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August 02 2013

TERRA 816: Reduce Reuse Recycle-tron

Bjorn, a surly viking transported to the present through mysterious circumstances, must come to terms with Resource Conservation (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) through the expert coaching of high school students Brenda and Mickey, and their biology teacher, Mr. Wilson. The film is composed of two parts: a narrative and a music video, both overlain with motion graphics. These films were shown to focus groups of 6th-8th grade students to test the educational value and appeal of music videos and motion graphics. This film was sponsored by the Mr. Rogers Memorial Scholarship. Produced by Seth Ring.

July 05 2013

TERRA 814: The Hudson River Clearwater Revival - Part 2

A group of middle school students sets sail on the Hudson River, aboard the Clearwater tall ship to learn about chemical water pollution. Produced by Hilary Hudson

June 21 2013

The Hudson River Clearwater Revival - Part 1

A group of middle school students sets sail on the Hudson River, aboard the Clearwater tall ship to learn about chemical water pollution. Produced by Hilary Hudson

June 22 2012

Artists of tomorrow rediscover paint's potential

This year's degree shows are teeming and eclectic, but the startling change is the number of promising painters

The lofty central space of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's architectural masterpiece, Glasgow School of Art, is like a Viking hall that has been civilised by soft lines and fine wood. Only, the dark supple beams of this beautiful meeting place have been taken over by a new breed of barbarians: artists.

What kind of student must Mackintosh have imagined working in the sublime studios he built at the start of the 20th century? Probably not one like Rory Price, who has three paintings hanging in the grand hall for this year's degree show. One is called Clusterfuck Concerto Aged 22. It is an explosion of ideas bursting out of a pot, as if released by a spell. He goes for quantity, which in his case does not preclude quality.

In a corridor just off the main hall Price's smaller pictures – dozens of them – are hung in a crazy rag and bone shop of the human heart. They are crazy and likeable. In an adjacent studio, Max Heath shows a portrait that is a surreal pastiche of the 20th century German artist Max Beckmann – A Poor Self Trait.

Art students probably never lived up to the lofty ideals Mackintosh's building seems to demand: it is unlikely they ever did waft through his corridors like so many ethereal roses. In Alasdair Gray's autobiographical fantasia Lanark, a student here in the mid-20th century dreams of creating vast murals. In the 1990s the college produced such students as Douglas Gordon and Christine Borland. This year the crop is as wild as ever. It is striking that some of the most audacious works are paintings and that painting seems once again to be a visual language in which young artists want to experiment and express themselves.

In a tramshed near King's Cross, London, two graduating Central St Martin's students, Isabel Francis Harvey and August Carpenter, have hung strongly contrasting paintings in the same booth. Harvey's are absurdist portraits, such as a dog wearing glasses. Carpenter's are precise yet unreal forms, like genetically mutated fruits from the future. What they share is a lot of assurance.

Their works show the variety of ways in which, on my trail through this year's degree shows, I found the artists of tomorrow taking on the potential of good old pencils and paints. Upstairs in the college's shiny new building, Alison Griffin exhibits a brilliantly detailed and authoritative drawing of a spooky old house. Kim Nazarko shows three haunting paintings of an unconscious man – asleep, ill or dying? These two artists are curious and memorable.

I am not pushing a line here, don't get me wrong, this is not some conservative return to painting at our art schools. The 2012 degree shows are teeming and eclectic, and these baby artists are being creative in an almost infinite variety of media. Look behind Nazarko's paintings at Central and a low wooden doorway tempts you to enter a dark, confined space. To stand up you have to stick your head through a hole in the ceiling – and when you do, you're in a decorated interior a couple of feet high, papered with flowery wallpaper, and brightly lit. Yifan Gao's installation is hilarious disconcerting and immaculately realised.

The range of artistic possibilities explored in the degree shows is glorious and delightfully mindboggling. If you want to see a holographic cabaret, a giant hourglass that measures coastal erosion, a homage to Carl Andre's bricks, a mirrored obelisk, an inflated fabric tube that looks like a Mondrian intestine, a collection of homemade weapons that recall the designs of Leonardo da Vinci, a porn montage, an interactive digital mirror … watch this space.

