratique né sur les cendres du royaume de Sihanouk. Parce que c’était « l’intérêt du parti » et parce que c’était « son propre intérêt : afin de rester vivant ». Pour toutes ces raisons, explique-t-il, « ce travail, je devais le faire ». Et parce qu’il n’était pas homme à négliger sa tâche, il s’en est remarquablement acquitté.

 Un raisonnement parfaitement glacial servi par des exécutants pour qui les prisonniers étaient si certainement voués au trépas qu’ils finissaient par les considérer « comme de simples bûches ». C’est-à-dire des objets, des non-sujets. Rien de plus. Duch s’étonne d’ailleurs : « Méchant ? Cruel ? Je ne sais pas quel sens donner à ces mots ».

 [...]

 Original URL -- http://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/actualite/2012/01/08/l-eliminateur

 

See it on Scoop.it, via manually by oAnth - from my scoop.it contacts

January 01 2012

3793 7413

thedailywhat:

This Is Important, You Should Know About It of the Day: President Obama today quietly signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, which contains controversial provisions requiring military custody for any non-citizen suspected of terrorism and affirming the president’s authority to indefinitely detain any supporter of al-Qaeda “or associated forces, irrespective of citizenship.

In a signing statement, the President said he had “serious reservations” about the bill, and criticised lawmakers for interfering with the work of counterterrorism professionals.

“Moving forward, my administration will interpret and implement the provisions described below in a manner that best preserves the flexibility on which our safety depends and upholds the values on which this country was founded,” the statement said.

The Obama administration was successful in striking down a provision that would have removed the ability of the executive branch to override the military custody requirement. Additionally, US citizens and legal immigrants may not be subjected to military custody under the revised bill.

However, an amendment to explicitly exclude American citizens and lawful residents from indefinite detention was rejected by Congress.

“My administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens,” Obama said. “Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a nation.”

The President’s personal stance aside, in addition to creating myriad difficulties for counterterrorism agents working with suspected terrorists to gain information, the NDAA provisions leave the door wide open for future presidents to indefinitely detain American citizens without trial.

[ap / think / aclu.]

Reposted fromLuckyLobos LuckyLobos viasofias sofias

December 22 2011

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New Military Detention Powers Threaten Basic Rights

David Swanson: President Obama in full support of provisions that target US citizens and others with extraordinary powers of detention without trial

Time: 11:06 More in News & Politics
Reposted bysofiasn0gbrightbytemondkroeteozelbotkrekk

December 19 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Play fullscreen
Glenn Greenwald Reports on Bradley Manning's Military Pre-Trial Hearing
Uploaded by democracynow on Dec 19, 2011
DemocracyNow.org - Democracy Now! interviews constitutional lawyer and Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald about the military pre-trial hearing now underway for alleged U.S. Army whistleblower Bradley Manning, who has been accused for releasing classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks. Greenwald comments on the possible strategy being put forth by Manning's defense. "All the Manning [tribunal] hearings have been shrouded in secrecy," Greenwald says, noting there may be more transparency in Guantánamo detainee hearings than there has been for the Manning tribunal. "Presumably, his lawyer believes that one of the best ways they have to keep him out of prison for the next six decades is to argue that he had diminished capacity by virtue of emotional distress over the gender struggles that he had, over his sexual orientation being in a military that had a policy of banning those who were openly gay, and so part of this emotional distress that they're raising is designed to say that he should be excused of his actions because they were not the byproduct of full choice," says Greenwald, who is openly gay, and has been writing extensively about this aspect of Manning's case. "He is, and I don't blame him at all, trying to do whatever he can to avoid having his life destroyed: Either being killed by the state or locked up in a cage for the rest of his life."

To watch the complete daily, independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, and for more information about Bradley Manning and WikiLeaks, visit http://www.democracynow.org/tags/wikileaks
Reposted bywikileakssofiasbrightbyteignominy

December 17 2011

02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01

December 16 2011

Obama and the final destruction of the constitution

The 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, if signed into law, will signal the death knell of our constitutional republic and the formal inception of a legalized police state in the United States. Passed by the House on May 26, 2011 (HR 1540), the Senate version (S. 1867) was passed on Dec. 1, 2011. Now only one man — Barack Obama, a scholar of constitutional law — will make the decision as to whether the Bill of Rights he went to Harvard to study will be superceded by a law that abrogates it.
First, let’s be clear what is at stake. Most critical are Sections 1031 and 1032 of the Act, which authorize detaining U.S. citizens indefinitely without charge or trial if deemed necessary by the president. The bill would allow federal officials to take these steps based on suspicions only, without having to demonstrate to any judicial official that there is solid evidence to justify their actions. No reasonable proof will any longer be required for the government to suspend an American citizen’s constitutional rights. Detentions can follow mere membership, past or present, in “suspect organizations.” Government agents would have unchecked authority to arrest, interrogate, and indefinitely detain law-abiding citizens if accused of potentially posing a threat to “national security.” Further, military personnel anywhere in the world would be authorized to seize U.S. citizens without due process. As Senator Lindsay Graham put it, under this Act the U.S. homeland is considered a “battlefield.”
What is at stake is more than the Constitution itself, as central as that document has been to the American experiment in democracy. What is a stake is nothing short of the basic fundamentals of western jurisprudence. Central to civilized law is the notion that a person cannot be held without a charge and cannot be detained indefinitely without a trial. These principles date back to Greco-Roman times, were developed by English common law beginning in 1215 with the Magna Carta, and were universalized by the Enlightenment in the century before the American Constitution and Bill of Rights were fought for and adopted as the supreme law of the land.
For more than two centuries of constitutional development since then, the United States has been heralded as the light to the world precisely because of the liberties it enshrined in its Declaration of Independence and Constitution as inalienable. It now seems as if the events of 9/11 have been determined to be of such a threatening magnitude that our national leaders feel justified to abrogate in their entirety the very inalienable principles upon which our Republic was founded.
At the heart of this Act is the most fundamental question we must ask ourselves as a free people: is 9/11 worth the Republic? The question screaming at us through this bill is whether the war on terror is a better model around which to shape our destiny than our constitutional liberties. It compels the question of whether we remain an ongoing experiment in democracy, pioneering new frontiers in the name of liberty and justice for all, or have we become a national security state, having financially corrupted and militarized our democracy to such an extent that we define ourselves, as Sparta did, only through the exigencies of war?
Within a week of 9/11, the Use of Military Force Act was approved which authorized the full application of U.S. military power against “terrorism.” A month later, on Oct. 26, 2001, Congress overwhelmingly passed the Patriot Act that began the legislative assault on the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment right to freedom of association was gutted as federal officials were authorized to prosecute citizens for alleged association with “undesirable groups.” The Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search and seizure was compromised by permitting indefinite detentions of those suspected of “terrorism.” The Fourteenth Amendment right to privacy was obliterated as unchecked surveillance was authorized to access personal records, financial dealings, and medical records of any citizen at any time without any judicial oversight or permission. Evidence obtained extra-judicially could be withheld from defense attorneys.
The Patriot Act also criminalized “domestic terrorism.” It stated that civil conduct can be considered “domestic terrorism” if such actions aim to “influence by intimidation or coercion” or “intimidate or coerce a civilian population.” Put in plain language, this means that actions such as Occupy Wall Street can be designated as “domestic terrorism” by Federal authorities without judicial oversight and dealt with outside the due process of constitutional protections.
Two weeks after passage of the Patriot Act, on Nov. 13, President Bush issued Military Order No. 1 authorizing the executive branch and the military to capture, kidnap, or otherwise arrest non-citizens anywhere in the world if suspected of engaging in terrorist activities. Proof was not required. It stipulated that trials, if held, would be military tribunals, not civil courts, and that evidence obtained by torture was permissible. No right of appeal was afforded to those convicted. Numerous executive orders, findings, and National and Homeland Security Presidential Directives followed, further consolidating the militarization of due process under the law and enabling the executive branch to act without legal constraint after it has defined a person or group as potentially engaging in “terrorist” activity.
A year later, on Nov. 25, 2002, the Homeland Security Act was passed that for the first time integrated all U.S. intelligence agencies, both domestic and foreign, into a single interactive network under the president. The Act gave these intelligence agencies complete freedom to collect any and all data on anyone anywhere in the United States and, working with allies abroad, to access complete information on anyone anywhere in the world, working closely with local police, intelligence agencies, and the corporate sector. This dissolved the distinctions between domestic and foreign spying and made more ambiguous the distinction between domestic and foreign “terrorism.”
The next major step took place on Oct. 17, 2006, when Congress passed the Military Commissions Act that effectively abrogated habeas corpus for domestic and foreign enemies alike, stating, “Any person is punishable who aides, abets, counsels, commands, or procures” material support for alleged terrorist groups. One of the most basic principles of both our democracy and our civilization, that a person cannot be held without being charged, was surrendered, and done so by substantial majorities in both houses. On the same day, the 2007 NDAA was passed, which amended the 1807 Insurrection Act and 1878 Posse Comitatus Act, prohibiting U.S. military personnel from acting upon U.S. citizens within U.S. borders. Not only was anything allowable in the pursuit of “terrorists,” but the military was authorized to conduct operations inside the homeland in their pursuit.
Now comes the 2012 NDAA, which completes the process and thus serves as the coup de grace for a democratically voted metamorphosis from republic to national security state. It puts the final nail in the coffin of the Constitution by designating the entire United States as essentially the same “battlefield” in the war on terror as Iraq or Afghanistan, and authorizes the executive branch and the military to take whatever actions they consider legitimate against any human being anywhere on planet earth, civilian or enemy combatant, and to do so without any judicial oversight or constitutional constraint. If this Act is passed, the Bill of Rights will no longer protect American citizens from their government. The Constitution will no longer be the ultimate law of the land.
The House and Senate versions of the Act must now be reconciled and the Act sent to the president to either sign or veto. With his decision, he will determine the fate of those very liberties which, up to this point, have been integral to and indeed have defined America.

