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September 21 2014

Allgemeine Zeitung

Autor: Cotta, Johann Friedrich von
Erschienen 1872
BSB-Signatur 4 Eph.pol. 50-1872,12

URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb00085285-8

Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

September 19 2014

Comment Israël « forme » des journalistes étrangers

Du 30 août au 4 septembre s'est déroulée à Tel-Aviv une formation tous frais payés par le gouvernement israélien pour « apprendre à parler d'un conflit de manière neutre et professionnelle ». Au programme, des conférences sur le terrorisme et les sujets militaires et politiques, un « tour stratégique » de Jérusalem et des zones de conflit, et des rencontres et échanges avec des leaders politiques, des universitaires et des journalistes israéliens. Trente journalistes du monde entier, triés sur le volet, y ont participé. Source: Orient XXI
Reposted fromcheg00 cheg00

July 23 2014

4351 649d 500

Einen aussagekräftigeren Nachweis über seine meinungsbildende Nachhaltigkeit hätte sich der hochklassige deutschsprachige Qualitätsjounalismus nicht wünschen können.

Spiegel-online link via fefe
Reposted bydarksideofthemoon darksideofthemoon

January 29 2014


Diese Methode hat System. Wer gegen eine stärkere Beteiligung der Wohlhabenden an den Folgekosten der Krise argumentieren will, wäre schlecht beraten, bei der Bevölkerungsmehrheit im Namen der Wohlhabenden auf die Tränendrüse zu drücken. Das Mitgefühl mit millionenschweren griechischen Reedern oder steinreichen spanischen Bauunternehmern dürfte nicht sonderlich groß sein. Erfolgversprechender ist es da schon, die Mehrheit glauben zu machen, sie selbst sei das eigentliche Opfer einer Vermögensbesteuerung. Die Methode hat auch Tradition. Schon lange ist es Ziel einer Politik, die sich vor allem für die Interessen der Wohlhabenden einsetzt, die Bevölkerungsmehrheit mit ins Boot zu holen. Satirisch zugespitzt hat dies Klaus Staeck in seinem 1972 erstellten Plakat „Deutsche Arbeiter! Die SPD will euch eure Villen im Tessin wegnehmen“. Die dazugehörenden Mechanismen hat Ulrike Herrmann in ihrem Buch „Hurra wir dürfen zahlen – der Selbstbetrug der Mittelschicht“ seziert.

Die „Deutschen Wirtschaftsnachrichten“ und ihre „Zwangsabgaben auf Sparguthaben“ | 2014-01-27 via offene Ablage: nothing to hide -
Reposted bykrekk krekk

January 23 2014

Four short links: 23 January 2014

  1. Microsoft Research Adopts Open Access Policy for Publications — +1
  2. Light Table is Open Source — this matters because these experiments in semantic interactivity inform technical UIs of the future, and the more ubiquitous this code is then the more effect it can have and the sooner we can have the future.
  3. The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze and Astound You (New Yorker) — Berger and Milkman found that two features predictably determined an article’s success: how positive its message was and how much it excited its reader. The obvious part is that we develop immunity to things that catch our attention: our brains are well-developed systems for filtering, and the only constant is that advertisers will need novelty.
  4. The Story of Holacracy’s Founder (Quartz) — background on the interesting flat organisation culture system that’s gaining traction in startups.

December 02 2013

Four short links: 2 December 2013

  1. CalTech Machine Learning Video Library — a pile of video introductions to different machine learning concepts.
  2. Awesome Pokemon Hack — each inventory item has a number associated with it, they are kept at a particular memory location, and there’s a glitch in the game that executes code at that location so … you can program by assembling items and then triggering the glitch. SO COOL.
  3. Drone Footage of Bangkok Protests — including water cannons.
  4. The Mature Optimization Handbook — free, well thought out, and well written. My favourite line: In exchange for that saved space, you have created a hidden dependency on clairvoyance.

November 25 2013

Four Short Links: 25 November 2013

  1. Drone Journalism“The newspaper was for still images,” said Mr. Whyld, who builds his own drones, “but the Internet is for this.” is the money shot from a NY Times piece (not linked to directly, as is paywalled)
  2. Best UX Patterns for Mobile Web Apps (Luke Wroblewski) — advice from Google Chrome Dev Summit.
  3. You Don’t Know JS (Github) — book in progress, funded by a Kickstarter.
  4. SparkA Chrome app based development environment with a reusable library of GUI widgets.

September 07 2013

Egypt : crackdown on journalists continues

Egypt : crackdown on journalists continues

Ismailia’s military prosecution detains award-winning Sinai journalist Abu Deraa for 15 days.

Award-winning Sinai journalist, Ahmed Abu Deraa, was detained for 15 days, claimed Al-Masry Al-Youm, the newspaper Abu Deraa works for.

The newspaper said that Abu Deraa is accused of publishing false news concerning the armed forces.

The Office of the Military Spokesperson refused to disclose the Abu Deraa’s charges. They said that Abu Deraa’s arrest happened near an army camp in Arish. They denied that he is a journalist as he “does not hold the Press Syndicate ID”, adding that he also did not possess a license to go into military-restricted areas in Sinai.

#medias #presse #armée #army #journalism #justice

August 14 2013

What is wrong with Italian Reality TV ?

What is wrong with Italian Reality TV?

The show hasn’t been broadcasted yet, but aid workers, non profit volunteers and some viewers from all over the Italy have already launched two petitions to prevent the airing of a new reality show, “Mission,” in which eight Italian celebrities embark on a mission to help aid workers in the refugee camps of South Sudan, the Democratic Republic […]


August 12 2013

Four short links: 14 August 2013

  1. bookcision — bookmarklet to download your Kindle highlights. (via Nelson Minar)
  2. Algorithm for a Perfectly Balanced Photo Gallery — remember this when it comes time to lay out your 2013 “Happy Holidays!” card.
  3. Long Stories (Fast Company Labs) — Our strategy was to still produce feature stories as discrete articles, but then to tie them back to the stub article with lots of prominent links, again taking advantage of the storyline and context we had built up there, making our feature stories sharper and less full of catch-up material.
  4. Massachusetts Software Tax (Fast Company Labs) — breakdown of why this crappily-written law is bad news for online companies. Laws are the IEDs of the Internet: it’s easy to make massively value-destroying regulation and hard to get it fixed.

July 25 2013

National_Geographic explores Zimbabwe's pre-election pulse

#National_Geographic explores #Zimbabwe’s pre-election pulse

Two initial thoughts on #Alexandra_Fuller’s “Breaking the Silence: Oppression, Fear, and Courage in Zimbabwe” in the May 2013 National Geographic Magazine: First, anything by Alexandra Fuller will be an excellent read, and second, how will the photos accompanying the text manage to portray Zimbabwe? The first time I read the article was on a [...]


July 24 2013

Sympathy for the ‘Devil'

Sympathy for the ‘Devil’

This past Sunday’s #New_York_Times features a delightful article (“A Visit From the Devil: Feared Traditional Priest From #Ghana Spends a Year in the Bronx“) on Ghanaian priest Nana #Kwaku_Bonsam’s year-long residency in the Bronx. Reporter Jed Lipinki is fairly non-judgmental and respectful in his depiction of what is commonly called #African_traditional_religion (ATR), [...]


March 22 2013

Sensoring the news

When I went to the 2013 SXSW Interactive Festival to host a conversation with NPR’s Javaun Moradi about sensors, society and the media, I thought we would be talking about the future of data journalism. By the time I left the event, I’d learned that sensor journalism had long since arrived and been applied. Today, inexpensive, easy-to-use open source hardware is making it easier for media outlets to create data themselves.

“Interest in sensor data has grown dramatically over the last year,” said Moradi. “Groups are experimenting in the areas of environmental monitoring, journalism, human rights activism, and civic accountability.” His post on what sensor networks mean for journalism sparked our collaboration after we connected in December 2011 about how data was being use in the media.

AP Beijing Air Quality graphicAP Beijing Air Quality graphic

Associated Press visualization of Beijing air quality. See related feature.

At a SXSW panel on “sensoring the news,” Sarah Williams, an assistant professor at MIT, described how the Civic Data Design Project had partnered with the Associated Press to independently measure air quality in Beijing.

Prior to the 2008 Olympics, the coaches of the Olympic teams had expressed serious concern about the impact of air pollution on the athletes. That, in turn, put pressure on the Chinese government to take substantive steps to improve those conditions. While the Chinese government released an index of air quality, explained Williams, they didn’t explain what went into it, nor did they provide the raw data.

The Beijing Air Tracks project arose from the need to determine what the conditions on the ground really were. AP reporters carried sensors connected to their cellphones to detect particulate and carbon monoxide levels, enabling them to report air quality conditions back in real-time as they moved around the Olympic venues and city.

The sensor data helped the AP measure the effect of policy decisions that the Chinese government made, said Williams, from closing down factories to widespread shutdowns of different kinds of industries. The results from the sensor journalism project, which showed a decrease in particulates but conditions 12 to 25 times worse than New York City on certain days, were published as an interactive data visualization.

AP Beijing mash-up of particulate levels and photography in Beijing.AP Beijing mash-up of particulate levels and photography in Beijing.

Associated Press mashup of particulate levels and photography at the Olympic stadium in Beijing over time.

This AP project is a prime example of how sensors, data journalism, and old-fashioned, on-the-ground reporting can be combined to shine a new level of accountability on official reports. It won’t be the last time this happens, either. Around the world, from the Amazon to Los Angeles to Japan, sensor data is now being put to use by civic media and journalists.

Sensing civic media

There are an increasing number of sensors in our lives, said John Keefe, a data news editor for WNYC, speaking at his SXSW panel in Austin. From the physical sensors in smartphones to new possibilities built with Arduino or Raspberry Pi hardware, Keefe highlighted how journalists could seize hold of new possibilities.

“Google takes data from maps and Android phones and creates traffic data,” Keefe said. “In a sense, that’s sensor data being used live in a public service. What are we doing in journalism like that? What could we do?”

The evolution of Safecast offers a glimpse of networked accountability, collecting and publishing radiation data through sensors, citizen science and the Internet. The project, which won last year’s Knight News Challenge on data, is now building the infrastructure to enable people to help monitor air quality in Los Angeles.

Sensor journalism is also being applied to make sense of the world in using remote sensing data and satellite imagery. The director of that project, Gustavo Faleiros, recently described how environmental reporting can be combined with civic media to collect data, with relevant projects in Asia, Africa and the Americas. For instance, Faleiros cited an environmental monitoring project led by Eric Paulos of the University of California at Berkeley’s Center for New Media, where sensors on taxis were used to gather data in Accra, Ghana.

Another direction that sensor data could be applied lies in social justice and education. At SXSW, Sarah Williams described [slides] how the Air Quality Egg, an open source hardware device, is being used to make an argument for public improvements. At the Cypress Hills Community School, kids are bringing the eggs home, measuring air quality and putting data online, said Williams.

Air Quality Eggs at Cypress Hill Community SchoolAir Quality Eggs at Cypress Hill Community School

Air Quality Eggs at Cypress Hill Community School.

“Health sensors are useful when they can compare personal real-time data against population-wide data,” said Nadav Aharony, who also spoke on our panel in Austin.

Aharony talked about how Behavio, a startup based upon his research on smartphones and data at MIT, has created funf, an open source sensing toolkit for Android devices. Aharony’s team has now deployed an integration with Dropbox that requires no coding ability to use.

According to Aharony, the One Laptop Per Child project is using funf in tablets deployed in Africa, in areas where there are no schools. Researchers will use funf as a behavioral tool to sense how children are interacting with the devices, including whether tablets are next to one another.

Sensing citizen science

While challenges lie ahead, it’s clear that sensors will be used to create data where there was none before. At SXSW, Williams described a project in Nairobi, Kenya, where cellphones are being used to map informal bus systems.

The Digital Matatus project is publishing the data into the General Transit Feed Standard, one of the most promising emerging global standards for transit data. “Hopefully, a year from now [we] will have all the bus routes from Nairobi,” Williams said.

Map of Matatus stops in Nairobi, KenyaMap of Matatus stops in Nairobi, Kenya

Map of Matatus stops in Nairobi, Kenya

Data journalism has long depended upon official data released by agencies. In recent years, data journalists have begun scraping data. Sensors allow another step in that evolution to take place, where civic media can create data to inform the public interest.

Matt Waite, a professor of practice and head of the Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, joined the panel in Austin using a Google Hangout and shared how he and his students are experimenting with sensors to gather data for projects.

Journalists are going to run up against stories where no one has data, he said. “The old way was to give up,” said Waite. “I don’t think that’s the way to do it.”

Sensors give journalists a new, interesting way to enlist a distributed audience in gathering needed data, he explained. “Is it ‘capital N’ news? Probably not,” said Waite. “But it’s something people are really interested in. The easy part is getting a parts list together and writing software. The hard part is the creative process it takes to figure out what we are going to measure and what it means.”

