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August 01 2013

Four short links: 1 August 2013

  1. Tindie Launches Open Designs and Kickbacks (Tindie) — businesses can manufacture the open design as is, or create products derived from it. Those sellers can then kickback a portion of their sales back to the designer. Tindie will handle the disbursement of funds so it’s absolutely painless. For designers, there are no fees, no hosting costs, just a simple way to reap the benefits of their hard work.
  2. HackRF (Kickstarter) — an open source software-defined-radio platform to let you transmit or receive any radio signal from 30 MHz to 6000 MHz on USB power.
  3. Twelve Best Go Practices — to help you get the mindset of Go.
  4. US Code for Download — in XML and other formats. Waaaay after public resource showed them what needed to be done. First slow step of many fast ones, I hope.

April 18 2013

Four short links: 18 April 2013

  1. The Well Deserved Fortune of Satoshi NakamotoI can’t assure with 100% certainty that the all the black dots are owned by Satoshi, but almost all are owned by a single entity, and that entity began mining right from block 1, and with the same performance as the genesis block. It can be identified by constant slope segments that occasionally restart. Also this entity is the only entity that has shown complete trust in Bitcoin, since it hasn’t spend any coins (as last as the eye can see). I estimate at eyesight that Satoshi fortune is around 1M Bitcoins, or 100M USD at current exchange rate. Author’s credible. (via Hacker News)
  2. Houdini (Github) — C library for escaping and unescaping UTF-8-encoded HTML, according to OWASP guidelines.
  3. The $12 Gongkai Phone (Bunnie Huang) — gongkai isn’t a totally lawless free-for-all. It’s a network of ideas, spread peer-to-peer, with certain rules to enforce sharing and to prevent leeching. It’s very different from Western IP concepts, but I’m trying to have an open mind about it.
  4. Jan Chipchase on Google Glass (All Things D) — Any idiot can collect data. The real issue is how to collect data in such a way that meets both moral and legal obligations and still delivers some form of value. An interesting observation, one of many within this overview of the usability and third-party user experience of Google Glass-like UIs.

January 31 2013

NASA launches second International Space Apps Challenge

From April 20 to April 21, on Earth Day, the second international Space Apps Challenge will invite developers on all seven continents to the bridge to contribute code to NASA projects.

space app challengespace app challenge

Given longstanding concerns about the sustainability of apps contests, I was curious about NASA’s thinking behind launching this challenge. When I asked NASA’s open government team about the work, I immediately heard back from Nick Skytland (@Skytland), who heads up NASA’s open innovation team.

“The International Space Apps Challenge was a different approach from other federal government ‘app contests’ held before,” replied Skytland, via email.

“Instead of incentivizing technology development through open data and a prize purse, we sought to create a unique platform for international technological cooperation though a weekend-long event hosted in multiple locations across the world. We didn’t just focus on developing software apps, but actually included open hardware, citizen science, and data visualization as well.”

Aspects of that answer will please many open data advocates, like Clay Johnson or David Eaves. When Eaves recently looked at apps contests, in the context of his work on Open Data Day (coming up on February 23rd), he emphasized the importance of events that build community and applications that meet the needs of citizens or respond to business demand.

The rest of my email interview with Skytland follows.

Why is the International Space Apps Challenge worth doing again?

Nick Skytland: We see the International Space Apps Challenge event as a valuable platform for the Agency because it:

  • Creates new technologies and approaches that can solve some of the key challenges of space exploration, as well as making current efforts more cost-effective.
  • Uses open data and technology to address global needs to improve life on Earth and in space.
  • Demonstrates our commitment to the principles of the Open Government Partnership in a concrete way.

What were the results from the first challenge?

Nick Skytland: More than 100 unique open-source solutions were developed in less then 48 hours.

There were 6 winning apps, but the real “results” of the challenge was a 2,000+ person community engaged in and excited about space exploration, ready to apply that experience to challenges identified by the agency at relatively low cost and on a short timeline.

How does this challenge contribute to NASA’s mission?

Nick Skytland: There were many direct benefits. The first International Space Apps Challenge offered seven challenges specific to satellite hardware and payloads, including submissions from at least two commercial organizations. These challenges received multiple solutions in the areas of satellite tracking, suborbital payloads, command and control systems, and leveraging commercial smartphone technology for orbital remote sensing.

Additionally, a large focus of the Space Apps Challenge is on citizen innovation in the commercial space sector, lowering the cost and barriers to space so that it becomes easier to enter the market. By focusing on citizen entrepreneurship, Space Apps enables NASA to be deeply involved with the quickly emerging space startup culture. The event was extremely helpful in encouraging the collection and dissemination of space-derived data.

As you know, we have amazing open data. Space Apps is a key opportunity for us to continue to open new data sources and invite citizens to use them. Space Apps also encouraged the development of new technologies and new industries, like the space-based 3D printing industry and open-source ROV (remote submersibles for underwater exploration.)

How much of the code from more than 200 “solutions” is still in use?

Nick Skytland: We didn’t track this last time around, but almost all (if not all) of the code is still available online, many of the projects continued on well after the event, and some teams continue to work on their projects today. The best example of this is the Pineapple Project, which participated in numerous other hackathons after the 2012 International Space Apps Challenge and just recently was accepted into the Geeks Without Borders accelerator program.