20111215-181926.jpg

Reposted fromSigalontech Sigalontech

November 13 2011

Egypt: Plight of Bloggers Continues at Military Courts

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

A military court today decided to jail blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah for another 15 days, 15 days after first detaining him, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges. Blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad's trial was also once again postponed until November 27.

Abd El Fattah was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecution, in protest against its legitimacy. His arrest, and the international outcry it has caused, is shedding light on the plight of more than 12,000 civilians, including Sanad, who have been put on military trials in Egypt since the the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) took power. Abd El Fattah is accused of inciting violence against the military, stealing a weapon and destroying military equipment during the October 9 Maspero massacre, in which 25 Egyptians, mostly Copts, were killed in clashes between the military poilce and protesters demanding answers for the burning of churches in Sohag and Aswan.

Supporters wrote freedom for alaa abd el fattah on the ground outside the military prosecution building in cairo. photo by nazly hussein, posted on twitter

Supporters wrote Freedom for Alaa Abd El Fattah on the ground outside the Military Prosecution building in Cairo. Photo by Nazly Hussein, posted on Twitter

Abd El Fattah's trial coincided with Sanad's - Egypt's first blogger to be arrested and charged by a military court after the revolution which ousted Hosni Mubarak as president. Sanad was sentenced to three years in prison, for writing a post on his blog, which the military said was insulting.

The charges against Sanad are insulting the armed forces, publishing false information on his blog and disturbing public security. Last month, the Supreme Military Court of Appeals annulled the conviction but continued to hold Sanad, who had started a hunger strike, transferring him to a mental health facility.

Back in prison, Sanad continued with his hunger strike and his defiance to accept being subjected to the trial of a military court, a stance similar to Abd El Fattah's.

Today's rulings are seen by many as yet another blow for free speech and human rights in post-revolutionary Egypt.

The Big Pharaoh sums up the day:

@TheBigPharoah: Alaa refused to recognize the military court legitimacy, #MaikelNabil told his lawyers not to speak. Respect. #FreeAlaa

Rasha Abdulla adds:

@RashaAbdulla: Alaa Abdel fattah gets another 15 days in prison pending investigation. MaikelNabil postponed to Nov 27. Min of defence detainees acquitted

At first, news emerged that the Military Prosecutor dropped one of the charges from Abd El Fattah's accusations - that of stealing a weapon.

Alfred Raouf tweets:

@Kemety: will be detained for another 15 days, they dropped accusation of stealing weapons. He still refused recognizing the court.

And Azza Shaaban explains [ar]:

رغم اسقاط تهمة سرقة السلاح عن علاء عبدالفتاح لكن تهم التحريض واتلاف والتجمهر واستخدام القوة لسه لم تسقط
@Azza_Shaaban: Even though the charge of stealing a weapon has been dropped from Alaa Abd El Fattah, the charges of inciting violence, gathering, destruction of property and the use of force still remain

It then turns out that the judge “forgot” to turn the charge sheet to the next page.

Sultan Al Qassemi reports:

@SultanAlQassemi: Egypt Military Prosecutor: 's charge of “stealing army weapons” remains. Judge “forgot” to turn the charge sheet.

Farah Saafan notes:

@FarahSaafan: A Military Council that issues official statements on FB with judges that forget 2 turn pages during trials & can't protect minorities= SCAF

And Moutaz Dawood adds [ar]:

وبتجديد حبس علاء عبالفتاح .. يثبت المجلس العسكرى أنه لايجيد التفاوض ولا المرواغه .. ادواته الوحيده القضاء العسكرى والشرطه العسكريه
@Moutaz_D: By renewing Alaa Abd El Fattah's detention, SCAF proves that it doesn't master the art of negotition and that its only tools are military trials and military police

Meanwhile, Nazly Hussein reports about a defiant Abd El Fattah emerging out of court [ar]:

علاء خرج دلوقتي و هتف يسقط يسقط حكم العسكر من جوة البوكس

@nazlyhussein: Alaa just left and chanted: “Down Down with Military Rule” from inside the police jeep

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Egypt: Why Free Blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah?

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

A graffiti of alaa abd el fattah which reads: don't forget me. photo by bassem sabry

A graffiti of Alaa Abd El Fattah which reads: Don't forget me. Photo by Bassem Sabry

A military court judge will decide today whether Alaa Abd El Fattah will be released or will spend another 15 days behind bars, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges. He is accused of inciting violence against the military, stealing arms and damaging military property.

Abd El Fattah was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecution, in protest against its legitimacy. His arrest, and the international outcry it has caused, is shedding light on the plight of more than 12,000 civilians, who have been put on military trials in Egypt since the the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) took over.

On Twitter, supporters have been rallying for his freedom under the hashtag #WhyFreeAlaa . Here is a selection of some of the tweets under this hashtag.

Mostafa Rafat tweets:

@llvllostafa: #WhyFreeAlaa cuz he is in prison instead of me & u

Ahmad moein shares a similar sentiment:

@ahmadmoein: #WhyFreeAlaa because you're next!

S K adds:

@nolesfan2011: #whyfreealaa because he's a hero, he's innocent and he's my friend one of the most inspiring people I know

Hussein Adel Fahmy admits [ar]:

عشان أقوله أسف أنى كنت واخد فكرة غلط عنك تماما قبل الثورة..
@7usfahmy: So that I can apologise to him because I had a completely wrong impression about him before the revolution

And his sister Mona Seif, who has been championing against the military trial of civilians, since the beginning of the revolution, tweets:

@Monasosh: #WhyFreeAlaa coz I really miss u and I am tired of pretending it's easy

Columnist Mona Eltahawy sums it up:

@monaeltahawy: #WhyFreeAlaa Because he makes #Egypt better.

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Egypt: Free Speech on Military Trial in Post-Revolution Egypt

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Bloggers and freedom of speech and human rights defenders are holding their breath as Egypt's military courts decide the fate of two bloggers today. Maikel Nabil Sanad's trial continues today. Also, a military court judge will decide whether Alaa Abd El Fattah will be released or will spend another 15 days behind bars, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges.

Louisa Loveluck reminds us:

@leloveluck: Important day for freedom of speech in : court ruling and Abdelfattah investigation both taking place.

