Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

November 11 2011

Top Stories: November 7-11, 2011

Here's a look at the top stories published across O'Reilly sites this week.

Thoughts on ebooks
Tim O'Reilly: "Our original ebook vision was of a world in which ebooks would be published in standard formats and could be read on any device, and where dominance of a particular piece of software or a particular e-reading device would not lock people in."


Confessions of a not-so-public speaker
Stepping out of our comfort zones and into the spotlight at events (and encouraging others to do likewise) can help address the perception that the tech community is solely populated by young white guys.

Social network analysis isn't just for social networks
The scientific methodology of social network analysis (SNA) helps explain not just how people connect, but why they come together as well. Here, "Social Network Analysis for Startups" co-author Maksim Tsvetovat offers a primer on SNA.

Access or ownership: Which will be the default?
Business, media, publishing, data, education — these are all areas where access versus ownership has organically popped up in Radar's coverage. But which model will win out in the long term?

Three game characteristics that can be applied to education
Cloud technologies and thoughtful roadmapping of digital technology can ensure that authenticity, social interaction, and play remain central components of education.


Tools of Change for Publishing, being held February 13-15 in New York, is where the publishing and tech industries converge. Register to attend TOC 2012.

November 10 2011

Access or ownership: Which will be the default?

Open QuestionIn a recent article, The Atlantic takes a looks at the threads that connect Steve Case's investments:

A luxury-home network. A car-sharing company. An explosive deal site. Maybe you see three random ideas. [Steve] Case and his team saw three bets that paid off thanks to a new Web economy that promotes power in numbers and access over ownership. [Emphasis added.]

From time to time at Radar we've been checking in on this "access vs. ownership" trend.

For example, Lisa Gansky, author of "The Mesh," explained why businesses need to embrace sharing and open systems

Corey Pressman, founder of Exprima Media, discussed the role customization will play in an access-dominant media world:

... music access versus ownership is very compelling. I could see a possible near future in which "accessible music" (streaming unlimited cloud access) trumps "owned music" (purchased CDs or downloads). In this scenario, customization — creating customized playlists — is external to the media; customization is handled by the conduit, not the content.

More from Pressman here.

In "What if a book is just a URL?", Radar contributor Jenn Webb pointed out ebook companies that ignore downloads and instead provide access to material.

And in an interview with Audrey Watters, education theorist George Siemens noted that in the education data/analytics world, "Data access and ownership are equally important issues: who should be able to see the analysis that schools perform on learners?"

Business, media, publishing, data, education — these are all areas where access vs. ownership has organically popped up in our coverage. And it's easy to see how the same trend applies to the technical side: access requires storage and ubiquity, which generally leads to a cloud solution (and then you get into issues like public cloud vs private cloud, who's responsible for uptime, what happens when there's a breach, who actually owns that data, how do you maximize performance, and on and on ...)

What's your take? Will access become the default? Or is ownership a hardwired trait?

Please weigh in through the comments or join the conversation at Google+.

Strata 2012 — The 2012 Strata Conference, being held Feb. 28-March 1 in Santa Clara, Calif., will offer three full days of hands-on data training and information-rich sessions. Strata brings together the people, tools, and technologies you need to make data work.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

Related:

October 11 2011

When content customization is baked in, ownership trumps access

The upcoming Books in Browsers conference will focus on books as "networked, distributed sets of interactions," as opposed to content containers. I've asked several of the event's participants to address the larger concepts surrounding books in browsers. We'll be publishing these interviews over the coming weeks.

In the short interview below, Corey Pressman, founder of Exprima Media, tackles a question on ownership versus access. He says that though access is becoming more and more compelling, ownership is still more important for content that can be personalized and customized, such as for book annotations and marginalia.

What are the issues with ownership versus access that need to be overcome on the consumer side, and how can publishers and browser developers best address these issues?

coreypressmanmug.jpgCorey Pressman: Ownership is very important for experiences or content consumption on platforms that can be personalized and customized. This is especially true if the customization gets baked into the content.

For example, music access versus ownership is very compelling. I could see a possible near future in which "accessible music" (streaming unlimited cloud access) trumps "owned music" (purchased CDs or downloads). In this scenario, customization — creating customized playlists — is external to the media; customization is handled by the conduit, not the content.

This is also true of many types of reading; it certainly is when it comes to news. I am very curious to see how the new Kindle/OverDrive plan to allow library lending via the Kindle and Kindle app plays out. In many reading use cases, free two-week access to ebooks seems quite compelling. This is especially true for existing ebook converts already untethered from the symbolic "social display" function of a book collection.

There is a reading behavior for which ownership is important: annotation. The personalized customization of a text with marginalia requires, ideally, some level of ownership in both paper and electronic contexts. Annotating a borrowed paper text is anathema and moot; annotating a borrowed ebook will probably be impossible and moot.

I suppose there could be some scenario in which one borrows and annotates an etext and somehow keeps the annotations, which will realign with the etext when it is accessed again. Perhaps this is a use case that ereading designers and publishers can work on. Business models will dictate the provider-side benefits of ownership versus access. With the help of user experience experts, providers can help preserve essential reading behaviors as they experiment with content delivery models.

This interview was edited and condensed.

Related:

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl