Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

October 04 2013

❝Web App Source Code Protection Community Group The goal of this community group is to explore…

http://www.w3.org/community/webappscp

Web App Source Code Protection Community Group

The goal of this community group is to explore solutions for protecting web app source codes.
It is well-known that web page source codes are visible to the public due to the openness of the Internet and the W3C standards.
With the advent of HTML5, the web apps become popular, especially the mobile web apps. Web apps can be classified as either Hosted App or Packaged App. The source code of Packaged Apps (such as the apps in Firefox OS or Tizen OS) are installed and running locally. Users can easily view the source code. Similarly front end source code of Hosted App can also be easily seen by anyone.
In this case, the publicity of source codes becomes a problem. Because web developers never hope their web apps are easily copied by others.
Therefore, this group intends to find mechanisms of code protection for web apps, especially for packaged apps, making the source codes (e.g. HTML, CSS, JavaScript), as well as relevant resource files (image, audio and video, etc.) cannot be seen easily. Thus, the interests of web developers will be protected.

#foutage_de_gueule (désolé, mais là ...) #W3C #html5

August 21 2013

March 15 2013

February 22 2013

Four short links: 22 February 2013

  1. Indiepocalypse: Harlem Shake Edition (Andy Baio) — After four weeks topping the Billboard Hot 100, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’s “Thrift Shop” was replaced this week by Baauer’s “Harlem Shake,” the song that inspired the Internet meme.
  2. SplinterNetan Android app designed to create an unblockable Twitter like network that uses no cellular or Internet communications. All messages are transmitted over Bluetooth between users, creating a true peer-to-peer messaging system. All messages are anonymous to prevent retaliation by government authorities. (via Ushahidi)
  3. Disposable Satellites (Forbes) — tiny, near-disposable satellites for use in getting battlefield surveillance quickly [...] launched from a jet into orbit, and within a few minutes [...] provide soldiers on the ground with a zoomed-in, birds-eye view of the battlefield. Those image would be transmitted to current communications devices, and the company is working to develop a way to transmit them to smartphones, as well.
  4. Native iOS to HTML5 Porting Tool (Intel) — essentially a source-to-source translator that can handle a number of conversions from Objective-C into JavaScript/HTML5 including the translation of APIs calls. A number of open source projects are used as foundation for the conversion including a modified version of Clang front-end, LayerD framework and jQuery Mobile for widgets rendering in the translated source code. A porting aid, not a complete translator but a lot of the dog work is done. Requires one convert to Microsoft tools, however. (via Kevin Marks)

November 28 2012

Four short links: 28 November 2012

  1. Moral Machinesit will no longer be optional for machines to have ethical systems. Your car is speeding along a bridge at fifty miles per hour when errant school bus carrying forty innocent children crosses its path. Should your car swerve, possibly risking the life of its owner (you), in order to save the children, or keep going, putting all forty kids at risk? If the decision must be made in milliseconds, the computer will have to make the call. (via BoingBoing)
  2. Hystrixa latency and fault tolerance library designed to isolate points of access to remote systems, services and 3rd party libraries, stop cascading failure and enable resilience in complex distributed systems where failure is inevitable. More information. (via Tom Loosemore)
  3. Offline First: A Better HTML5 Experience — can’t emphasize how important it is to have offline functionality for the parts of the world that don’t have blanket 3G/LTE/etc coverage. (280 south from SF, for example).
  4. Disaster of Biblical Proportions (Business Insider) — impressive collection of graphs and data showing commodity prices indicate our species is living beyond its means.

October 12 2012

Four short links: 12 October 2012

  1. Code Talks and Designers Don’t Speak the Language (Crystal Beasley) — Many of the bugs, however, require a deep understanding of why the product exists in the marketplace and a thorough understanding of the research that underpins the project. These strategic questions are analogous to what a software architect would do. I was on the Persona project full time for three months before I felt confident making significant choices about UX.
  2. Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge: systematic review of randomised controlled trials (British Medical Journal) — you don’t need to subscribe to appreciate this.
  3. html5test — see how the browsers stack up in features and compliance.
  4. Backbone FundamentalsA creative-commons book on Backbone.js for beginners and advanced users alike.

June 01 2012

Publishing News: HMTL5 may be winning the war against apps

Here are a few stories that caught my attention in the publishing space this week:

The shortest link between content and revenue may be HTML5

HTML5 LogoA couple weeks ago, MIT Technology Review's editor in chief and publisher Jason Pontin wrote a piece about killing their app and optimizing their website for all devices with HTML5. That same week, Lonely Planet's Jani Patokallio predicted that HTML5 would nudge out the various ebook formats. This week, Wired publisher Howard Mittman shot back in an interview with Jeff John Roberts at PaidContent, insisting that apps are the future, not HTML5.

Roberts reports that "[Mittman] believes that HTML5 will just be part of a 'larger app experience' in which an app is a storefront or gateway for readers to have deeper interactions with publishing brands." I'm not sure, however, that readers need yet another gateway (read: obstacle) to their content, and recent movements in the publishing industry suggest HTML5 may be the more likely way forward.

