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December 26 2012

Big, open and more networked than ever: 10 trends from 2012

In 2012, technology-accelerated change around the world was driven by the wave of social media, data and mobile devices. In this year in review, we look back at some of the stories that mattered here at Radar and look ahead to what’s in store for 2013.

Below, you’ll find 10 trends that held my interest in 2012. This is by no means a comprehensive account of “everything that mattered in the past year” — try The Economist’s account of the world in 2012 or The Atlantic’s 2012 in review or Popular Science’s “year in ideas” if you’re hungry for that perspective — but I hope you’ll find something new to think about as 2013 draws near.

Social media

Social media wasn’t new in 2012, but it was bigger and more mainstream than ever. There were some firsts, from the first Presidential “Ask Me Anything” on Reddit to the first White House Google Hangout on Google Plus to presidential #debates to the first billion-user social network. The election season had an unprecedented social and digital component, from those hyperwired debates to a presidential campaign built like a startup. Expect even more blogging, tweeting, tumbling, streaming, Liking and pinning in 2013, even if it leaves us searching for context.

Open source in government

Open source software made more inroads in the federal government, from a notable policy at the Consumer Financial Protection Agency to more acceptance in the military.

The White House made its first commits on GitHub, including code for its mobile apps and e-petition platform, where President Obama responded personally to an e-petition for the first time.. The House Oversight Committee’s crowdsourced legislative platform  also went on GitHub. At year’s end, the United States (code) was on GitHub.

Responsive design

According to deputy technical lead Jeremy Vanderlan, the new AIDS.gov, launched in June, was the first full-site implementation of responsive web design for a federal government domain. They weren’t the first to automatically adapt how a website is displayed for the device a visitor is using — you can see next-generation web design at open.nasa.gov or in the way that fcc.gov/live optimizes to provide video to different mobile devices — but this was a genuine milestone for the feds online. By year’s end, Congress had also become responsive, at least with respect to its website, with a new beta at Congress.gov.

Free speech online

Is there free speech on the Internet? As Rebecca MacKinnon, Ethan Zuckerman and others have been explaining for years, what we think of as the new “public square online” is complicated by the fact that these platforms for free expression are owned and operated by private companies. MacKinnon explored these issues, “Consent of the Networked,” one of best technology policy books of the year. In 2012, “Twitter censorship” and the Terms of Service for social networking services caused many more people to suggest a digital Bill of Rights, although “Internet freedom” is an idea that varies with the beholder.

Open mapping

On January 9th, I wondered whether 2012 would be “the year of the open map.” I started reporting on digital maps made with powerful new software and open data last winter. The prediction was partially born out, from Foursquare’s adoption to StreetEast moving from Google Maps to new investments in OpenStreetMap. In response to the shift, Google slashed its price for using the Google Maps API by 88%. In an ideal world, the new competition will result in both better maps and more informed citizens.

Data journalism

Data journalism took on new importance for society. We tracked its growing influence, from the Knight News Challenge to new research initiatives to Africa, and are continuing to investigate data journalism with a series of interviews and a forthcoming report.

Privacy and security

Privacy and security continued to dominate technology policy discussions in the United States, although copyright, spectrum, patents and Internet governance had significant prominence. While the Supreme Court decided GPS monitoring constitutes search under the 4th Amendment, expanded rules for data sharing in the U.S. government raised troubling questions.

In another year that will end without updated baseline privacy legislation from Congress, bills did advance in the U.S. Senate to reform electronic privacy and address location-based technology. After calling for such legislation, the Federal Trade Commission opened an investigation into data brokers.

No “cyber security” bill passed the Senate either, leaving hope that future legislation will balance protections with civil liberties and privacy concerns.

Networked politics

Politics were more wired in Election 2012 than they’d ever been in history, from social media and debates to the growing clout of the Internet. The year started off with the unprecedented wave of networked activism that stopped the progress of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and PROTECT-IP Act (PIPA) in Congress.