The shock prize probably has to be shared by Glasgow's Geneva Sills, for a photograph called Self-Portrait with Dead Nude, and Chelsea's Vanessa Scully, for her version of Driller Killer set in the east London art world. This latter is an actual acted remake, 74 minutes long, of Abel Ferrara's notorious 1979 horror film. You can't deny it is unusual.

Horror seems to attract students at Chelsea: if the Glasgow school is an architectural classic, Chelsea's converted military hospital includes a morgue and other spooky rooms that students populate with site-responsive hauntings. What caught my attention was the ghostly voice of art historian Kenneth Clark, in fragments from his 1969 TV series Civilisation, that are juxtaposed with tasty clips from old films in a video installation by Naomi Jones-Morris.

What marks out the best new graduates, in whatever media or none, tends to be a precision and self-knowledge about what they are doing. This is to look at them from the point of view of an art critic – that is, to look for people who might be around for years to come on the art scene. To be a professional artist takes vision, purpose, clarity. I saw strong examples of those traits across the degree shows in all media and (to use the art school terminology) "practices".

But the startling change from last year's shows is undoubtedly the number of promising painters. Where have they all come from? Last year I saw hardly any paintings worth looking at in any of the degree exhibitions. This year there's no doubt that some of the best work was done on paper and canvas, with charcoals and pigments. Which is definitely not to decry Driller Killer E2.


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October 27 2011

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2011-10-26 - Growing Gap, with Robert Reich - Countdown with Keith Olbermann - Occupy movement
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June 21 2011

Education letters

From Hackney Downs to AC Grayling

Michael Barber's CV

It was nice to learn that Michael Barber is making world-class money working for Pearson (Mad professor goes global, 14 June). But it's sad that he is still quoted as defending the closure of Hackney Downs school in 1995 as some kind of triumph. The hurried closure of the school in December 1995 had a disastrous effect on the education of many of the boys, especially those in their final GCSE year. The history of the closure is one of educational neglect, political machinations and deionisation of the school, teachers, students and their families. Perhaps Barber was right to boast that the stand taken became the foundation of New Labour's education policy. It could stand as a metaphor for the increase in inequalities in the education system and the continuing punitive measures aimed at schools in poorer areas.

Professor Sally Tomlinson

University of Oxford

• Peter Wilby misses one of Michael Barber's greatest successes. Barber was also a member of Lord Browne's review of higher education funding. He was not the only horse out of the McKinsey stable involved in the review. There was also Peter Sands, the CEO of Standard Chartered Bank, who spent 13 years at McKinsey. Indeed, there are many of us who believe that Browne's report would have been much more honestly entitled "the McKinsey report", but this would have drawn attention to the privatisation agenda underlying its recommendations.

Professor John Newsinger

Bath Spa University

No loss of jobs

Yup, James Dyson is the obvious choice to spearhead the revival of British manufacturing by repurposing design technology education ('It's not about banging nails into wood', 14 June). You conjure up problems: disappointment that the wheel on your wheelbarrow is not a bright orange plastic football; the frustration of not being able to watch the muck you've hoovered up whizzing round inside the machine. And then, having built a business out of that, you dump a big chunk of your workforce and send their jobs overseas. To me "British manufacturing" means people employed in the UK, paying UK taxes to finance, among other things, design technology education.

Root Cartwright

Radlett, Hertfordshire

Student complaints

Sue Littlemore asked whether vice-chancellors are becoming heads of customer sevices, following a rise in student complaints.

When you pay, you've got rights to complain. When you pay a lot, you've got rights to complain a lot.

jekylnhyde via EducationGuardian.co.uk

• Student anger should be directed at the government, which has cut university funding and is making students pick up the bill. The universities will have no more money, while being expected to deliver enhanced services.

coffeetable via EducationGuardian.co.uk

A set-up?

Harriet Swain wrote a step-by-step guide to starting your own university in the manner of AC Grayling.

I find it difficult to see what the fuss is all about. AC Grayling is only doing this to highlight the cuts that humanities departments have suffered.

beth23 via EducationGuardian.co.uk

• A perfect skewering. (I'm still chuckling as I'm typing.)

2baz via EducationGuardian.co.uk

• Journalism of the lowest order.

Lionel via EducationGuardian.co.uk


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May 23 2011

Beauty Is in the Street: the power of protest posters

A new book reminds us of powerful, unifying posters designed by students during the May 1968 Paris uprising. But where are the design campaigns from the youth of today?