This week, Inkling founder and CEO Matt MacInnis announced the launch of Inkling for Web, an HTML5-based web client that brings Inkling's iPad app features to any device with a browser. The app and HTML5 technology in this case are intertwined — all content previously owned in the app can now also be accessed via the web, and activity will sync between the app and the web, so notes made on the web will appear in the iPad app and vice versa. MacInnis says in the announcement that the launch is a big part of the company's overall vision to provide service to anyone on any device they choose, one of the major benefits of choosing HTML5 technology.

Also this week, OverDrive announced plans to launch OverDrive Read, an open standard HTML5/EPUB browser-based ebook platform that will allow users to read ebooks online or offline, without having to install software or download an app. Dianna Dilworth at GalleyCat reports on additional benefits for publishers: "Using the platform, publishers can create a URL for each title. This link can include book previews and review copies, as well as browsing capabilities and sample chapters."

In the end, it will all come down to what it always comes down to: money. Roger McNamee's latest piece, "HTML 5: The Next Big Thing for Content," takes a very thorough look at HTML5 in general and specifically in relation to content publishing (this week's must-read). As to money, this excerpt stood out:

"The beauty of these new [HTML5] 'app' models is that each can [be] monetized, in most cases at rates better than the current web standard. Imagine you are reading David Pogue's technology product review column in the New York Times. Today, the advertising on that page is pretty random. In HTML 5, it will be possible for ads to search the page they are on for relevant content. This would allow the Times to auction the ad space to companies that sell consumer electronics, whose ads could then look at the page, identify the products and then offer them in the ad."

As it becomes more and more likely that ads will be incorporated as a revenue stream in ebooks, publishers will embrace whatever technology draws the shortest line and the most avenues between content and revenue, which at this point is looking more and more like HTML5.

The future of publishing has a busy schedule.
Stay up to date with Tools of Change for Publishing events, publications, research and resources. Visit us at oreilly.com/toc.

MIT students present news reporting solutions

MIT Media Lab students were busy this week presenting final projects for their "News in the Age of Participatory Media" class. Andrew Phelps at Nieman Journalism Lab highlighted a few of the interesting projects, which were required to address a new tool, technique, or technology for reporting the news. One student proposed modernizing the hyperlink by attaching semantic meaning to it; another suggested a Wiki-like idea for correlations to put impossibly big numbers — the $15 trillion U.S. national debt, for instance — into context for readers.

The growing importance of data journalism makes another student's suite of tools called DBTruck particularly interesting. As Phelps explains, users can "[e]nter the URL of a CSV file, JSON data, or an HTML table and DBTruck will clean up the data and import it to a local database." The tools also let you compare arbitrary data to provoke deeper insights — in testing, the student discovered a correlation between low birth weights and New York state communities with high teen pregnancy rates, a connection that might not have been otherwise discovered.

Penguin and Macmillan deny participation in an illegal conspiracy

Publishers Penguin and Macmillan responded this week to the Department of Justice's (DOJ) antitrust lawsuit filed earlier this year against the two publishers and Apple (Apple responded to the lawsuit last week).

The New York Times reports that in Penguin's 74-page response (PDF), it "called Amazon 'predatory' and a 'monopolist' that treats books as 'widgets.' It asserted that Amazon, not Penguin, was the company engaging in anticompetitive behavior, to the detriment of the industry."

Laura Hazard Owen called Macmillan's 26-page response (PDF) "shorter and more fiery" than Penguin's. She reports:

"'Macmillan did not participate in any illegal conspiracy,' Macmillan's filing says, and 'the lack of direct evidence of conspiracy cited in the Government's Complaint is telling…[it is] necessarily based entirely on the little circumstantial evidence it was able to locate during its extensive investigation, on which it piles innuendo on top of innuendo, stretches facts and implies actions that did not occur and which Macmillan denies unequivocally.'"

Related:

May 22 2012

Four short links: 22 May 2012

  1. New Zealand Government Budget App -- when the NZ budget is announced, it'll go live on iOS and Android apps. Tablet users get details, mobile users get talking points and speeches. Half-political, but an interesting approach to reaching out to voters with political actions.
  2. Health Care Data Dump (Washington Post) -- 5B health insurance claims (attempted anonymized) to be released. Researchers will be able to access that data, largely using it to probe a critical question: What makes health care so expensive?
  3. Perl 5.16.0 Out -- two epic things here: 590k lines of changes, and announcement quote from Auden. Auden is my favourite poet, Perl my favourite programming language.
  4. WYSIHTML5 (GitHub) -- wysihtml5 is an open source rich text editor based on HTML5 technology and the progressive-enhancement approach. It uses a sophisticated security concept and aims to generate fully valid HTML5 markup by preventing unmaintainable tag soups and inline styles.

