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May 10 2012

O'Reilly Radar Show 5/10/12: The surprising rise of JavaScript

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the May 10, 2012 episode of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel and you can subscribe to episodes of O’Reilly Radar via iTunes.


The Radar interview

JavaScript’s ascendance has caught many people by surprise. Fluent Conference co-chair Peter Cooper explains why and how it happened in this episode of O’Reilly Radar [interview begins 12 seconds in].

Radar posts of note

Here’s a look at some of the top stories recently published across O’Reilly [segment begins at 11:58].

First up, Mike Hendrickson has published his annual five-part analysis of the computer book market. "State of the Computer Book Market" is a must-read for publishers and developers alike. The full report is also available as a free ebook. Read the series.

In a recent interview with Etsy's Mike Brittain we learned that a failure in secondary content doesn't need to take down an entire website. Brittain explains how to build resilience into UIs and allow for graceful failures. Read the post.

Finally, in our piece "Big data in Europe" Big Data Week organizers Stewart Townsend and Carlos Somohano share the distinctions and opportunities of Europe's data scene. Read the post.

As always, links to these stories and other resources mentioned during this episode are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Radar video spotlight

During a recent podcast interview, Velocity Conference chair Steve Souders described himself as an "optimization nut." Find out what that means — and discover how to stay on top of the latest web ops and performance techniques — in this episode’s video spotlight [segment begins at 13:04].

Here are the web operations and performance resources Steve Souders mentions during the video spotlight segment:


Closing

All of the links and resources noted during this episode — including those mentioned by Steve Souders in the previous segment — are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Also, you can always catch episodes of O’Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia and subscribe to episodes through iTunes.

That’s all we have for now. Thanks for joining us and we’ll see you again soon.

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

March 12 2012

O'Reilly Radar Show 3/12/12: Best data interviews from Strata California 2012

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the March 12, 2012 episode of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel and you can subscribe to episodes of O'Reilly Radar via iTunes.



In this special edition of the Radar Show we're bringing you three of our best interviews from the 2012 Strata Conference in California.

First up is Hadoop creator Doug Cutting discussing the similarities between Linux and the big data world. [Interview begins 16 seconds in.]

In our second interview from Strata California, Max Gadney from After the Flood explains the benefits of video data graphics. [Begins at 7:04.]

In our final Strata CA interview, Kaggle's Jeremy Howard looks at the difference between big data and analytics. [Begins at 13:46.]

Closing

Just a reminder that you can always catch episodes of O'Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia and subscribe to episodes through iTunes.

All of the links and resources mentioned during this episode are posted at radar.oreilly.com/show.

That's all we have for this episode. Thanks for joining us and we'll see you again soon.

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

February 10 2012

O'Reilly Radar Show 2/10/12: The 5 trends that will shape the data world

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the February 10, 2012 episode of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel and you can subscribe to episodes of O'Reilly Radar via iTunes.


Introduction

There are five major trends that will shape the data world in the months to come. Strata Conference chair Edd Dumbill reveals them in this episode of O'Reilly Radar. [Starts 12 seconds in.]

Also in this episode: We revisit a conversation with Wired's Kevin Kelly in which he discusses freemium models and why digital rights management will likely persist in some form or another. [Interview begins at 11:04.]

Radar posts of note

[This segment begins at the 10:06 mark.]

For now, legislators have backed off of the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act, but the friction between media companies and online piracy persists. In his piece "SOPA and PIPA are bad industrial policy," Tim O'Reilly explains why these efforts — and those sure to emerge down the road — hold back innovative business models that grow the overall market.

It's the hot trend in software right now, but what does big data mean, and how can you exploit it? In "What is big data?," Strata chair Edd Dumbill presents an introduction and orientation to the big data landscape.

Finally, books, publishing processes and readers have all made the jump to digital, and that's creating considerable opportunities for publishing startups. Justo Hidalgo explores the digital shift in his piece, "Three reasons why we're in a golden age of publishing entrepreneurship."

As always, links to these stories and other resources mentioned during this episode are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Radar video spotlight

At the 2011 Tools of Change for Publishing conference I had a chance to interview Wired's Kevin Kelly about two topics that continue to play big roles in the content world: the freemium model and digital rights management.

As you'll see in the following video, Kelly has a unique, long-view perspective on both of these issues.

[Interview begins at 11:04.]

Closing

Just a reminder that you can always catch episodes of O'Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia and subscribe to episodes through iTunes.

All of the links and resources mentioned during this episode are posted at radar.oreilly.com/show.

That's all we have for this episode. Thanks for joining us and we'll see you again soon.

January 24 2012

O'Reilly Radar 01/24/12: Info overload vs over-consumption

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the January 24, 2011 episode of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel and you can subscribe to episodes of O'Reilly Radar via iTunes.


Do you suffer from information overload?

If so you may be surprised to learn that Clay Johnson, author of "The Information Diet," believes that consumption — not overload — is the source of our information problems. My interview with Johnson is coming up in just a moment.