Three years ago the media marked the 40th anniversary of the May 1968 Paris uprising with a wave of nostalgic reminiscence. There may have been a nice round number to celebrate, but that was about all there was connecting us to the spirit of '68. Three years later, following a banking-triggered recession and the election of a right-wing government, that spirit seems to have been exhumed. We've seen students occupy universities across the UK, and hundreds of thousands march against government spending cuts. In many ways this is a more propitious moment to release a beautiful volume of the posters created by the Atelier Populaire, and Four Corners Books has done just that.

While their fellow students engaged in pitched battles with the police and millions of workers went on general strike, students at the École des Beaux Arts in 1968 occupied the printing studios and converted them into the uprising's very own propaganda machine. Many of the resulting posters have become icons of political design. The riot policeman bearing down on the viewer with his truncheon aloft, his head helmeted and goggled in a ghoulish mask, has become synonymous with oppression.

By contrast, the long-haired student hurling a cobblestone, which appears to be floating harmlessly in the air, aestheticises resistance as a liberating act. The poster's slogan translates as "Beauty Is in the Street". The book takes that as its title, with these two images as its front and back covers.

The Atelier Populaire may have been a group of art students but – high on the fumes of Marxism – they decried the privileged, bourgeois art world. Out in the real world, they had a job to do. They set up a silk-screen printing press (much faster than the lithography presses in the studios they'd occupied) and worked around the clock in shifts. That way, they could produce thousands of posters at a time, to be slapped up around the city. They were not art, but tools, weapons even. In the frontispiece to a 1969 book of the posters reproduced here, the Atelier Populaire wrote: "To use them for decorative purposes, to display them in bourgeois places of culture or to consider them as objects of aesthetic interest is to impair both their function and their effect." Well, it's too late for that – they are nothing now if not objects of aesthetic interest.

The posters display different styles but the individual designers were never credited (too bourgeois) – they were the work of the collective. What they had in common was an economy of expression: single colours printed on newssheet gifted by the striking newspapers, bold forms and provocative slogans. What stands out today is an extremely concise iconography.

The factory, with its saw-toothed roof and chimney, symbolises the worker's productive role in society, and the spanner his honest labour. The fist is the students' symbol of solidarity and resistance. The real success of May '68 – and arguably its only achievement – was the alliance of these unlikely groups. And so in one poster the chimney becomes the fist. In another, the worker and student stand arm in arm. Often the figures are silhouettes, not just because they are more graphic but also to condense the many into one unified body. Perhaps the strongest poster of all is a six-headed silhouette that reads "We are the power".

The iconography for the forces of oppression, conservatism and capitalism are equally straightforward. There are chains and truncheons and rats and, of course, the long-nosed profile of President De Gaulle. What were the students opposing? What started with a complaint about the old-fashioned regulations at Nanterre University became a battle cry against establishment values and consumer culture – or what the Situationists called "the spectacle". Georges Perec had parodied that culture in his 1965 novel Things, and one example of graffiti here (to its credit the book includes many photographs of the graffiti as well as the posters of this time) reads "L'homme fait l'amour avec la Chose": "Man makes love to the Thing."

Today, the Marxist fervour may have died down but flare-ups against capitalist forces persist. The question is, where is the political design? There was the odd hand-drawn poster at the UCL occupation in December but no organised design campaign to compare with '68. Perhaps graphics were a device that the students didn't need. With Twitter and Facebook and mobile phones to hand, the poster is a less exponential way of mobilising support. Which also suggests that protest today relies more on the telegraphic soundbite than the graphic image – an ironic conclusion given that ours is an age in thrall to pictures.

There remains a counter-cultural graphics, but when it is political it is rarely ideologically so. Banksy's street art adopts a vaguely anti-establishment stance but it is individualistic rather than collective. Similarly, Shepard Fairey's famous "Obey" posters warn against the power of advertising, and yet his explicitly political works give the impression that they are merely endorsements of personality politics. The "Hope" election poster for Obama and his images of other figures such as Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi pursue the Che T-shirt model of iconisation. And this leaves aside the fact that both Banksy and Fairey are commercial artists, whereas the Atelier Populaire refused to allow its posters to be sold and thus commodified.