Sarrah Abdelrahman explains:

@sarrahsworld: today is critical. Maikel Nabil court ruling. Alaa Abdelfattah investigation

Hossam Eid calls on supporters to turn up at the hearing. He tweets:

@EidH: If you could show up at S28 in support with Alaa and all the military trailed Egyptians that would be great

And Rasha Abdulla is on her way to the trial, accompanied by Abd El Fattah's nine-month pregnant wife Manal Hassan, to C28, the headquarters of the military prosecutors:

@RashaAbdulla: Will now pick up to S28 where Alaa's case will be tried. join us at Nasr city near microbus stop

Both Sanad and Abd El Fattah refuse to acknowledge the military court trying them. Sanad was arrested days after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as the president of Egypt, and was sentenced in April to three years in prison for posts he published on his blog.

The charges against Sanad are insulting the armed forces, publishing false information on his blog and disturbing public security. Last month, the Supreme Military Court of Appeals annulled the conviction but continued to hold Sanad, who had started a hunger strike, transferring him to a mental health facility.

Back in prison, Sanad continued with his hunger strike and his defiance to accept being subjected to the trial of a military court, a stance similar to Abd El Fattah, who was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecutor, in protest against its legitimacy. Abd El Fattah is accused of inciting violence against the military, overtaking armed forces weapons and damaging military equipment.

Since January 28, more than 12,000 civilians have been put on military trials in Egypt.

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

November 11 2011

ROG fordert Ende der Verfolgung von Bloggern in Ägypten

Reporter ohne Grenzen hat heute eine Petition gestartet, die unsere Unterstützung benötigt.

In Ägypten werden Blogger und Dissidenten weiterhin verfolgt und inhaftiert, weil sie berichten und ihre Meinung äußern.Die Petition von ROG fordert die Einstellung der Verfolgung von Internetdissidenten sowie die umgehende und bedingungslose Freilassung der ägyptischen Blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad und Alaa Abdel Fattah.

Spread The Word!

October 30 2011

Egypt: Blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah Detained for 15 Days

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Activist and blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah has been detained for 15 days, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecutor, in protest against its legitimacy.

He appeared at the Military Prosecutor, along with fellow activist Bahaa Saber, today as supporters gathered outside, denouncing military trials. Since January 28, more than 12,000 civilians have been tried by military courts in Egypt. Abd El Fattah has since been transferred to prison, while Saber will soon be released.

Both activists were imprisoned in 2006 under Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Sharif Kouddous notes:

@sharifkouddous: Unbelievable. @alaa and Bahaa get 15 days detention sparking outrage from supporters outside

Bahaa Saber, left, and Alaa Abd El Fattah outside the court earlier today. Photo by Sharif Kouddous

Lawyer Gamal Eid tweets the allegations against Alaa, Bahaa and Mina Daniel, who was killed in the October 9 Maspero massacre. He writes [ar]:

الاتهامات الموجهة للنشطاء: التحريض التجمهر والاستيلاء على سلاح للقوات المسلحة ، واتلاف منشأت عسكرية

@gamaleid: The activists are accused of: instigating gatherings, overtaking the armed forces weapons and damaging military equipment

He adds:

علاء سيف رفض التحقيق من النيابة العسكرية باعتبارها تابعة للجيش ، والجيش نفسه متهم في الجريمة وبالتلي لا يجوز لمتهم ان يحقق مع متهم أخ

@gamaleid: Alaa Seif refused to be interrogated by the Military Prosecutor because it is part of the army and the army itself is accused in the crime. It is illegal for an accused to interrogate another accused party

Alaa's sister Mona Seif notes [ar]:

علاء و بهاء موقفهم كان قوي لأنهم رفضوا يعترفوا بشرعية النيابة العسكرية

@Monasosh: Alaa and Bahaa's stance was strong because they refused to acknowledge the legitimacy of the military prosecutor.

Mohamed Abdelfattah reacts:

@mfatta7: Salutations to the courage of @alaa as he refuses 2b interrogated by the military authority he is actually accusing.

Jonathan Rashad adds:

@JonathanRashad: It's kind of ironic to see @alaa facing mil prosecution fall 2011 when his sister @Monasosh has been fighting mil trials since spring 2011.

And Jonathan Moremi asks:

@Jonamorem: What about the promise not to try civilians in front of military court anymore, Tantawi? Is lying all #SCAF can do? #FreeAlaa #noMilTrials

Along with many others, Gigi Ibrahim is livid Daniel is among those accused. She tweets:

@Gsquare86: They killed Mina Daniel and he is dead and they are charging him of “inciting violence” ?!!! #WTF #SCAF has gone metal

At the time this post was published, Bahaa Saber was still being interrogated.

