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September 04 2013

How To Infer Topology

How To Infer Topology
http://bost.ocks.org/mike/topology

As its name implies, #topojson is a topological geospatial data format. In contrast to a geometry, where each shape is encoded with separate (and often redundant) arrays of coordinates, a topology encodes sequences of coordinates in line fragments called arcs that can be shared. The main benefit of a topology is that it improves shape simplification by avoiding artifacts that would be caused by simplifying shapes independently. It also enables applications like #map coloring and selective meshing, and makes the format more compact by removing redundant coordinates.

Mike Bostock explique le principe de fonctionnement de l’algo utilisé dans TopoJSON 1.4.0.

#geojson

July 30 2013

UXBlog | IDV Solutions' User Experience : A Breathing Earth

UXBlog | IDV Solutions’ User Experience: A Breathing Earth
http://uxblog.idvsolutions.com/2013/07/a-breathing-earth.html

Here’s a view looking at one year of seasonal transformations on Earth. Made possible by the tremendous folks of the NASA Visible Earth team, I downloaded the twelve cloud-free satellite imagery mosaics of Earth (“Blue Marble Next Generation”) at each month of the year. I wrapped them into some fun projections then stitched them together into a couple animated gifs... (...)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QvY-NnY2Sik/UfaqNSITAwI/AAAAAAAACyc/7-Y2MN2oPlE/s400/BreathingEarth.gif

#map #animation

July 26 2013

geojson.io - macwright.org

#geojson.io - macwright.org
http://macwright.org/2013/07/26/geojsonio.html

geojson.io is for drawing, changing, and sharing GeoJSON-formatted #map data.

http://i.imgur.com/tAyrkKB.gif

http://geojson.io

#debug

July 23 2013

Interactive map: bike movements in New York City and Washington, D.C.

From midnight to 7:30 A.M., New York is uncharacteristically quiet, its Citibikes–the city’s new shared bicycles–largely stationary and clustered in residential neighborhoods. Then things begin to move: commuters check out the bikes en masse in residential areas across Manhattan and, over the next two hours, relocate them to Midtown, the Flatiron district, SoHo, and Wall Street. There they remain concentrated, mostly used for local trips, until they start to move back outward around 5 P.M.

Washington, D.C.’s bike-share program exhibits a similar pattern, though, as you’d expect, the movement starts a little earlier in the morning. On my animated map, both cities look like they’re breathing–inhaling and then exhaling once over the course of 12 hours or so.

The map below shows availability at bike stations in New York City and the Washington, D.C. area across the course of the day. Solid blue dots represent completely-full bike stations; white dots indicate empty bike stations. Click on any station to see a graph of average availability over time. I’ve written a few thoughts on what this means about the program below the graphic.

We can see some interesting patterns in the bike share data here. First of all, use of bikes for commuting is evidently highest in the residential areas immediately adjacent to dense commercial areas. That makes sense; a bike commute from the East Village to Union Square is extremely easy, and that’s also the sort of trip that tends to be surprisingly difficult by subway. The more remote bike stations in Brooklyn and Arlington exhibit fairly flat availability profiles over the course of the day, suggesting that to the degree they’re used at all, it’s mostly for local trips.

A bit about the map: I built this by scraping the data feeds that underlie the New York and Washington real-time availability maps every 10 minutes and storing them in a database. (Here is New York’s feed; here is Washington’s.) I averaged availability by station in 10-minute increments over seven weekdays of collected data. The map uses JavaScript (mostly jQuery) to manipulate an SVG image–changing opacity of bike-share stations depending to represent availability and rendering a graph every time a station is clicked. I used Python and MySQL for the back-end work of collecting the data, aggregating it, and publishing it to a JSON file that the front-end code downloads and parses.

This map, by the way, is an extremely simple example of what’s possible when the physical world is instrumented and programmable. I’ve written about sensor-laden machinery in my research report on the industrial internet, and we plan to continue our work on the programmable world in the coming months.

June 28 2013

GREAT : un fond de carte généralisé et libre de droit des régions européennes | Carnet…

GREAT : un fond de carte généralisé et libre de droit des régions européennes | Carnet cartographique
http://neocarto.hypotheses.org/244

Le GREAT (Fond généralisé des régions européennes pour l'aménagement du territoire – Generalised Representation for European Areas and Territories) est un fond de carte libre de droit à l'echelle des régions européennes réalisé par l'UMS 2414 RIATE. Ce fond de carte est gratuit et libre d'utilisation. Il est protégé par la licence licence Creative Commons (Paternité – Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale – Partage à (...)

#map #shapefile #europe

February 03 2012

Visualization of the Week: Mapping Mexico's drug war

Diego Valle-Jones has created a powerful interactive map of the ongoing drug war in Mexico.

The interactive map lets you compare homicides and drug-related homicides, with the option to examine marijuana, opium, and drug-lab-related homicides. If you click on a bubble, you can see the number of murders over time, dating back to 2004. Important events are highlighted on that time line. You can also draw a shape on the map to look at a particular region.

