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September 24 2013

Les robots pourraient révolutionner la fabrication électronique chinoise - WSJ.com

Les robots pourraient révolutionner la fabrication électronique chinoise - WSJ.com
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303759604579093122607195610.html

Les travailleurs chinois deviennent trop cher : alors la Chine se robotise. Tags : fing internetactu internetactu2net #robot économie

#économie

July 30 2013

La DARPA révèle un robot humanoïde de secours - Technology Review

La DARPA révèle un #robot humanoïde de secours - Technology Review
http://www.technologyreview.com/news/517136/meet-atlas-the-robot-designed-to-save-the-day

Atlas est un robot humanoïde créé pour l’agence de recherche du département de la Défense américain par Boston Dynamics qui vise à remplacer l’homme dans des situations très dangereuses. Tags : internetactu2net internetactu fing robot #robotique

July 28 2013

2013/07/11 DARPA's ATLAS Robot Unveiled

2013/07/11 DARPA’s #ATLAS #Robot Unveiled
http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Releases/2013/07/11.aspx

L’armée états-unienne développe des robots ou, plus exactement, organise un concours de robot. Mais c’est pour la bonne cause : c’est pour intervenir dans des situations de désastre humanitaire…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkBnFPBV3f0

On Monday, July 8, 2013, the seven teams that progressed from DARPA’s Virtual Robotics Challenge (VRC) arrived at the headquarters of Boston Dynamics in Waltham, Mass. to meet and learn about their new teammate, the ATLAS robot. Like coaches starting with a novice player, the teams now have until late December 2013 to teach ATLAS the moves it will need to succeed in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Trials where each robot will have to perform a series of tasks similar to what might be required in a disaster response scenario.

Sur le même sujet, un petit best of de vidéos sélectionnées par le Huff à la fin de l’article sur Atlas
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/07/12/atlas-robots-pictures_n_3585934.html

July 24 2013

Le graphiste humain bouge encore, par G L et Grégory Maklès

Le #graphiste humain bouge encore, par G L et Grégory Maklès
http://www.pauljorion.com/blog/?p=56583

À part ça, il est remarquable que dans la plupart des cas l’affichage sur écran suffit et que le support papier est finalement réservé à ce qui sera montré à des gens trop importants pour qu’ils s’installent devant un écran.

Le fait de disposer d’un #robot capable de tremper un pinceau dans un pot de peinture et de le déplacer sur la toile n’apportera pratiquement rien de nouveau à mon avis : la quantité de peinture et de toile qu’il faudrait gaspiller pour les multiples essais nécessaires ne se justifiera pas et n’aura qu’un intérêt limité par rapport à un programme capable d’afficher une image équivalente sur un écran.

#artiste
@mad_meg @tanxxx

June 27 2012

Four short links: 27 June 2012

  1. Turing Centenary Speech (Bruce Sterling) -- so many thoughtbombs, this repays rereading. We’re okay with certain people who “think different” to the extent of buying Apple iPads. We’re rather hostile toward people who “think so very differently” that their work will make no sense for thirty years — if ever. We’ll test them, and see if we can find some way to get them to generate wealth for us, but we’re not considerate of them as unusual, troubled entities wandering sideways through a world they never made. ... Cognition exists, and computation exists, but they’re not the same phenomenon with two different masks on. ... Explain to me, as an engineer, why it’s so important to aspire to build systems with “Artificial Intelligence,” and yet you’d scorn to build “Artificial Femininity.” What is that about? ... Every day I face all these unstable heaps of creative machinery. How do we judge art created with, by, and or through these devices? What is our proper role with them? [...] How do we judge what we’re doing? How do we distribute praise and blame, rewards and demerits, how do to guide it, how do we attribute meaning to it? ... oh just read the whole damn piece, it's the best thing you'll read this month.
  2. Handsontable -- Excel-like grid editing plugin for jQuery (MIT-licensed).
  3. Lumoback (Kickstarter) -- smart posture sensor which provides a gentle vibration when you slouch to remind you to sit or stand straight. It is worn on your lower back and designed to be slim, sleek and so comfortable that you barely feel it when you have it on. (via Tim O'Reilly)
  4. Robot Hand Beats You At Rock-Paper-Scissors (IEEE) -- tl;dr: computer vision and fast robotics means it chooses after you reveal, but it happens so quickly that you don't realize it's cheating. (via Hacker News)

October 20 2011

Jason Huggins' Angry Birds-playing Selenium robot

I've used Selenium on several Java projects, so I was just assuming that the topic of Selenium would be germane to JavaOne. I sent the co-creator of Selenium, Jason Huggins (@hugs), a quick email to see if he was interested in talking to us on camera about Selenium and Java, and he responded with a quick warning: He wasn't into Java. "Python and JavaScript (and to a lesser extent, CoffeeScript and Hypertalk) are my true passions when it comes to programming," he wrote. I thought this was fair enough — very few people could call Java "a passion" at this point — and I could do my best to steer the conversation toward Java. Selenium can be scripted in whatever language, and I was convinced that we needed to include some content about testing in our interviews.