Also in this episode of O'Reilly Radar:

We take a look at top stories recently published across O'Reilly's platforms.

And O'Reilly's Alex Howard sits down with San Francisco mayor Ed Lee to discuss open data, open government, and bridging the digital divide.


The Radar interview: Clay Johnson

Coming up next in the Radar interview, "Information Diet" author Clay Johnson explains the difference between information overload and information over-consumption.

Radar top stories

Up next we take a look at some of the top stories recently published across O'Reilly's platforms.

Alistair Croll says the information economy is giving way to something new: the feedback economy. Alistair notes that the efficiencies and optimizations that come from constant feedback will soon become the norm for businesses and governments. Read the post.

In his piece, "Epatients: The hackers of the healthcare world," Fred Trotter explains what an epatient is — the "e" stands for "empowered" — and he offers a collection of epatient resources and first steps. Read the post.

Finally, Strata chair Edd Dumbill looks at the five key themes that will define the data world in the months ahead. Edd expects to see developments in streaming data frameworks and data marketplaces, along with a maturation in the roles and processes of data science. Read the post.

Links to these stories and other resources mentioned during this episode are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.


Radar video spotlight

At his recent swearing-in ceremony, new San Francisco major Ed Lee noted:

"We in government should not be afraid of disruption. We should embrace it."

In the following interview, conducted at Web 2.0 Summit last fall, you'll learn how Lee and San Francisco are putting that disruption to use through open data and open government.

Closing

Just a reminder that you can always catch episodes of O'Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia and subscribe to episodes through iTunes.

All of the links and resources mentioned during this episode are posted at radar.oreilly.com/show.

That's all we have for this episode. Thanks for joining us and we'll see you again soon.

December 20 2011

O'Reilly Radar Script & Links: December 20, 2011

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the December 20, 2011 edition of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel. You can find scripts and links for other episodes here.


In this episode of O’Reilly Radar, find out why Joe Wikert thinks Amazon’s Kindle Lending Library is a bad deal for publishers.

We’ll also take a look at top stories published recently across O’Reilly’s platforms.

And LinkedIn’s Reid Hoffman discusses technology’s role in job creation.

Now we’ll get to all that in just a moment, but up first we’re going to take a look at some of the news that’s on our radar.


Radar news & analysis

Many of us rely on mapping services like Google Maps to get from point A to point B. But the utility of these tools abruptly cuts off when we reach the front doors of our destinations.

Indoor navigation has, until recently, been defined by posted signs and the kindness of strangers.

But what if you could pull out your mobile device and easily navigate unfamiliar indoor locations?

Meridian, Nokia and other companies have been working to make indoor navigation useful. Now, Google is jumping into the indoor fray as well.

A new release of Google Maps for Android includes floor plans for a number of airports, malls and retailers in the U.S. and Japan.

Google’s indoor maps can guide you from spot to spot, and they even know which floor you're on.

For now, Google's indoor navigation is available in a limited roll-out. The feature is only compatible with Android devices and the list of participating outlets is pretty slim.

Nonetheless, this is one of those “we’ve always needed this” sorts of tools. So watch for indoor nav from the likes of Google and others to quickly transition from novelty to an established -- and expected -- part of future mapping apps.

We’ll be keeping an eye on the evolution of these geo tools and nav applications through continuing coverage on O’Reilly Radar, and at O’Reilly’s upcoming Where Conference.

The Radar interview: Joe Wikert

Coming up next I find out why O’Reilly’s Joe Wikert thinks Amazon’s Kindle Lending Library is a bad deal for publishers. Joe also weighs in on Amazon Prime, and he reveals some of the trends he’s spotting as he preps for February’s Tools of Change for Publishing conference.


Radar posts of note

Here’s a look at some of the top stories recently published across O’Reilly’s platforms.

Clay Johnson, author of the forthcoming book “The Information Diet,” has a problem with the term “information overload.” Johnson believes that information consumption is what really needs to be addressed. Read the post.

In a short and informative case study, discover how Omnivore Books, a small cookbook store in San Francisco, uses Twitter to solidify relationships with customers and break through the publisher blockade. The store has distilled its Twitter process into a dead simple rule: be ⅓ personal and ⅔ professional. Read the post.

Finally, what happens when everyone has access to your Starbucks card? Author Jonathan Stark found out this past summer when he conducted a unique social experiment. He shares what he learned in this interview. Read the post.

You can find links to these posts and other resources mentioned during this episode at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Radar video spotlight

In this episode’s Video Spotlight, we’re featuring Alex Howard’s recent interview with LinedIn founder Reid Hoffman.

Hoffman explains how technology, often perceived as a threat to jobs, can actually help create them.


Just a reminder that you can always catch episodes of O’Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia. And links mentioned in each episode are posted at radar.oreilly.com/show.

That’s all we have for this episode. Thanks for joining us and we’ll see you again soon.

November 30 2011

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