In an interview with the Nieman Journalism Lab on sensor journalism, Waite also raised practical concerns with the quality of data collection that can be gathered with inexpensive hardware. “One legitimate concern about doing this is, you’re talking about doing it with the cheapest software you can find,” Waite told the Nieman Lab’s Caroline O’Donovan. “It’s not expertly calibrated. It’s not as sensitive as it possibly could be.”

Those are questions that will be explored practically in New York in the months ahead, when New York City’s public radio station will be collaborating with the Columbia School of Public Health to collect data about New York’s environmental conditions. They’ll put particulate detectors, carbon dioxide monitors, leg motion sensors, audio monitors, cameras and GPS trackers on bicycles and ride around the city collecting pollution data.

“At WNYC, we already do crowdsourcing, where we ask our audience to do something,” said Keefe. “What if we could get our audience to do something with this? What if you could get an audience to work with you to solve a problem?”

Keefe also announced the Cicada Project, where WNYC is inviting its listeners to build homemade sensors and track the emergence of cicadas this spring across New Jersey, New York and the Northeast region.

This cicada tracker project is a 21st century parallel to the role that birders have played for decades in the annual Christmas Bird Count, creating new horizons for citizen science and public media.

Update: WNYC’s public is responding in interesting ways that go beyond donations. On Twitter, Keefe highlighted the work of a NYC-based hacker, Guan, who was able to make a cicada tracker for $20, 1/4 the cost of WNYC’s kit.

Sensing challenges ahead

Just as civic technologists need to be mindful of “solutionism,” so too will data journalists need to be aware of the “sensorism” that exists in the health care world, as John Wilbanks pointed out this winter.

“Sensorism is rife in the sciences,” Wilbanks wrote. “Pick a data generation task that used to be human centric and odds are someone is trying to automate and parallelize it (often via solutionism, oddly — there’s an app to generate that data). What’s missing is the epistemic transformation that makes the data emerging from sensors actually useful to make a scientific conclusion — or a policy decision supposedly based on a scientific consensus.”

Anyone looking to practice sensor journalism will face interesting challenges, from incorrect conclusions based upon faulty data to increased risks to journalists carrying the sensors, to gaming or misreporting.

“Data accuracy is both a real and a perceived problem,” said Moradi at SXSW. “Third-party verification by journalists or other non-aligned groups may be needed.”

Much as in the cases of “drone journalism” and data journalism, context, usage and ethics have to be considered before you launch a quadcopter, fire up a scraper or embed sensors around your city. The question you come back to is whether you’re facing a new ethical problem or an old ethical problem with new technology, suggested Waite at SXSW. “The truth is, most ethical issues you can find with a new analogue.”

It may be, however, that sensor data, applied to taking a “social MRI” or other uses, may present us with novel challenges. For instance, who owns the data? Who can access or use it? Under what conditions?

A GPS device is a form of sensor, after all, and one that’s quite useful to law enforcement. While the Supreme Court ruled that the use of a GPS device for tracking a person without a warrant was unconstitutional, sensor data from cellphones may provide law enforcement with equal or greater insight into a target’s movements. Journalists may well face unexpected questions about protecting sources if their sensor data captures the movements or actions of a person of interest.

“There’s a lot of concern around privacy,” said Moradi. “What data can the government request? Will private companies abuse personal data for marketing or sales? Do citizens have the right to personal data held by companies and government?”

Aharony outlined many of the issues in a 2011 paper on stealing reality, exploring what happens when criminals become data scientists.

“It’s like a slow-moving attack if you attach yourself to someone’s communication,” said Aharony, in a follow-up interview in Austin. “‘iPhonegate‘ didn’t surprise people who know about mobile app data or how the cellular network is architected. Look at what happened to Path. You can make mistakes without meaning to. You have to think about this and encrypt the data.”

This post is part of our series investigating data journalism.

March 18 2013

Why I’m changing my tune on paywalls

The Pew Research Center is out with its annual “State of the News Media” report. Much of it is what you’d expect: newspapers and local television are struggling, mobile is rising, digital revenue hasn’t — and can’t — replace traditional print revenue, and on and on.

But read carefully, and you’ll find hope.

For example, Pew says the embrace of paywalls might improve the quality of the content:

“The rise of digital paid content could also have a positive impact on the quality of journalism as news organizations strive to produce unique and high-quality content that the public believes is worth paying for.”

I used to criticize paywalls. I thought they could only work for specialized content or material that’s attached to a desired outcome (i.e. subscribe to the Wall Street Journal, use the insights to make money).

My concern was that publishers would slam walls around their existing content and ask people to pay for an experience that had once been free. That made no sense. Who wants to pay for slideshows and link bait and general news?