Map of the drug war in Mexico
Click to see the full interactive version of "Map of the Drug War in Mexico."


Valle-Jones writes:

"To unclutter the map and following the lead of the paper Trafficking Networks and the Mexican Drug War by Melissa Dell, I decided to only show the optimal highways (according to my own data and Google Directions) to reach the US border ports from the municipalities with the highest drug plant eradication between 1994 and 2003 and the highest 2d density estimate of drug labs based on newspaper reports of seizures. The map is a work in progress and is still missing the cocaine routes, but hopefully I'll be able to add them shortly."

The data can be exported to CSV, and the source code is available on Github.

Found a great visualization? Tell us about it

This post is part of an ongoing series exploring visualizations. We're always looking for leads, so please drop a line if there's a visualization you think we should know about.

Strata 2012 — The 2012 Strata Conference, being held Feb. 28-March 1 in Santa Clara, Calif., will offer three full days of hands-on data training and information-rich sessions. Strata brings together the people, tools, and technologies you need to make data work.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

More Visualizations:

December 16 2011

Visualization of the Week: Mapping traffic casualties

The web-like patterns of British auto travel in the visualization below are quite beautiful — that is, until you discover it's a map of traffic casualties. The visualization depicts the locations of more than two million road crashes in the UK between 1999 and 2010. Each light point on the map represents a collision that resulted in a casualty; the brighter the light, the more frequently collisions occurred in that spot.

BBC traffic visualization
Screenshot from the BBC's traffic accident visualization. See the full version.

The original map was created by the BBC and can be viewed here. Accompanying the map is a video animation of the crash data, along with more detailed information about particular areas. Visitors to the site can enter their address information to see local crash data, broken down by time and by vehicle type.

Found a great visualization? Tell us about it

This post is part of an ongoing series exploring visualizations. We're always looking for leads, so please drop a line if there's a visualization you think we should know about.

Strata 2012 — The 2012 Strata Conference, being held Feb. 28-March 1 in Santa Clara, Calif., will offer three full days of hands-on data training and information-rich sessions. Strata brings together the people, tools, and technologies you need to make data work.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

More Visualizations:

September 09 2011

Visualization of the Week: Mapping U.S. Job Losses

The U.S. observed the Labor Day holiday this week, which means pundits and politicians alike were apt to talk about jobs. The news on the jobs front hasn't been good lately, most recently with a report from the Labor Department indicating no jobs growth and revising figures from earlier months to paint a pretty grim picture for the unemployment rate. That rate now hovers around 9.1%.

TIP Strategies has recently released an updated version of its Geography of Jobs visualization, an animated map that makes job stats even more striking — and dour. Based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the map provides a historical timeline — starting in 2004 — of regions where jobs have been added and lost.

Geography of Jobs visualization
Screen from the Geography of Jobs. See the full interactive visualization.

Found a great visualization? Tell us about it

This post is part of an ongoing series exploring visualizations. We're always looking for leads, so please drop a line if there's a visualization you think we should know about.

Strata Conference New York 2011, being held Sept. 22-23, covers the latest and best tools and technologies for data science — from gathering, cleaning, analyzing, and storing data to communicating data intelligence effectively.

Save 30% on registration with the code STN11RAD



More Visualizations:


August 04 2011

Strata Week: Hadoop adds security to its skill set

Here are a few of the data stories that caught my eye this week.

Where big data and security collide

HadoopCould security be the next killer app for Hadoop? That's what GigaOm's Derrick Harris suggests: "The open-source, data-processing tool is already popular for search engines, social-media analysis, targeted marketing and other applications that can benefit from clusters of machines churning through unstructured data — now it's turning its attention to security data." Noting the universality of security concerns, Harris suggests that "targeted applications" using Hadoop might be a solid starting point for mainstream businesses to adopt the technology.

Juniper Networks' Chris Hoff has also analyzed the connections between big data and security in a couple of recent posts on his Rational Survivability blog. Hoff contends that while we've had the capabilities to analyze security-related data for some time, that's traditionally happened with specialized security tools, meaning that insights are "often disconnected from the transaction and value of the asset from which they emanate."

Hoff continues:

Even when we do start to be able to integrate and correlate event, configuration, vulnerability or logging data, it's very IT-centric. It's very INFRASTRUCTURE-centric. It doesn't really include much value about the actual information in use/transit or the implication of how it's being consumed or related to.

But as both Harris and Hoff argue, Hadoop might help address this as it can handle all an organization's unstructured data and can enable security analysis that isn't "disconnected." And both Harris and Hoff point to Zettaset as an example of a company that is tackling big data and security analysis by using Hadoop.


Strata Conference New York 2011, being held Sept. 22-23, covers the latest and best tools and technologies for data science -- from gathering, cleaning, analyzing, and storing data to communicating data intelligence effectively.

Save 20% on registration with the code STN11RAD


What's your most important personal data?