At year’s end, the jury remains out on whether the Internet will act as a platform for collective action to address societal challenges, from addressing gun violence in the U.S. to a changing climate.

Open data

As open data moves from the information age to the action age, there are significant advances around the globe. As more data becomes available, its practical application has only increased in importance.

After success releasing health care data to fuel innovation and startups, US CTO Todd Park sought to scale open data and agile thinking across the federal government.

While it’s important to be aware of the ambiguity of open government and open data, governments are continuing to move forward globally, with the United Kingdom relaunching Data.gov.uk and, at year’s end, India and the European Commission launching open data platforms. Cities around the world also adopted open data, from Buenos Aires to Berlin to Palo Alto.

In the United States, friendly competition to be the nation’s preeminent digital city emerged between San Francisco, Chicago, Philadelphia and New York. Open data releases became a point of pride. Landmark legislation in New York City and Chicago’s executive order on open data made both cities national leaders.

As the year ends, we’re working to make dollars and sense of the open data economy, explicitly making a connection between releases and economic growth. Look for a report on our research in 2013.

Open government

The world’s largest democracy officially launching an open government data platform was historic. That said, it’s worth reiterating a point I’ve made before: Simply opening up data is not a replacement for a Constitution that enforces a rule of law, free and fair elections, an effective judiciary, decent schools, basic regulatory bodies or civil society — particularly if the data does not relate to meaningful aspects of society. Adopting open data and digital government reforms is not quite the same thing as good government. Beware openwashing in government, as well as in other areas.

On that count, at year’s end, The Economist found that global open government efforts are growing in “scope and clout.” The Open Government Partnership grew, with new leadership, added experts and a finalized review mechanism. The year to come will be a test of the international partnership’s political will.

In the United States, an open government reality check at the federal level showed genuine accomplishments, but it leaves many promises only partially fulfilled, with a mixed record on meeting goals that many critics found transparently disappointing. While some of the administration’s transparency failures concern national security — notably, the use of drones overseas — science journalists reported restricted access to administration officials at the Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Drug Administration and Department of Health and Human Services.

Efforts to check transparency promises also found compliance with the Freedom of Information Act lacking. While a new FOIA portal is promising, only six federal agencies were on it by year’s end. The administration record on prosecuting whistleblowers has also sent a warning to others considering coming forward regarding waste or abuse in the national security.

Despite those challenges, 2012 was a year of continuing progress for open government at the federal level in the United States, with reasons for hope throughout states and cities. Here’s hoping 2013 sees more advances than setbacks in this area.

Coming tomorrow: 14 trends to watch in 2013.

Reposted bycheg00 cheg00

December 22 2012

14 big trends to watch in 2013

2012 was a remarkable year for technology, government and society. In our 2012 year in review, we looked back at 10 trends that mattered. Below, we look ahead to the big ideas and technologies that will change the world, again.

Liquid data

In 2012, people still kept publishing data in PDFs or trapping it in paper. In 2013, as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists look to use government data as a platform, civic startups that digitize documents will help make data not just open but liquid, flowing across sectors previously stuck in silos.

Networked accountability

In 2012, mobile technology, social media and the Internet have given first responders and government officials new ways to improve situational awareness during natural disasters, like Hurricane Sandy. A growing number of free or low-cost online tools empowers people to do more than just donate money or blood: now, they can donate, time, expertise or, increasingly, act as sensors. In 2013, expect mobile sensors, “sensor journalism” and efforts like Safecast to add to that skein of networked accountability.

Data as infrastructure

When natural disasters loomed in 2012, public open government data feeds became critical infrastructure. In 2013, more of the public sector will see open data as a strategic national resource that merits stewardship and investment.

Social coding

The same peer networks that helped build the Internet are forming around building digital civic infrastructure, from collaboration between newsrooms to open government hackers working together around the country. 2012 was a breakout year for GitHub’s use in government and media. 2013 will be even bigger.

Data commons

Next year, more people will take a risk to tap into the rewards of a health data commons. Open science will be part of the reward equation. (Don’t expect revolutionary change here, just evolutionary change.)