The UK's political graphics tend to be more stealthy and insidious. Take that odd phenomenon, the "Keep Calm and Carry On" poster that has been ubiquitous since the credit crunch. In its appeal to the plucky stoicism of the blitz years, it seems designed to dampen down any unrest aimed at the political-financial establishment. Or think back to the Conservative election campaign. Remember those posters featuring David Cameron's heavily Photoshopped face with the slogan "We can't go on like this"? The dewy ruddiness of Cameron's cheeks, the vagueness of that "this", such is the true nature of political image-making in our time: no bold graphics or progressive rhetoric, just the subtle massaging of the truth into a digestible advert.


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May 07 2011

TERRA 607: Students Saving the Ocean

STUDENTS SAVING THE OCEAN tells the story of the how the conservation community in the Bay Area comes together to improve the health and environment of the California coasts. ;Students lead the charge to explain how everyday decisions have a big impact on our oceans.
TERRA 607: Students Saving the Ocean

STUDENTS SAVING THE OCEAN tells the story of the how the conservation community in the Bay Area comes together to improve the health and environment of the California coasts. ;Students lead the charge to explain how everyday decisions have a big impact on our oceans.

March 23 2011

Which posters once adorned your walls? | Open thread

They may be cheesy but your old posters could soon be deemed a work of art if the Athena 'tennis girl' is anything to go by

The image of a knickerless beauty striding across a tennis court became one of the most popular posters of the 1970s, adorning the bedroom walls of teenage boys around the world and selling a total of 2m copies worldwide. The poster has now been framed by the Birmingham Barber Institute of Fine Arts and will feature alongside paintings by LS Lowry, David Hockney and Stanley Spencer in an exhibition on the theme of lawn tennis later this year.

But while "the tennis girl" may have moved into the upper echelons of cultural recognition, the market for teenage and student posters continues to produce an array of designs with often dubious artistic merit. Among those tacked to university dorm walls today include the popular "Beer – helping ugly people have sex since 1862" design, the "Oh shit" cat falling off a tree and the "student crossing" sign complete with inebriated stick man. These follow in the same perhaps frivolous line of past popular posters such as the topless male model with accompanying baby, the classic 1970s Lord of the Rings illustration and chimp on the toilet covered in loo paper.

So which cheesy posters will you admit to owning in your teenage and student years? Did you tack the iconic image of Che Guevara to your walls, stick posters of the Smiths to your pinboard, or were you more of a Just Seventeen pull-out sort?


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February 10 2011

In the mood for love

The Dutch photographer's groundbreaking book – just reprinted – captures the birth of rebellious youth culture in 1950s Europe, blending reportage with seductive fantasy

See a gallery of photographs from the reissued book here

Ed van der Elsken's groundbreaking book of photographs, Love on the Left Bank, first published in a small edition in 1954, has been reprinted by the small British publisher, Dewi Lewis. This is a cause for celebration. It is a classic of its kind – grainy, monochrome cinéma vérité – and one of the first photobooks to record the nascent flowering of rebellious youth culture in Europe.

Set in and around the hinterland between Odéon and St Germain-des-Prés, shot in black and white, the book is an impressionistic narrative that centres on a fictional character, Ann, a beautiful and enigmatic bohemian, and her circle of vagabond friends, who haunt the bars, cafes and clubs of the area. Van der Elsken's camera trails Ann as she works as an exotic dancer, drinks, flirts, fights, sleeps, falls in and out of love.

Ann is actually the legendary bohemian figure Vali Myers, a self-exiled Australian artist, who was friends with Cocteau and Genet, and, by way of van der Elsken's evocative portraits of her, later became a muse for the teenage Patti Smith. When the two eventually met in New York in the early 1970s, Myers tattooed a lightning bolt on Smith's knee, while Smith described her as "the supreme beatnik chick – thick red hair and big black eyes, black boatneck sweaters and trench coats".

Love on the Left Bank is actually narrated by a relatively minor character called Manuel, a young Mexican on the run from his own demons, who falls for Ann and whose thoughts form the text that accompanies the pictures. The text, van der Elsken makes clear from the start, "is entirely fictional and is not related to any living person". The story of Manuel's unrequited love for Ann creates another layer of mystery, adding to the sense that this is a snapshot not just of a time and place, but of a mood, maybe even a collective state of mind. That mood could be described as the beatnik sublime, and van der Elsken captures the first stirrings of a kind of youthful non-conformity that would become much more familiar – and ritualised – in the coming decades.