But content that’s “worth paying for” is a different thing altogether. Publishers who go this route are acknowledging that a price tag requires justification.

Will it work? Maybe. What I might pay is different than what you might pay. There’s that pesky return-on-investment thing to consider as well.

However, my bigger takeaway — and this is why I’m changing my tune on paywalls — is that value is now part of the paywall equation. That’s a good start.

March 01 2013

Four short links: 1 March 2013

  1. Drone Journalismtwo universities in the US have already incorporated drone use in their journalism programs. The Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska and the Missouri Drone Journalism Program at the University of Missouri both teach journalism students how to make the most of what drones have to offer when reporting a story. They also teach students how to fly drones, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations and ethics.
  2. passivednsA network sniffer that logs all DNS server replies for use in a passive DNS setup.
  3. IFLA E-Lending Background Paper (PDF) — The global dominance of English language eBook title availability reinforced by eReader availability is starkly evident in the statistics on titles available by country: in the USA: 1,000,000; UK: 400,000; Germany/France: 80,000 each; Japan: 50,000; Australia: 35,000; Italy: 20,000; Spain: 15,000; Brazil: 6,000. Many more stats in this paper prepared as context for the International Federation of Library Associations.
  4. The god Architecturea scalable, performant, persistent, in-memory data structure server. It allows massively distributed applications to update and fetch common data in a structured and sorted format. Its main inspirations are Redis and Chord/DHash. Like Redis it focuses on performance, ease of use and a small, simple yet powerful feature set, while from the Chord/DHash projects it inherits scalability, redundancy, and transparent failover behaviour.

February 17 2013

Science Podcast – Scientists’ Understanding of the Public [Feb 17, 2013]

Science Podcast host Sarah Crespi speaks with Hans Peter Peters about how scientists in different countries and age groups think about public engagement.

January 30 2013

January 02 2013

Four short links: 2 January 2013

  1. 2013 Spring PenAppsa student-run hackathon held at the University of Pennsylvania, biggest university hackathon in the world. (via Jim Stogdill)
  2. uncrustifySource Code Beautifier for C, C++, C#, ObjectiveC, D, Java, Pawn and VALA.
  3. Mirror of 28C3 Talks — all the talks from the 28th Chaos Computer Congress. (via Reddit)
  4. SuBMoJour — Sustainable Business Models for Journalism — International research on 69 journalistic pure players and their business models. (via Stijn Debrouwere)

December 21 2012

Six ways data journalism is making sense of the world, around the world

When I wrote that Radar was investigating data journalism and asked for your favorite examples of good work, we heard back from around the world.

I received emails from Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Canada and Italy that featured data visualization, explored the role of data in government accountability, and shared how open data can revolutionize environmental reporting. A tweet pointed me to a talk about how R is being used in the newsroom. Another tweet linked to relevant interviews on social science and the media:

Two of the case studies focused on data visualization, an important practice that my colleague Julie Steele and other editors at O’Reilly Media have been exploring over the past several years.

Several other responses are featured at more length below. After you read through, make sure to also check out this terrific Ignite talk on data journalism recorded at this year’s Newsfoo in Arizona.

Visualizing civic health

Meredith Broussard, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, sent us a link to a recent data journalism project she did for Hidden City Philadelphia, which won an award from the National Council on Citizenship and the Knight Foundation. The project, measuring Philadelphia’s civic health, won honorable mention in Knight’s civic data challenge. Data visualization was a strong theme among the winners of that challenge.

Data journalism in PhiladelphiaData journalism in Philadelphia

Mapping ambulance response times

I profiled the data journalism work of The Los Angeles Times earlier this year, when I interviewed news developer Ben Welsh about the newspaper’s Data Desk, a team of reporters and web developers that specializes in maps, databases, analysis and visualization.

Recently, the Data Desk made an interactive visualization that mapped how fast the Los Angeles Fire Department responds to calls.

LA Times fire response timesLA Times fire response times

Visualizing UK government spending

The Guardian Datablog is one of the best sources of interesting, relevant data journalism work, from sports to popular culture to government accountability. Every post demonstrates an emerging practice when its editors make it possible for readers to download the data themselves. Earlier this month, the Datablog put government spending in the United Kingdom under the microscope and accompanied it with a downloadable graphic (PDF).

The Guardian’s data journalism is particularly important as the British government continues to invest in open data. In June, the United Kingdom’s Cabinet Office relaunched and released a new open data white paper. The British government is doubling down on the notion that open data can be a catalyst for increased government transparency, civic utility and economic prosperity. The role of data journalism in delivering those outcomes is central.

