Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

February 09 2012

O'Reilly ebooks now optimized for Kindle Fire

Earlier this week, we at O'Reilly regenerated all of our ebook-bundle Mobi files, upgrading them to meet the specifications for Amazon's latest ebook format, KF8.

These files are now available for download in your account on oreilly.com. If your ebook bundle includes a Mobi file (and more than 90% of bundles do), you can download the updated, KF8-compliant file now. (Note: All O'Reilly Media files are now available in KF8. Partner publishers will come soon.)

As always, our ebook bundles are DRM-free. See this page for instructions on loading O'Reilly Mobi files to your Kindle.

We've optimized our Mobi files for Kindle Fire by taking advantage of KF8's support of @media queries. While @media queries have been commonplace on the web for some time, they are just now making their way to ebook ecosystems. KF8's support of @media queries allows you to create an ebook that looks and potentially behaves differently based on your reading device.

For an example of @media queries in action, see the image below, which shows how the same Mobi file appears on a traditional Kindle (left) versus the new Kindle Fire (right):

Comparison of a Mobi file on a traditional Kindle and the Kindle fire
Click to enlarge.

Amazon's support for @media queries makes this possible, and O'Reilly is among the first publishers to employ this feature across all of its Kindle content. Here are some of the new features that you can expect to see on your Kindle Fire (enhancements vary by book):

  • Color images
  • Syntax-highlighted code
  • Improved layout and design with CSS3
  • Embedded code font for better legibility and glyph support

Here are some screenshots from our newly optimized Mobis:

Optimized Mobi file from Make Electronics
Click to enlarge.

Optimized Mobi file from JavaScript: The Definitive Guide
Click to enlarge.

Starting this week, our books will begin to be available in KF8 format through Amazon's Kindle Store. However, an unfortunate limitation of buying from Amazon is that they don't normally provide customers with publisher updates. By contrast, buying direct from O'Reilly gives you access to lifetime, DRM-free updates in all standard ebook formats.

Related:

October 26 2011

We're in the midst of a restructuring of the publishing universe (don't panic)

A new book released this week called "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto," by Hugh McGuire (@hughmcguire) and Brian O'Leary (@brianoleary), examines the future of book publishing from an advanced perspective. Beyond pricing and delivery mechanisms, beyond taking print and displaying it on a screen, the authors look at the digital transformation as more than a change in format — as stated in the book's introduction:

The move to digital is not just a format shift, but a fundamental restructuring of the universe of publishing. This restructuring will touch every part of a publishing enterprise — or at least most publishing enterprises. Shifting to digital formats is 'part one' of this changing universe; 'part two' is what happens once everything is digital. This is the big, exciting unknown.

I reached out to the book's co-author Hugh McGuire to examine some of the elements at play in the future of publishing and in the "exciting unknown" of doing things with books that have never before been possible. Our interview follows.

What's the story behind "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto"?

HughMcGuire.jpgHugh McGuire: I'd been working on building PressBooks.com — a digital book production tool designed for publishers — and I wanted to get a real sense of how it worked, hands on. How better than to manage a real publishing project, working with a real publisher, from beginning to end, using PressBooks?

Of course, it made sense to make it a book about the future of books and publishing. So much ink is spilled about that topic, but we wanted to get away from the abstract and right down to the nitty-gritty. We wanted to produce something that would be a handbook you could give to someone starting a publishing house today.

I talked to my friend Brian O'Leary about co-editing with me, and he was on board. With that, I pitched it to Joe Wikert at O'Reilly — he loved the idea, and off we went.

It's been a bit of a challenge, producing a book while simultaneously building the book production tool on which the book is produced, but we've managed ... if a month or two late.

This is a broad question, but what are the major ways digital is changing publishing?

Hugh McGuire: It's more like in what ways isn't digital changing publishing? First, we very quickly dispatched of the pre-Kindle, pre-iPad question of, "Will people read books on screens?" Yes, and the growth curves are spectacular. The publishing world has, in a pretty orderly way, adapted to this change — with digital files now slotting alongside print books in the distribution chain. I think is this just the start, however.

The publishing world has managed the "digital-conversion disruption" pretty well. Publishers make ebooks now as a matter of course, and consumers buy them and read them on a multitude of devices.

What we as an industry haven't managed yet is the "digital-native disruption." What happens when all new books are ebooks, and the majority of books are read on digital devices, most of which are connected to the Internet? This brings with it so many new expectations from consumers, and I think this is where the real disruption in the market will come.

The kinds of disruption there include: speed of the publishing process, reader engagement with content, linking in and out of books, layers of context added to books, and the webification of books. I think the transitions we've seen in the past three years will pale in comparison to what's going to happen to publishing in the next three years.

