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May 04 2011

02mydafsoup-01

April 29 2011

02mydafsoup-01

April 26 2011

Why war has spring in its step

The timing of the Taliban prison escape reminds us that war and springtime have been linked in art for centuries

News that 480 Taliban prisoners have escaped in time for this year's "fighting season" in Afghanistan is hardly something to be taken lightly. But the fact that this war has a fighting season is a strange reminder of the dark side of springtime. For centuries, before mechanised conflict, the seasonal nature of war was a familiar fact, recorded in famous works of art.

Paolo Uccello's early 15th-century painting The Battle of San Romano is a joyous depiction of war. It captures the brilliant colours and dramatic display of medieval chivalry in a bouncing carnival of tubular armoured bodies, hovering banners and prancing horses. In modern terms it is a lie, as any glorification of battle must be. But it is historically simplistic to dismiss the culture of chivalry, with its treatment of war as a beautiful game, as cynical. They simply saw things differently in those days. Uccello weaves a spell of martial spectacle. The way he does it is to root war in the landscape of Tuscan spring and early summer.

The Battle of San Romano was fought by Florentine and Sienese armies on 1 June 1432. In the three paintings that narrate this Florentine victory, Uccello stresses the seasonal delights of nature. Dogs chase hares across the fields; great round fruits glow orange among dark leaves on the trees, just as they do in Botticelli's Primavera (Spring).

The same abundance that graces Botticelli's allegory of spring proliferates in Uccello's pageant of battle. War is associated with the vitality of spring: it is a lusty natural rite in The Battle of San Romano.

Michelangelo's Battle of Cascina, by contrast, portrays a battle out of season. A 14th-century Florentine army was headed towards the enemy city Pisa on 28 July 1364. The war season had run into the heat of full Italian summer: instead of joyous springtime pilgrims, the soldiers were sweaty and faint inside their heavy armour. So they stripped and jumped in the river Arno for a swim – only for the alarm to be sounded. Michelangelo depicts the naked soldiers jumping out of the river. Where Uccello's vision of war might seem complacent, Michelangelo's is anxious and tense. The season is wrong, spring's promise has decayed into summer fever (the Florentine commander was apparently suffering from malaria). Nothing about war is comforting.

Perhaps a deeper change lies behind Michelangelo's image. When he designed it in the early 1500s, artillery was changing warfare. It was starting to be about guns rather than chivalry. Displays of banners and knights meant little when the cannon fired. Michelangelo portrays a new age when war can come at any time, and death obeys no rituals. Yet in the unique and difficult landscape of Afghanistan, it seems that ancient habits still apply.


guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2011 | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds


April 25 2011

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April 24 2011

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March 07 2011

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Spring is coming – catch the explosion on camera | Tanya Perdikou

Longer days means more chances to capture spring's wildlife – and why not enter the British Wildlife Photography Awards?

Share your signs of spring photographs on our Flickr group

Here at the Wildlife Trusts, we get very excited about the approach of spring. We relish the signs we see every day on nature reserves throughout the UK – the bursting of a blossom bud, the promise of a daffodil shoot yet to explode, the lurching of a toad through damp grass.

Suddenly things speed up, crocuses which have teetered on the brink of glory for so long are blazing out in violets, yellows and pinks. Parks, gardens and pavements carry human traffic once more, overzealous sun-worshippers bare their legs and lambs dance in the fields. There is much about spring to celebrate, and with longer daylight hours and wildlife much more visible, nature photographers can go to town.

Birds will be bustling for mates and territory, so consider trying to snap them as they perch on bare branches, singing to prove their worth. Flocks are on the move too: there's the chance to capture a murmuration of starlings like wisps of smoke, or the vibrant reds and golds of a charm of goldfinches.

Long, yellow catkins will be hanging down in profusion and, at their ripest, give off little clouds of pollen at the slightest disturbance. Capturing this nimbus of fertility is a challenge for any photographer.

Believe it or not, when woodlands roll out the bluebell carpet for spring, and other classic flowers break through the leafy slumber, cloud can be the photographers' best friend. Harsh sunlight can bleach or 'blow-out' white and blue flowers in particular – losing those subtle hues that make them our favourites. An overcast day will keep the saturation you need, but don't forget your shutter speed may be lower in a shady woodland so a tripod or sturdily held camera is a must.