The intimate portraits of Ann – daydreaming, dozing, stirring a coffee – are the still moments in an otherwise impressionistic, often frenetic, narrative. The characters in the book are constantly on the move, from cafe to bar, nightclub to jazz club, the streets of St Germain-des-Prés alive with young people in search of the next nocturnal high. The supporting cast of real-life characters includes Jean-Michel, Benny and Pierre, who look like stylish proto-punks and drift in and out of trouble without much thought for the consequences, getting drunk, getting high and, at one point, getting arrested for brawling on the street. Like Brassaï before him, van der Elsken is drawn to the symbolic as well as the impressionistic: in one portrait of Ann, she leans against a wall on which the word Rêve (Dream) has been painted: shades of the Situationist slogans that would transform Paris during the student uprising of 1968.

In one series of fly-on-the-wall photographs, van der Elsken captures Jean Michel teaching a girl to "smoke hashish in the right way … the cigarette not held in the mouth, the smoke inhaled together with air from the cupped hands". Jean Michel Mension would later become one of the main protagonists of the 1968 student uprising, a member of the Letterist International, to which the legendary Situationist activist and thinker, Guy Debord, also belonged. Legend has it that the back of Debord's head can be seen in one of the many bar scenes in the book.

Ed van der Elsken's Love on the Left Bank is important for many reasons, then: as an early reflection of youth cultural ennui, disaffection and rebellion; as a glimpse of a particular place and time when Parisian culture, specifically its youth culture, was on the cusp of a great sea change; as one of the first visual narratives that walks the line between fly-on-the-wall reportage and created narrative.

Vali Myers went on to become an opium addict, then an artist of some repute. She lived for a time in her own personal "Garden of Eden", a small house with a rambling garden in Positano. She is the subject of four films, one, Death in the Port Jackson Hotel, made in 1971 by van der Elsken. She died of cancer, aged 72, in 2003 in her native Melbourne. In a newspaper interview, given from her hospital bed, she said, "I've had 72 absolutely flaming years. It [the illness] doesn't bother me at all, because, you know love, when you've lived like I have, you've done it all."

Van der Elsken went on to produce several brilliant books and to embrace colour photography in order to capture the vitality of his native Holland, but he was never at ease with the world of commercial photography.

Love on the Left Bank, his first and most groundbreaking book, remains his most beautifully realised body of work. He died of cancer, aged 65, in 1990. He once said, "I report on young, rebellious scum with pleasure … I rejoice in everything. Love. Courage. Beauty. Also blood, sweat and tears. Keep your eyes open."

Now see this

The British photographer Vanessa Winship has a kind of retrospective at the Galerie Vu in Paris until 19 March. Well worth a visit to see her arresting portraits of teenagers and schoolchildren taken over the last 10 years mainly in rural areas of the Balkans, Turkey and Caucasia. Anyone familiar with her beautiful and intimate book, Sweet Nothings, will know what to expect: gentle, intriguing, elusive portraits that touch on notions of identity, experience and belonging in a fragmenting world.


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November 11 2010

The thrilling truth about protest photo

That so many papers chose the same picture is a sign of our appetite for a rumble – the underside of our usual self-image

A hooded figure balances on one leg to kick at the last fractured pieces of an already holed and partially collapsed window, while gold and red flames glow behind this shady anti-hero of insurrection. This photograph from Wednesday's student protest is the image that has been chosen by many papers to illustrate what was intended, and was experienced by most students, as a peaceful march. Is it political manipulation to choose this picture instead of, say, a peaceful shot of smiling placard-wavers to put on front pages? Are the media exercising their nasty arts to make students look like a mob?

No. This image has made the front pages because it is exciting. Its violence is liberating to contemplate, in a dangerous, Dionysian way. The ancient Greeks mythologised the irrational, savage, destructive side of the human psyche in stories of the wine god Dionysus and his crazed followers. Down the centuries, pictures of social protest have summoned up those same wine-dark powers or recognised them in moments when the quiet of the city is turned inside out and all the suppressed antagonisms of daily life explode in riot.