Book: A Futurist's Manifesto — Through this collection of essays from publishing thought leaders and practitioners, you'll become familiar with a wide range of developments occurring in the wake of the digital book shakeup.

Which digital tools should publishers focus on?

Hugh McGuire: Publishing is such a strange, conservative business, and I think there is a real hesitancy to invest heavily early on until there is real clarity on what the long-term standards will be. But EPUB is based on HTML, and I think whatever happens, HTML will be with us for the long haul.

So, tools I think publishers need to start working with:

These are the keys to having a successful publishing company that is future-proofed as best as it can be.

Why is metadata important to digital publishing?

Hugh McGuire: Physical bookstores provide a range of crucial services beyond being a place where you can buy books. Stores offer selection, curation, and recommendation. The digital book retail world is very different because it offers nearly unlimited selection. While retailers like Amazon spend a fair bit of energy trying to recommend titles to readers, the task of sifting through and finding books is increasingly left to consumers.

So, having good metadata — which really should be renamed "information about a book" so it's less intimidating — means providing information that will: A) ensure that people looking for your book, or for the kind of content in your book, will find it; and B) help potential buyers of your book decide they want to buy it.

On the web, companies spend lots of time making sure their sites are search engine optimized, so that people looking for those websites (or the information on them) will find them. Attaching good metadata to a book is much like search engine optimization — it's the mechanism you use to make sure your book gets found by the people looking for it.

What will the publishing landscape look like in five years?

Hugh McGuire: In five years:

  • Print is a marginal part of the trade business.
  • There's a huge increase in the number of small publishers of all stripes.
  • There's a massive increase in the number of books on the market.
  • The Big Six publishers will consolidate to become the Big Two or Three.
  • Most writers will continue to have a hard time making a living as writers.
  • Good/successful publishers will be those that provide good APIs to their books.
  • All books will be expected to be connected to the web, allowing linking in and out, and contextual layers of commentary, etc. (Will this be driven by publishers or retailers? To date, retailers have lead the way.)
  • The distinction between what you can do with an ebook and what you can do with a website will disappear (and it will seem strange that it ever existed).
  • While books will become more webby, the web will also become more bookish, accommodating more book-like structures in evolving HTML standards.

What's the publishing schedule for "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto"?

Hugh McGuire: The book comes in three parts:

  1. Out now: "Part 1: The Setup" — This addresses what's happening right now in publishing.
  2. Out sometime before Christmas: "Part 2: The Outlook: What Is Next for the Book?" — Given the technology we currently have, what can we expect to see happening with books going forward?
  3. Out in early 2012: "Part 3: The Things We Can Do with Books: Projects from the Bleeding Edge" — Case studies of real publishing projects, technologies, and enterprises working right now at the bleeding edge.

This interview was edited and condensed.

Related:

July 08 2011

Publishing News: Fantasy author is out for blood

Here are a few highlights from this week's publishing news. (Note: Some of these stories were previously published on Radar.)

George RR Martin wants a "head on a spike"

RRMartinBookCover.pngAn unfortunate Amazon employee in Germany might want to get a body guard. The fifth book in George RR Martin's "Song of Fire and Ice" series, "A Dance With Dragons," was embargoed until July 12, but about 180 copies were accidentally released by Amazon Germany. Martin responded to the situation with an impressive level of rage, writing in his blog:

Yes, I know, Amazon Germany screwed up big time and started shipping A DANCE WITH DRAGONS before they were supposed to. I am told that about 180 copies got out before they were made aware of their mistake and shut down shipping ... I am not happy about this. My publishers are furious ... If we find out who is responsible, we will mount his head on a spike.

Really? A head on a spike? Perhaps that angry energy could be channeled into something more productive — use the error to launch a guerrilla marketing campaign and make it work for you, for instance. Then you could spare the spike for the poor person who screwed up — and maybe sell more books.

TOC Frankfurt 2011 — Being held on Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011, TOC Frankfurt will feature a full day of cutting-edge keynotes and panel discussions by key figures in the worlds of publishing and technology.

Save 100€ off the regular admission price with code TOC2011OR

Amazon moves to expand its increasingly dominant position in publishing

In more Amazon news this week, the retail giant announced its purchase of The Book Depository, an independent online bookseller in the U.K. In the press release, Amazon's VP of European Retail Greg Greeley said:

Customers in more than 100 countries enjoy The Book Depository's vast selection, convenient delivery and free shipping. The Book Depository is very focused on serving its customers around the world, and we look forward to welcoming them to the Amazon family.