Instead of going for that 'all-in' shot, why not get low among the flowers and look to pick out a few heads among the carpet – an aperture of f5.6 or less will have a great impact. Capture a feeling of tranquillity by framing your picture through the trees. Silver birches in particular can add a great dimension.

Reptiles are some of the most challenging creatures to photograph, but this is the best time to try, as lizards and adders wake from their winter hibernation from February onwards. A little research on the best areas for these scaly subjects should be followed with a site visit. Look for sandy, open paths or warm rocks and walls, where the cold-blooded critters will warm up before a day's hunting. Arrive before the sun gets too warm and they make their escape. Don't forget the adder is our only venomous snake – a longer lens allows you to keep your distance. Be sure to watch your step too.

Again, a day with some cloud cover will allow you to pick out the finer details. Eye contact can make or break your image, so whatever you get in focus, ensure the eyes are pin-sharp. With long bodies and heads, it is important to have plenty of depth-of-field, perhaps around f8 upwards to ensure you capture all those key features. Patience is a virtue, and waiting for that split second when a forked tongue pierces the air will make your trip worthwhile.

As competitions like the British Wildlife Photography Awards demonstrate, our appetite for wildlife images continues to grow. This year, the Wildlife Trusts are sponsoring the category 'Living Landscape: Connectivity'. We want to transform the UK into a living landscape, where wildlife thrives everywhere from urban centres to rivers and moors.

Never underestimate the importance of your images in achieving this. By capturing the captivating, elemental magic of spring, you are helping to kindle a connection with nature in people that can lead to a life-long bond.

• Tanya Perdikou works for the Wildlife Trusts


guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2011 | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds


May 02 2010

02mydafsoup-01
4917 55ca 500
@kitten, you are certainly acquainted with the  biergarden & restaurant Menterschweige - the fotograf you asked for and this one (both 20100424), with Solln - Siemenswerke  vis-à -vis - is done nearly at the same place at the eastern high banks from the Isar river.

oanth - muc - 20100503
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Fotograf made during a bike tour 24th of April in south of Munich along the Isar high banks - today the river, which the day was still to recognize between the branches, wouldn't be to see any more. - oanth


--------------------------------------------------------------------


Dear all (soup-users & @kitchen),

things are already going to recover and coming back to normal circumstances - at least I can post, repost, etc. in all directions again, and the RSS auto upload seems also to have restarted; I can't say to what extend for the moment, but the integration is on its way to come back to normal functionality - I helped myself still by manual activation, just to have faster results for the integration in my soup.

Concerning the notifications, I don't know how well they are doing up to the right moment, it's not yet observed enough. The login works for my soup without problems.

What remained obviously still unfixed is the mail service, what I feel as a sincere restriction for a certain kind of postings, which I am used to coordinate directly with my mail-client.

Thanks to the @kitchen for your precious time in maintaining the system to bring it back.


Best wishes for an agreable May sunday (evening)
with greetings from muc

by oanth ( CEST 16.30 20100502)

May 01 2010

02mydafsoup-01

Frühlingssehnsucht - Franz Schubert 1797-1828






Frühlingssehnsucht, Franz Schubert 1797-1828

Werner Güra, Tenor
Christoph Berner, Piano

yt permalink
yt account: Ablacsia

Text by Ludwig Rellstab (1799-1860)
Liedtext / song text with several translations EN, FR, ...
via http://www.recmusic.org



"Frühlingssehnsucht", D. 957 no. 3 (1828), from Schwanengesang, no. 3.

Säuselnde Lüfte wehend so mild
Blumiger Düfte atmend erfüllt!
Wie haucht ihr mich wonnig begrüßend an!
Wie habt ihr dem pochenden Herzen getan?
Es möchte euch folgen auf luftiger Bahn!
Wohin?

Bächlein, so munter rauschend zumal,
Wollen hinunter silbern ins Tal.
Die schwebende Welle, dort eilt sie dahin!
Tief spiegeln sich Fluren und Himmel darin.
Was ziehst du mich, sehnend verlangender Sinn,
Hinab?

Grüßender Sonne spielendes Gold,
Hoffende Wonne bringest du hold!
Wie labt mich dein selig begrüßendes Bild!
Es lächelt am tiefblauen Himmel so mild
Und hat mir das Auge mit Tränen gefüllt!
Warum?

Grünend umkränzet Wälder und Höh'!
Schimmernd erglänzet Blütenschnee!
So dränget sich alles zum bräutlichen Licht;
Es schwellen die Keime, die Knospe bricht;
Sie haben gefunden, was ihnen gebricht:
Und du?

Rastloses Sehnen! Wünschendes Herz,
Immer nur Tränen, Klage und Schmerz?
Auch ich bin mir schwellender Triebe bewußt!
Wer stillet mir endlich die drängende Lust?
Nur du befreist den Lenz in der Brust,
Nur du!

April 19 2010

4897 c9c6

It felt as if one’s entire world was one, long Sunday afternoon.
Nothing to do. Nowhere to go.

Reposted fromSAIGONMARKET SAIGONMARKET

April 05 2010

02mydafsoup-01
All my Easter postings in 2009 & 2010 are to see via tag Easter. 

oanth - muc - 20100405

March 21 2010

02mydafsoup-01
The Picture: Haft Sīn (from Wikipedia, likewise all the following extracts)

Happy Nowruz!

Also spelled Norouz, Norooz, Narooz, Nawruz, Newroz, Newruz, Nauruz, Nawroz, Noruz, Novruz, Nauroz, Navroz, Naw-Rúz, Nowroj, Navroj, Nevruz, Neyruz, Наврӯз, Navruz, Navrez, Nooruz, Nauryz, Nevruz, Nowrouz,

Haft Sīn

Haft Sīn (هفت سین) or the seven 'S's is a major tradition of Nowruz. The haft sin table includes seven specific items starting with the letter 'S' or Sīn (س) in the Persian alphabet. The items symbolically correspond to seven creations and holy immortals protecting them. The Haft Sin has evolved over time, but has kept its symbolism. Traditionally, families attempt to set as beautiful a Haft Sīn table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste.



The Haft Sīn items are:

  • sabzeh - wheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish - symbolizing rebirth
  • samanu - a sweet pudding made from wheat germ - symbolizing affluence
  • senjed - the dried fruit of the oleaster tree - symbolizing love
  • sīr - garlic - symbolizing medicine
  • sīb - apples - symbolizing beauty and health
  • somaq - sumac berries - symbolizing (the color of) sunrise
  • serkeh - vinegar - symbolizing age and patience

Other items on the table may include:

April 13 2009

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April 12 2009

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March 21 2009

02mydafsoup-01
The Picture: Haft Sīn

Happy Nowruz!

Also spelled Norouz, Norooz, Narooz, Nawruz, Newroz, Newruz, Nauruz, Nawroz, Noruz, Novruz, Nauroz, Navroz, Naw-Rúz, Nowroj, Navroj, Nevruz, Neyruz, Наврӯз, Navruz, Navrez, Nooruz, Nauryz, Nevruz, Nowrouz,

Haft Sīn

Haft Sīn (هفت سین) or the seven 'S's is a major tradition of Nowruz. The haft sin table includes seven specific items starting with the letter 'S' or Sīn (س) in the Persian alphabet. The items symbolically correspond to seven creations and holy immortals protecting them. The Haft Sin has evolved over time, but has kept its symbolism. Traditionally, families attempt to set as beautiful a Haft Sīn table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste.



The Haft Sīn items are:

  • sabzeh - wheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish - symbolizing rebirth
  • samanu - a sweet pudding made from wheat germ - symbolizing affluence
  • senjed - the dried fruit of the oleaster tree - symbolizing love
  • sīr - garlic - symbolizing medicine
  • sīb - apples - symbolizing beauty and health
  • somaq - sumac berries - symbolizing (the color of) sunrise
  • serkeh - vinegar - symbolizing age and patience

Other items on the table may include:

1
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