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April 30 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Nice day for a revolution: Why May Day should be a date to stand up and change the system http://ind.pn/iqQs4j #mayday

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// a greater excerpt of the article is also available on soup.io - permalink

  
Twitter / David Harvey: Nice day for a revolution: ... | 2011-04-29

March 23 2011

02mydafsoup-01

L'Iran aurait réussi à bloquer Tor provisoirement | Numerama 2011-03-23

La mesure n'aura été efficace que le temps de modifier légèrement le protocole pour mieux se dissimuler dans la masse des données chiffrées. Mais l'Iran aurait réussi à identifier à la volée toutes les communications Tor passant par ses réseaux, pour les bloquer, sans toucher aux autres données sécurisées.

Il ne s'agit pas heureusement d'un déchiffrement du contenu des communications, mais simplement d'une identification des données véhiculées par le protocole Tor. Ce qui est déjà en soit un petit exploit technologique. Selon les informations du Daily Telegraph reprises par Le Point, l'Iran aurait en effet réussi ces dernières semaines à couper les seules communications chiffrées établies avec Tor, sans toucher aux autres communications chiffrées comme celles employées par les systèmes de paiement en ligne.

[...]

Reposted byiranelection iranelection

March 08 2011

02mydafsoup-01
[...]

At the heart of the complaints among the protesters—more than poverty and unemployment and low wages—is the sense that the pervasive corruption of wasta, or connections, must end. People are asking for better governance and accountability. Each Arab nation has its own permutations of a balance of power among tribe, sect, mosque, and military. The most striking and unexpected aspect of the protests is that none of these entities have been at the forefront. Extremism has also been missing. There’s been little talk of jihad, caliphates, or Osama bin Laden. It’s as if Al Qaeda had been suddenly rendered as anachronistic as dictatorial whim and official State Department Middle East policy. It is tempting to see a kind of new pan-Arabism, one that is based not on dictators shaking hands and then whispering plots behind each other’s back but on shared aspirations. Last Wednesday, before the Egyptian Prime Minister, Ahmed Shafik, resigned, he was taken to task by journalists and opposition personalities in a debate televised on an independent satellite channel. He was combative and uncomfortable, but, for the first time that anyone could remember, an Arab leader had to answer difficult questions from fellow-citizens. Faced with a call for a million-man march to demand his ouster, Shafik left office the next day.

[...]
Reform and Revolution in the Middle East : The New Yorker | 2011-03-07

March 05 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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The end of the Cold War, the reunification of Germany, liberalism and Perestroyka. The USSR's first and last president, Mikhail Gorbachev celebrates his 80th birthday today, and his legacy includes being hailed as the father of Russia's democracy. Mikhail Gorbachev was born in a small village in the south of the country, and became leader of the USSR in 1985. With his economic and political reforms, he paved the way for democracy in Russia. His best known reform is dubbed "Perestroyka", which aimed to revamp the country without destroying the basis of socialism. His initiatives also led to the abolishment of state censorship and the creation of free speech in the country. Gorbachev received the Nobel peace prize in 1990. A year later, however, he was removed from power in a coup which saw the collapse of the Soviet Union and Boris Yeltsin become president. But Mikhail Gorbachev still says his reforms were timely and necessary. "We realized from experience that it was dangerous to wait much longer, that we had to take a risk," he told RT in an interview. "But we couldn't postpone it, we needed changes." Gorbachev does not agree when people say that Perestroyka failed: "It didn't fail. It was disrupted, derailed, stopped. But still, Perestroyka achieved a lot. Inside Russia, we had democracy, free elections, freedom of consciousness, private property, freedom to travel abroad --everything. Also, glasnost. There was so much openness -- the entire country was affected. People realized they had finally got some freedom, an opportunity to act." The first USSR president points out that the end of the Cold War was among key goals of his administration: "In foreign affairs, we put an end to the Cold War. We normalized our relationship with the US, we reunited Germany -- we didn't send our tanks or troops there. All our units in Eastern Europe stayed where they were. It wasn't always easy." However, many things did not work as planned, Gorbachev confessed. "At the beginning, when we made our first mistakes, we didn't really explain to people what was going on and didn't get them involved in all those processes -- we were self-confident," he said. "But in public politics, I don't think we ever lost a major battle," Mikhail Gorbachev concluded.

April 19 2010

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