Not everything is sunshine and rainbows, however. In a post for The Bookseller, Lisa Campbell reported that the Booksellers Association (BA) is formally opposing the sale and that the Publisher's Association (PA) is expected to follow suit. The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) is investigating as well. The BA's CEO Tim Godfray said in the post:

Amazon's current position could be perceived by booksellers already as that of a de facto monopoly that doesn't take into account this new proposed development and its recent positioning as an e-book publisher. It is good news that this matter is being referred to the OFT.

The matter is expected to be decided by the end of August.

Layering text over images would make reading flow less of a drag

This is part of an ongoing series related to Peter Meyers' project "Breaking the Page, Saving the Reader: A Buyer & Builder's Guide to Digital Books." We'll be featuring additional material in the weeks ahead. (Note: This post originally appeared on A New Kind of Book. It's republished with permission.)


Don't you find it annoying when you have to flip back and forth between a page of text and a picture it describes a few pages away? Consider, for example, this passage from an art history book on how Michelangelo combined doodles, text, and drawings:

At the top [of the illustration, a few pages away] ... is the horizontal sketch of a leg universally credited to Michelangelo and apparently belonging to a woman or a boy. At the left of the open top of the leg, the artist has written Am and fig, the latter actually appearing inside the outline of the upper part of the limb.

The text is on page 37 (of "Michelangelo: A Life on Paper"); the figure that the author, Leonard Barkan, refers to, meanwhile, is over on page 39, looking like so:

Michelangelo drawing in art history book with brief, uninformative caption
Michelangelo drawing in art history book with brief, uninformative caption. Click to enlarge

So you traipse back and forth between explanation and image, first trying to identify the items in question, and then trying to register why those things are worthy of commentary.

What a pain. What a drag on the reading flow you've established, thanks to Professor Barkan's otherwise incisive writing. What a pain for him, having to describe in text what would be trivially easy to point to were he standing next to you and the illustration. And how ironic, finally, that in a book devoted to the interplay between words and image so much of the author's commentary is segregated in body copy away from the actual figures. How much more useful and easy-to-follow would his comments be if they were bolted onto the figure, like so:

  • This story continues here.



Related:


  • How one publisher uses "aggressive marketing"
  • Getting your book in front of 160 million users is usually a good thing
  • More Publishing Week in Review coverage



  • July 07 2011

    Images and text need to get together

    This is part of an ongoing series related to Peter Meyers' project "Breaking the Page, Saving the Reader: A Buyer & Builder's Guide to Digital Books." We'll be featuring additional material in the weeks ahead. (Note: This post originally appeared on A New Kind of Book. It's republished with permission.)



    Don't you find it annoying when you have to flip back and forth between a page of text and a picture it describes a few pages away? Consider, for example, this passage from an art history book on how Michelangelo combined doodles, text, and drawings:

    At the top [of the illustration, a few pages away] ... is the horizontal sketch of a leg universally credited to Michelangelo and apparently belonging to a woman or a boy. At the left of the open top of the leg, the artist has written Am and fig, the latter actually appearing inside the outline of the upper part of the limb.

    The text is on page 37 (of "Michelangelo: A Life on Paper"); the figure that the author, Leonard Barkan, refers to, meanwhile, is over on page 39, looking like so:

    Michelangelo drawing in art history book with brief, uninformative caption
    Michelangelo drawing in art history book with brief, uninformative caption. Click to enlarge

    So you traipse back and forth between explanation and image, first trying to identify the items in question, and then trying to register why those things are worthy of commentary.

    What a pain. What a drag on the reading flow you've established, thanks to Professor Barkan's otherwise incisive writing. What a pain for him, having to describe in text what would be trivially easy to point to were he standing next to you and the illustration. And how ironic, finally, that in a book devoted to the interplay between words and image so much of the author's commentary is segregated in body copy away from the actual figures. How much more useful and easy-to-follow would his comments be if they were bolted onto the figure, like so:

    Same image as above, with body text added in margins next to image
    Same image as above, with body text added in margins next to image. Click to enlarge

    You want my guess as to why things weren't done this way? Two reasons: Professor Barkan uses Word rather than a page layout program like InDesign (no shame in that — those programs are awfully tough to learn). And the workflow in place at the publisher, Princeton University Press, doesn't easily let authors mark up figures with custom placed captions. The end result: a diminished reading experience.

    Tools don't equal talent, goes the saying. Too bad the tools most of us use don't capture the simple things most of us would say if we were talking to each other.

    TOC Frankfurt 2011 — Being held on Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011, TOC Frankfurt will feature a full day of cutting-edge keynotes and panel discussions by key figures in the worlds of publishing and technology.

    Save 100€ off the regular admission price with code TOC2011OR



    Related:


    Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
    Could not load more posts
    Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
    Just a second, loading more posts...
    You've reached the end.

    Don't be the product, buy the product!

    Schweinderl