Of the 71 challenges that were offered last year, a low percentage were NASA challenges — about 13, if I recall correctly. There are many reasons for this, mostly that cultural adoption of open government philosophies within government is just slow. What last year did for us is lay the groundwork. Now we have much more buy-in and interest in what can be done. This year, our challenges from NASA are much more mission-focused and relevant to needs program managers have within the agency.

Additionally, many of the externally submitted challenges we have come from other agencies who are interested in using space apps as a platform to address needs they have. Most notably, we recently worked with the Peace Corps on the Innovation Challenge they offered at RHoK in December 2012, with great results.

The International Space Apps Challenge was a way for us not only to move forward technology development, drawing on the talents and initiative of bright-minded developers, engineers, and technologists, but also a platform to actually engage people who have a passion and desire to make an immediate impact on the world.

What’s new in 2013?

Nick Skytland: Our goal for this year is to improve the platform, create an even better engagement experience, and focus the collective talents of people around the world on develop technological solutions that are relevant and immediately useful.

We have a high level of internal buy-in at NASA and a lot of participation outside NASA, from both other government organizations and local leads in many new locations. Fortunately, this means we can focus our efforts on making this an meaningful event and we are well ahead of the curve in terms of planning to do this.

To date, 44 locations have confirmed their participation and we have six spots remaining, although four of these are reserved as placeholders for cities we are pursuing. We have 50 challenge ideas already drafted for the event, 25 of which come directly from NASA. We will be releasing the entire list of challenges around March 15th on spaceappschallenge.org.

We have 55 organizations so far that are supporting the event, including seven other U.S. government organizations, and international agencies. Embassies or consulates are either directly leading or hosting the events in Monterrey, Krakow, Sofia, Jakarta, Santa Cruz, Rome, London and Auckland.

 

November 22 2012

Four short links: 22 November 2012

  1. Mark Your Territory — Urine integration for Foursquare. (via Beta Knowledge)
  2. TL;DR — news summaries. Finally.
  3. Zombie Ideas and Online InstructionThe repeated return of mistaken ideas captures well my experiences with technologies in schools and what I have researched over decades. The zombie idea that is rapidly being converted into policies that in the past have been “refuted with evidence but refuse to die” is: new technologies can cure K-12 and higher education problems of teaching and learning. The most recent incarnation of this revolving-door idea is widespread access to online instruction in K-12 education cyber-charter schools, blended schools where online instruction occurs for a few hours a day, and mandated courses that children and youth have to take.
  4. Google Open Sources Their Book Scanner — hardware designs for their clever system for high-throughput non-destructive book-scanning. (via Hackaday)

August 03 2012

They promised us flying cars

We may be living in the future, but it hasn’t entirely worked out how we were promised. I remember the predictions clearly: the 21st century was supposed to be full of self-driving cars, personal communicators, replicators and private space ships.

Except, of course, all that has come true. Google just got the first license to drive their cars entirely autonomously on public highways. Apple came along with the iPhone and changed everything. Three-dimensional printers have come out of the laboratories and into the home. And in a few short years, and from a standing start, Elon Musk and SpaceX has achieved what might otherwise have been thought impossible: late last year, SpaceX launched a spacecraft and returned it to Earth safely. Then they launched another, successfully docked it with the International Space Station, and then again returned it to Earth.

The SpaceX Dragon capsule is grappled and berthed to the Earth-facing port of the International Space Station’s Harmony module at 12:02 p.m. EDT, May 25, 2012. Credit: NASA/SpaceX


Right now there is a generation of high-tech tinkerers breaking the seals on proprietary technology and prototyping new ideas, which is leading to a rapid growth in innovation. The members of this generation, who are building open hardware instead of writing open software, seem to have come out of nowhere. Except, of course, they haven’t. Promised a future they couldn’t have, they’ve started to build it. The only difference between them and Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Steve Jobs is that those guys got to build bigger toys than the rest of us.

The dotcom billionaires are regular geeks just like us. They might be the best of us, or sometimes just the luckiest, but they grew up with the same dreams, and they’ve finally given up waiting for governments to build the future they were promised when they were kids. They’re going to build it for themselves.

The thing that’s driving the Maker movement is the same thing that’s driving bigger shifts, like the next space race. Unlike the old space race, pushed by national pride and the hope that we could run fast enough in place so that we didn’t have to start a nuclear war, this new space race is being driven by personal pride, ambition and childhood dreams.

But there are some who don’t see what’s happening, and they’re about to miss out. Case in point: a lot of big businesses are confused by the open hardware movement. They don’t understand it, don’t think it’s worth their while to make exceptions and cater to it. Even the so-called “smart money” doesn’t seem to get it. I’ve heard moderately successful venture capitalists from the Valley say that they “… don’t do hardware.” Those guys are about to lose their shirts.

Makers are geeks like you and me who have decided to go ahead and build the future themselves because the big corporations and the major governments have so singularly failed to do it for us. Is it any surprise that dotcom billionaires are doing the same? Is it any surprise that the future we build is going to look a lot like the future we were promised and not so much like the future we were heading toward?

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