Lean government

The idea of “lean government” gained some traction in 2012, as cities and agencies experimented with applying the lean startup approach to the public sector. With GOV.UK, the British government both redefined the online government platform and showed how citizen-centric design can be done right. In 2013, the worth of a lean government approach will be put to the test when the work of the White House Innovation Fellows is released.

Smart government

Gartner analyst Andrea DiMaio is now looking at the intersection of government and technology through the lens of “smart government.” In 2013, I expect to hear much more about that, from smartphones to smarter cities to smart disclosure.

Sharing economy

Whether it’s co-working, bike sharing, exchanging books and videos, or cohabiting hackerspaces and community garden spaces, there are green shoots throughout the economy that suggest the way we work, play and learn is changing due to the impact of connection technologies and the Great Recession. One of the most dynamic sectors of the sharing economy is the trend toward more collaborative consumption — and the entrepreneurs have followed, from Airbnb to Getable to Freecycle. The private sector and public sector are saving real money through collaborative consumption. Given support from across the ideological spectrum, expect more adoption in 2013.

Preemptive health care

Data science and new health IT offer an extraordinary opportunity to revolutionize health care, a combination that gave Dr. Atul Gawande hope for health care when we spoke in 2012. In 2013, watch for a shift toward “preemptive health care,” as behavioral science becomes part of how affordable care organizations try to keep patients healthy.

Predictive data analytics

Just as doctors hope to detect disease earlier, professionals across industry and the public sector will look to make sense of the data deluge using new tools next year. Predictive data analytics saved lives and taxpayer dollars in New York City in 2012. U.S. cities have now formed a working group to share predictive data analytics skills. Look for data science to be applied to regulatory data more in 2013.

Algorithmic censorship and algorithmic transparency

Expect speech online to continue be a flashpoint next year. As algorithmic censorship becomes a common approach to moderation on social networks and predictive analytics are applied in law enforcement, media, commerce and regulation, there will be even more interest in understanding bias in these systems and the civil rights implications of big data.

Personal data ownership

Should the Freedom of Information Act apply to private companies? In 2012, a report from the World Economic Forum and McKinsey Consulting described personal data as a new asset class. Much of the time, however, people are separated from their personal data. In 2013, expect to see more data disclosed to consumers and citizens and applied in new choice engines.

Open journalism

In 2012, Guardian Editor Alan Rusbridger shared 10 principles for open journalism. While the process of gathering and sharing news in a hyper-networked environment will only grow more messy as more people gain access to tools to publish around the world, this trend isn’t going backward. Despite the trend toward the “broadcast-ification of social media,” there are many more of us listening and sharing now than ever before. Expect journalism to be a more participatory experience in 2013.

Automation, artificial intelligence and employment

The combination of big data, automation and artificial intelligence looked like something new in 2012, from self-driving cars to e-discovery software to “robojournalism” to financial advisers to medical diagnostics. Wherever it’s possible, “software is eating the world.” In 2013, the federal government will need an innovation agenda to win the race against the machines.

September 28 2012

Four key trends changing digital journalism and society

See something or say something: Los AngelesSee something or say something: Los AngelesIt’s not just a focus on data that connects the most recent class of Knight News Challenge winners. They all are part of a distributed civic media community that works on open source code, collects and improves data, and collaborates across media organizations.

These projects are “part of an infrastructure that helps journalists better understand and serve their communities through data,” commented Chris Sopher, Knight Foundation Journalism Program Associate, in an interview last week. To apply a coding metaphor, the Knight Foundation is funding the creation of patches for the source code of society. This isn’t a new focus: in 2011, Knight chose to help build the newsroom stack, from editorial search engines to data cleaning tools.

Following are four themes that jumped out when I looked across the winners of the latest Knight News Challenge round.

Networked accountability

An intercontinental project that bridged citizen science, open data, open source hardware, civic hacking and the Internet of things to monitor, share and map radiation data? Safecast is in its own category. Adapting the system to focus on air quality in Los Angeles — a city that’s known for its smog — will be an excellent stress test for seeing if this distributed approach to networked accountability can scale.