(Note: A separate Radar project is digging into the open data economy.)

An Italian data job

The Italian government, while a bit behind the pace set in the UK, has made more open data available since it launched a national platform in 2011.

Elisabetta Tola, an Italian data journalist, wrote in to share her work on a series of Wired Magazine articles that feature data on seismic risk assessment in Italian schools. The interactive lets parents search for schools, a feature that embodies service journalism and offers more value than a static map.

Italian schools and earthquakes visualizationItalian schools and earthquakes visualization

Tola highlighted a key challenge in Italy that exists in many other places around the world: How can data journalism be practiced in countries that do not have a Freedom of Information Act or a tradition of transparency on government actions and spending? If you have ideas, please share them in the comments or email me.

Putting satellite imagery to work

Brazil, by way of contrast, notably passed a freedom of information law this past year, fulfilling one of its commitments to the Open Government Partnership.

Earlier this year, when I traveled to Brazil to moderate a panel at the historic partnership’s annual meeting, I met Gustavo Faleiros, a journalist working with open data focusing on the Amazon rainforest. Faleiros is as a Knight International Journalism Fellow, in partnership with Washington-based organizations International Center for Journalists and Internews. Today, Faleiros continues that work as the project coordinator for, a beautiful mashup of open data, maps and storytelling.

Faleiros explained that the partnership is training Brazilian journalists to use satellite imagery and collect data related to forest fires and carbon monoxide. He shared this video that shows a data visualization that came out of that work:

As 2012 comes to an end, the rate of Amazon deforestation has dropped to record lows. These tools help the world see what’s happening from high above.

Data-driven broadcast journalism?

I also heard about work in much colder climes when Keith Robinson wrote in from Canada. “As part of large broadcast organizations, one thing that is very satisfying about data journalism is that it often puts our digital staff in the driver’s seat — what starts as an online investigation often becomes the basis for original and exclusive broadcast content,” he wrote in an email.

Robinson, the senior producer for specials and interactive at Global News in Canada, highlighted several examples of their Data Desk’s work, including:

Robinson expects 2013 will see further investment and expansion in the data journalism practice at Global News.

Robinson also pointed to a practice that media should at least consider adopting: Global News is not only consuming and displaying open data, but also publishing the data they receive from the Canadian government. “As we make access to information requests, we’re trying to make the data received available to the public,” he wrote.

From the big picture to next steps

It was instructive to learn more about the work of two large media organizations, the Los Angeles Times and Canada’s Global News, which have been building their capacity to practice data journalism. The other international perspectives in my inbox and tweet stream, however, were a reminder that big-city newsrooms that can afford teams of programmers and designers aren’t the only players here.

To put it another way, acts of data journalism by small teams or individuals aren’t just plausible, they’re happening — from Italy to Brazil to Africa. That doesn’t mean that the news application teams at NPR, The Guardian, ProPublica or the New York Times aren’t setting the pace for data journalism when it comes to cutting edge work — far from it — but the tools and techniques to make something worthwhile are being democratized.

That’s possible in no small part because of the trend toward open source tools and social coding I’m seeing online, from Open Street Map to more open elections.

It’s a privilege to have a global network to tap into for knowledge and, in the best moments, wisdom. Thank you — and please keep the responses coming, whether you use email, Twitter or the phone. Your input is helping shape a report I’m developing that ties together our coverage of data journalism. Look for that to be published early in the new year.


Reposted bycheg00 cheg00

November 07 2012

Four short links: 8 November 2012

  1. Closely — new startup by Perry Evans (founder of MapQuest), giving businesses a simple app to track competitors’ online deals and social media activity. Seems a genius move to me: so many businesses flounder online, “I don’t know what to do!”, so giving them a birds-eye view of their competition turns the problem into “do better than them!”.
  2. The FT in Play (Reuters) — very interesting point in this analysis of the Financial Times being up for sale: [Traditional] journalism doesn’t have economies of scale. The bigger that journalistic organizations become, the less efficient they get. (via Bernard Hickey)
  3. Big Data Behind Obama’s Win (Time) — huge analytics operation, very secretive, providing insights and updates on everything.
  4. How to Predict the FutureThis is the story of a spreadsheet I’ve been keeping for almost twenty years. Thesis: hardware trends more useful for predicting advances than software trends. (via Kenton Kivestu)
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