Mona Seif tweeted [ar]:

بهاء صابر لسة التحقيق معاه مأخلصش
@Monasosh: Bahaa Saber is still being interrogated. He is not done yet.

Further Reading:

Egyptian Blogger's Summons Adds Fuel to Campaign Against Military Trials

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

October 27 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Egyptian Activists: We Are Happy to See Occupy Wall Street Movement Stand Up For Justice - YouTube

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Uploaded by yt-account democracynow on Oct 27, 2011

www.democracynow.org - A pair of Egyptian police officers were sentenced Wednesday to eight years in prison for the beating death of 28 year-old man. The 2010 killing of Khaled Said helped to spark the Egyptian revolution that ultimately toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak. The officers were both charged with manslaughter. Members of Said's family and pro-democracy protesters argued the sentence was too light. Two Egyptian youth leaders, Ahmed Maher and Basem Fathy, are interviewed on Democracy Now! about Egypt after the fall of Mubarak, as well as the growing protests they have witnessed n the United States. "Regarding the Occupy movement ... we are — in the April 6th Movement and the activists in Egypt — standing for very clear values: social justice and democracy, and justice in general," says Fathy. "We're going to support this everywhere, and let's say frankly, that we're happy for finding the people trying to correct the bad way of democracy, even in the United States."

For the complete transcript, podcast, and for additional Democracy Now! reports on the Egyptian revolution and the Occupy movement sweeping the U.S. and around the world, visit http://www.democracynow.org
Reposted by99percent 99percent

October 26 2011

Egyptian Blogger's Summons Adds Fuel to Campaign Against Military Trials

Photo of Alaa Abd El Fattah from personaldemocracy on Flickr (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Alaa Abd El Fattah, a well-known Egyptian blogger and activist who was imprisoned in 2006 under the Mubarak regime, learned on Monday that he has been summoned by a military prosecutor. Though he was expected to face the prosecutor today, his summons was postponed until Sunday, when he returns from the United States, where he's speaking at a conference on technology and human rights.  According to a tweet, he suspects that he will be charged with incitement to violence and destruction of public property.

According to Al Masry Al Youm, a video blogger has claimed to have video evidence against Alaa that shows him throwing stones on October 9 and alleges that the blogger incited violence during the massacre of Coptic Christians that took place that day.  The video, posted to YouTube, contains no evidence to support the claims. In contrast, Al Masry Al Youm states that it witnessed Alaa assissting the wounded following protests on October 9.

The New York Times also reported on the situation, stating that Alaa's father is “‘not worried' about the fact that his son faces interrogation by a military prosecutor.”

Alaa, who recently attended the Third Arabloggers Meeting in Tunis, spoke Tuesday at the Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference in San Francisco (which he had scheduled prior to knowledge of his interrogation), mentioning the case of jailed blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad and reiterating the call for an end to military trials in Egypt:

Let me take 30 seconds to speak out against extra-ordinary justice. I’m going to be facing it when I get back to Egypt, in front of our military government. Here you should be familiar with extraordinary justice, as it was practiced in Guantanamo.  There are roughly 12,000 civilians in military prison right now, for participating in a revolution the military pretends to have sided with, and sometimes it is for events in which the military committed the crimes, not civilians. I urge you to find ways to stand with anyone facing this future.

Since January 28, more than 12,000 civilians have been tried by military courts in Egypt.  A growing campaign demands an end to military trials, echoing Alaa's claim of extraordinary justice.  International groups such as Human Rights Watch have spoken out against the actions of the Supreme Council of Armed Forces, stating that the prosecutions demonstrate ” how Egypt’s military rulers are undermining the transition to democracy.”  The Christian Science Monitor noted that “not a single prosecution has been made in cases of military abuse and torture this year in which the Army promised investigations.”

Under SCAF rule, free expression is not a right, echoing for many life under the Mubarak regime.  In July, Asmaa Mahfouz was interrogated over a tweet, while blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad has been imprisoned since April and on hunger strike since August.

For his part, Alaa has asked that those wishing to support him stand against military trials in Egypt:

 

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