The most famous painting of revolution, Eugène Delacroix's early 19th century masterpiece Liberty Leading the People, in the Louvre, is not the work of a political man but of a romantic: Delacroix was intoxicated by the sudden freedoms of the 1830 revolution in Paris in the same way he was intoxicated by fantasies of wild sex and decadence in his paintings of imagined Oriental harems.

Revolution is exhilarating to behold – whatever side you are on. This image will be interpreted differently by different people. Supporters of the government may find it chilling, official student leaders will be frustrated, some will feel a sombre conviction that this may just be the beginning of resistance to controversial policies. But in truth, all sides – from the suburban Tory shuddering at the image on the Telegraph front page to the student activist inspired to plan the next sit-in – will be a bit aroused. There is a satisfaction in the release of the repressed. Months of national debate that have veered from blandly soothing talk that "we are all in this together" to the muted despair of those who fear job losses, here explode into an image that after all tells the truth. Whatever the statistics – the small minority who fought the police, the many marchers whose right to peaceful protest was hijacked – this picture makes a simple fact instantly visible: we are not all in this together and the government is bringing in some deeply divisive measures.

In saying this I do not mean to score a political point. The mystery is why a picture like this appeals across the spectrum and has a thudding emotional, visceral power even if you are revulsed by the actions it portrays. In British cultural history, the Dionysian appetite for a rumble seems to be deeply engraved, as the shadow, the mirror, of our usual placid self-image. The very tranquillity of the way we so often portray ourselves – the village green, the pleasant parkland, the suburban gardens and homely homes – calls for a daemonic underside of national identity.

Unlike France, which has a long art history (and history) of revolution, we have a profound national iconography of riot. This can be traced back to 18th century prints of the Gordon Riots, but in modern times has become part of pop music and art. Punk was an aesthetic of riot, translated into high art by Gilbert and George. It was deeply British. Somehow, the saloon bar conservatives in country pubs needed the spectre of God Save the Queen as much as John Lydon needed them to be appalled. And here we are again: punk's not dead. This is not a scary picture, a propaganda image or cheap sensationalism but a thrilling, truthful picture that brings everyone's terrors and disturbing desires out into the open, onto the usually so peaceful streets.


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November 09 2010

02mydafsoup-01
Eine bemerkenswerte und merkwürdige europäische Regelung ist, dass es im Bildungsbereich keinen Länderausgleich gibt. So müssen Belgien und Österreich das Studium von vielen Studenten aus ihren größeren Nachbarländer bezahlen.
Wie schön, dass es Österreich gibt! | erlebt - Der Universitätsalltag eines Wissenschaftlers 20101109

September 18 2010

TERRA 539: Energy's Future

Energy's Future tells the story of Joules, a high school junior faced with the pressing decision about what to do after graduation. Joule's daily routine of work, classes, and friends leaves her little time to figure out what she ultimately wants for her life after high school. The lives of three college students working in different science fields intercut Joule's story. These college students aren't just reading textbooks. They are doing cutting edge research aimed at solving one of the biggest problems facing our world, the need to find renewable energy. Through interweaving stories, Energy's Future paints a picture of the transition of science and people, from students being taught in the high school classroom to students solving real world problems in the college lab. ;
TERRA 539: Energy's Future

Energy's Future tells the story of Joules, a high school junior faced with the pressing decision about what to do after graduation. Joule's daily routine of work, classes, and friends leaves her little time to figure out what she ultimately wants for her life after high school. The lives of three college students working in different science fields intercut Joule's story. These college students aren't just reading textbooks. They are doing cutting edge research aimed at solving one of the biggest problems facing our world, the need to find renewable energy. Through interweaving stories, Energy's Future paints a picture of the transition of science and people, from students being taught in the high school classroom to students solving real world problems in the college lab. ;

January 22 2009

September 05 2008

TERRA 444: Museum of the Rockies - Dino Diaries

Have you ever wondered how scientists look for dinosaur bones, or how they get these fossils safely out of the ground once they find them?

Find answers to these questions and more as students and paleontologists from the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana take you into the field on the latest episode from Terra, Dino Diaries

September 03 2008

TERRA 444: Museum of the Rockies - Dino Diaries PREVIEW

Have you ever wondered how scientists look for dinosaur bones, or how they get these fossils safely out of the ground once they find them?

Find answers to these questions and more as students and paleontologists from the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana take you into the field on the latest episode from Terra, Dino Diaries

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