Concerns about data security also occur at the personal level. To that end, The Locker Project, Singly's open source project to help people collect and control their personal data, recently surveyed people about the data they see as most important.

The survey asked people to choose from the following: contacts, messages, events, check-ins, links, photos, music, movies, or browser history. The results are in, and no surprise: photos were listed as the most important, with 37% of respondents (67 out of 179) selecting that option. Forty-six people listed their contacts, and 23 said their messages were most important.

Interestingly, browser history, events, and check-ins were rated the lowest. As Singly's Tom Longson ponders:

Do people not care about where they went? Is this data considered stale to most people, and therefore irrelevant? I personally believe I can create a lot of value from Browser History and Check-ins. For example, what websites are my friends going to that I'm not? Also, what places should I be going that I'm not? These are just a couple of ideas.

But just as revealing as the ranking of data were the reasons that people gave for why certain types were most important, as you can see in the word cloud created from their responses.

Singly word cloud from data surveyClick to enlarge. See Singly's associated analysis of this data.

House panel moves forward on data retention law

The U.S. Congress is in recess now, but among the last-minute things it accomplished before vacation was passage by the House Judiciary Committee of "The Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act of 2011." Ostensibly aimed at helping track pedophiles and pornographers online, the bill has raised a number of concerns about Internet data and surveillance. If passed, the law would require, among other things, that Internet companies collect and retain the IP addresses of all users for at least one year.

Representative Zoe Lofgren was one of the opponents of the legislation in committee, trying unsuccessfully to introduce amendments that would curb its data retention requirements. She also tried to have the name of the law changed to the "Keep Every American's Digital Data for Submission to the Federal Government Without a Warrant Act of 2011."

In addition to concerns over government surveillance, TechDirt's Mike Masnick and the Cato Institute's Julian Sanchez have also pointed to the potential security issues that could arise from lengthy data retention requirements. Sanchez writes:

If I started storing big piles of gold bullion and precious gems in my home, my previously highly secure apartment would suddenly become laughably insecure, without my changing my security measures at all. If a company significantly increases the amount of sensitive or valuable information stored in its systems — because, for example, a government mandate requires them to keep more extensive logs — then the returns to a single successful intrusion (as measured by the amount of data that can be exfiltrated before the breach is detected and sealed) increase as well. The costs of data retention need to be measured not just in terms of terabytes, or man hours spent reconfiguring routers. The cost of detecting and repelling a higher volume of more sophisticated attacks has to be counted as well.

New data from a very old map

Gough MapAnd in more pleasant "storing old data" news: the Gough Map, the oldest surviving map of Great Britain, dating back to the 14th century, has now been digitized and made available online.

The project to digitize the map, which now resides in Oxford University's Bodleian Library took 15 months to complete. According to the Bodleian, the project explored the map's "'linguistic geographies,' that is the writing used on the map by the scribes who created it, with the aim of offering a re-interpretation of the Gough Map's origins, provenance, purpose and creation of which so little is known."

Among the insights gleaned includes the revelation that the text on the Gough Map is the work of at least two different scribes — one from the 14th century and a later one, from the 15th century, who revised some pieces. Furthermore, it was also discovered that the map was made closer to 1375 than 1360, the data often given to it.

Got data news?

Feel free to email me.



Related:


August 31 2010

Points of Control: The Web 2.0 Summit Map

In my blog post State of the Internet Operating System a few months ago (and the followup Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars), I used the analogy of "the Great Game" played out between England and Russia in the late Victorian era for control of access to India through what is now Afghanistan. In our planning for this year's Web 2.0 Summit, John Battelle and I have expanded on this metaphor, exploring the many ways that Internet companies at all levels of the stack are looking for points of control that will give them competitive advantage in the years to come.

Now, John has developed that idea even further, with a super-cool interactive map that shows the Internet platform wars in a kind of fantasy landscape, highlighting each of the players and some of the moves they might make against each other. Click on the link at the top of the image below to get to the full interactive version. You might also want to read John Battelle's description of the points of control map and how to use it.

Some of the battlegrounds are already clear, as Google has entered the phone hardware market to match Apple's early lead, while Apple is ramping up its presence in advertising and location-based services to try to catch up to Google. Meanwhile, Facebook adds features to compete with Twitter and Foursquare, Google (and everyone else) keeps trying to find the magic bullet for social networking, and tries to eat Yelp's lunch with Place Pages, Microsoft gains share in search and tries again to become a player in the phone market. Areas like social gaming, payment, speech and image recognition, location services, advertising, tablets and other new form factors for connected devices, are all rife with new startups, potential acquisition plays, and straight-up competition.

In the map, we've tried to highlight some of the possible competitive vectors. I'm sure you'll have other ideas about companies, possible lines of attack, and possible alliances. We hope to hear your feedback, and we hope to see you at the Web 2.0 Summit, where we'll be talking with many of the key players, and handicapping the next stage of the Great Game.




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