If it does — and hacked Chumbys, LED signs, Twitter bots, smartphone apps and local media reports start featuring the results — open data is going to be baked into how residents of Los Angeles understand their own atmosphere. If this project delivers on some of its promise, the value of this approach will be clearer.

If this project delivers on all of its potential, the air itself might improve. For that to happen, the people who are looking at the realities of air pollution will need to advocate for policy makers to improve it. In the future, the success or failure of this project will inform similar efforts that seek to enlist communities in data collection, including whether governments embrace “citizensourcing” beyond natural disasters and crises. The idea of citizens as sensors continues to have legs.

Peer-to-peer collaboration, across newsrooms

As long as I’ve been reading newspapers, watching television news and following the industry, competition has always been part of the dynamic: be first to the scene, first to get the scoop, first to call the election. As the Internet has taken on a larger role in delivering the news, there have been new opportunities for competition in digital journalism: first to tweet, post or upload video, often followed by rewards from online traffic.

One (welcome) reality that jumps out in this series of Knight grants is that there are journalists from newsrooms that compete for stories who are collaborating on these projects independently. New York Times and Washington Post developers are teaming up to create an open election database. Data journalists from WNYC, the Chicago Tribune and the Spokesman-Review are collaborating on building a better interface for Census data. The same peer networks that helped build the Internet are forming around building out civic infrastructure. It’s an inspiring trend to watch.

The value of an open geo commons

The amount of consternation regarding Apple’s new mapping app for iOS 6 doesn’t seem to be dying down. It shouldn’t: David Pogue called the Apple Map app “an appalling first release,” and maybe “the most embarrassing, least usable piece of software Apple has ever unleashed.” It’s going to take a while for Apple Maps to improve — maybe even years, based upon how long it took for Google to improve maps. In the meantime, iPhone users can go to maps.google.com on Safari, along with the other third-party alternatives that Apple CEO Tim Cook recommended in his letter of apology.

In the wake of “#MAppleGate,” there’s suddenly a lot more attention being paid to the importance and value of mapping data, including how difficult it is to do maps right. And that’s where OpenStreetMap comes in. That’s also why the Knight Foundation is putting more than $500,000 behind tools from Development Seed: it will help to sustain and improve an open geo data commons that media organizations large and small can tap into to inform communities using maps.

“There are two ways the geo data space is going to evolve: 1) in closed silos of proprietary owned data or 2) in the open,” said Eric Gundersen, co-founder and CEO of Development Seed in a recent interview. “Our community does not need a fleet of cars driving millions of miles. We need good infrastructure to make it easy for people to map their surroundings and good community tools to help us garden the data and improve quality. As geo data becomes core to mobile, maps are a canvas to visualizing the ‘where’.”

As with Wikipedia, there will be people who doubt whether an open source digital map revolution enabled by MapBox, Development Seed’s open source mapping suite will come to pass. Then again, how many people believed a decade ago that Wikipedia would grow into the knowledge repository it is today?

“We are trying to radically lower the barrier of entry to map making for organizations and activists,” Gundersen told me last April. Given that they’re up against Google in mapmaking, the relatively tiny DC startup is banking on OpenStreetMap looking more like Wikipedia than Google Knol in a few years.

“Open” is in

Open data is a common thread that connects the winners — but the openness doesn’t stop there. Open maps. Open source. Open government. Open journalism. That this theme has emerged as a strong pulse isn’t a tremendous surprise, given a global movement to apply technology to open government. Moreover, no one should take this to mean that immense amounts of business, society, technology, media and government aren’t still closed. Clearly, that’s not the situation. But there’s a strong case to be made that open is the way of the day.

Data won’t save the world, on its own. However, when data is applied for the public good and put to work, there are a growing number of examples that raise optimism about data’s role in the future of journalism.

Photo Credit: Eric Fisher

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