He also was wondering if he could talk about something entirely different: "a Selenium-powered, 'Angry Birds'-playing mobile-phone-testing robot." While I had initially been worried I'd have to sit for several hours of interviews about Component Dependency Ennui 4.2, here was an interesting guy that wanted to not only demonstrate his "Angry Birds"-playing robot but also relate it to his testing-focused startup Saucelabs. I welcomed the opportunity, and here's the result:

From what I could gather, Huggins' bot is driving two servo motors that control a retractable "dowel" finger covered in some sort of skin-like material that can fool the capacitive touch sensor of a mobile device. He sends keystroke commands through this Arduino-based controller, which then sends signals to two servo motors. The frame of the device is made of what looks like balsa wood. He's calling it a "BitBeamBot." You can find out all about it here and you can see it in action in the following video:

Relating BitBeamBot to Saucelabs and Selenium

In the course of the interview it became clear that BitBeamBot was the product of an off-time project. Here's how Huggins explained it: Imagine a wall of these retractable dowels, each representing a single pixel. if you could create a system to control these dowels, then you could draw pictures with a controller.

While working on this project, Huggins attended a Maker Faire and found some suitable technology. His creation of a single-arm controller then led to his big "eureka" moment: This same technology could create a robot that can play "Angry Birds," and if a contraption can play "Angry Birds," it's a simple leap to create a system that can test any mobile application in the real world.

Huggins went through a similar discovery process with Selenium. Selenium is a contraption that supports and contains a browser. You feed a series of instructions and criteria to a browser and then you measure the output.

With BitBeamBot, Huggins has taken the central software idea that he developed at Thoughtworks and applied it to the physical world. He envisions a service from Saucelabs, the company he co-founded, where customers would pay to have mobile applications tested in farms of these mobile testing robots.

Saucelabs

Saucelabs is focused on the idea that testing infrastructure is often more expensive to set up and maintain than most companies realize. The burden of maintaining an infrastructure of browsers and machines can often exceed the effort required to support a production network.

With Saucelabs you can move your testing infrastructure to the cloud. The company offers a service that executes testing scripts on cloud-based hardware. For a few dollars you can run a suite of unit tests against an application without having to worry about physical hardware and ongoing maintenance. Saucelabs is trying to do for testing what Amazon EC2 and other services have done for hosting.

Toward the end of the interview (contained in the first video, above) we also discussed some interesting recent developments at Saucelabs, including a new system that uses SSH port forwarding to allow Saucelabs' testing infrastructure to test internal applications behind a corporate firewall.

Strata 2012 — The 2012 Strata Conference, being held Feb. 28-March 1 in Santa Clara, Calif., will offer three full days of hands-on data training and information-rich sessions. Strata brings together the people, tools, and technologies you need to make data work.

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July 09 2010

Jigsaw ep.403 - Videotainment Revolution.

Milton plans a rebellion to reclaim the Jigsaw Video Thing from the clutches of cancelation. While Milton attempts to recruit the Tikis to the cause, Regibor makes a startling revelation. Two, if you count the bit where he reveals that Kranium told them the show was canceled months ago.

July 07 2010

Jigsaw ep.402 - That's My Lump.

Milton is shocked at his discovery that Dr. Kranium has canceled Jigsaw. He tries to enlist Lump for help, only to discover that Lump has other plans.

June 28 2010

Jigsaw ep.401 - The Last One.

It was super tempting to use one of Ivor Slaney's famous tracks of music at the end of this episode, but somehow the silence just seemed more powerful.
What, you don't know Ivor Slaney? You know Ivor Slaney. He's the guy who wrote that song. The one that goes "Dun dun DUUUUUNNNNN!" And the one that goes "Doodle DEE doodle DEE doodle DEETdoodleDEE!!" But he's really best known for the "Dun dun DUUUUUNNNN!" one. He's my musical hero.

June 24 2010

Spiderleggy Jigsaw promo

To be fair, the robotic spider legs shown here are pretty cool. New episode next week, provided no more hard drives decide to fail.
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