May 18 2012

Why I haven't caught ereader fever

iPad 2 illustrationO'Reilly GM and publisher Joe Wikert (@jwikert) wrote recently about how he can't shake his ereader. I read his story with interest, as I can't seem to justify buying one. I was gifted a second-generation Kindle a while back, and it lived down to all my low expectations. The limitations were primarily the clumsy navigation and single-purpose functionality. I loaned it to a friend; she fell in love, so my Kindle found a new home.

At this point, I do all my ereading on my iPad 2: books, textbooks, magazines, news, short form, long form ... all of it. I will admit, I found the new Nook Simple Touch with GlowLight that Wikert acquired somewhat tempting. The technology is much improved over the second generation Kindle, and though I haven't yet played with one in the store, I bet the execution is much more enjoyable. Still, my original hang-ups prevail.

First, I don't want to be locked in to one retailer. On my iPad, I have apps that allow me to read books bought from anywhere I choose. I can buy books from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple and other smaller retailers, and they will all work on my iPad. True, this spreads my library around in a less-than-ideal organization, but the ability to buy books from anywhere is more important to me.

Also, I'm not so sure ebooks and ereaders will have a place down the road, making the value proposition of the investment that much less appealing. Much like the music journey from records to MP3s, digital reading technology is advancing, and perhaps at a much faster pace than its music counterpart. Jani Patokallio, publishing platform architect at Lonely Planet, recently predicted the obsolescence of ebooks and ereaders within five years, suggesting the web and HTML5 will become the global format for content delivery and consumption. And publications such as the Financial Times and MIT's Technology Review already are dropping their iOS and Android apps in favor of the web and HTML5.

I doubt my iPad will become obsolete any time soon. I look forward to the day books are URLs (or something similar) and we can read them anywhere on any device — and that day may not be too far off. I think I'm so attached to the iPad experience because it simulates this freedom to the best of its ability.

Ereader shortcomings also are likely to present a rich content hindrance, even before a shift to a web/HTML5 format gets underway. In a separate blog post, Wikert talked about a baseball book that missed its opportunity by not curating video links. He wrote: "The video links I'm talking about would have been useless on either device [his Kindle or Nook], but if they were integrated with the ebook I would have gladly read it with the Kindle app on my tablet." As publishers start realizing content opportunities afforded by digital, I think my iPad will serve me better than a single-purpose ereader.

Another hang-up I have, and this is likely to do with my general aversion to change, is the form factor. Most ereaders are somewhere around mass-market-paperback size, and the Nook Simple Touch and Simple Touch with GlowLight are nearly square. I prefer hardcover or trade paperback size — about the size and shape of my iPad. I might be able to get past this particular issue, but given the others I've mentioned, I just can't justify trying.

I will have to surrender to Wikert on the battery life and weight points — the one thing I really liked about the Kindle was its feather-light weight and the fact that during its short stay with me, I never had to charge the battery. I expect the surrender to be temporary, however. I have faith in our engineering friends — two years ago, a research team at MIT was using carbon nanotubes to improve the battery-power-to-weight ratio ... I can't imagine it will be too much longer before life catches up to research. In the meantime, I expect to remain happily connected at the hip to my iPad.

The future of publishing has a busy schedule.
Stay up to date with Tools of Change for Publishing events, publications, research and resources. Visit us at oreilly.com/toc.

Related:


May 10 2012

O'Reilly Radar Show 5/10/12: The surprising rise of JavaScript

Below you'll find the script and associated links from the May 10, 2012 episode of O'Reilly Radar. An archive of past shows is available through O'Reilly Media's YouTube channel and you can subscribe to episodes of O’Reilly Radar via iTunes.


The Radar interview

JavaScript’s ascendance has caught many people by surprise. Fluent Conference co-chair Peter Cooper explains why and how it happened in this episode of O’Reilly Radar [interview begins 12 seconds in].

Radar posts of note

Here’s a look at some of the top stories recently published across O’Reilly [segment begins at 11:58].

First up, Mike Hendrickson has published his annual five-part analysis of the computer book market. "State of the Computer Book Market" is a must-read for publishers and developers alike. The full report is also available as a free ebook. Read the series.

In a recent interview with Etsy's Mike Brittain we learned that a failure in secondary content doesn't need to take down an entire website. Brittain explains how to build resilience into UIs and allow for graceful failures. Read the post.

Finally, in our piece "Big data in Europe" Big Data Week organizers Stewart Townsend and Carlos Somohano share the distinctions and opportunities of Europe's data scene. Read the post.

As always, links to these stories and other resources mentioned during this episode are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Radar video spotlight

During a recent podcast interview, Velocity Conference chair Steve Souders described himself as an "optimization nut." Find out what that means — and discover how to stay on top of the latest web ops and performance techniques — in this episode’s video spotlight [segment begins at 13:04].

Here are the web operations and performance resources Steve Souders mentions during the video spotlight segment:


Closing

All of the links and resources noted during this episode — including those mentioned by Steve Souders in the previous segment — are available at radar.oreilly.com/show.

Also, you can always catch episodes of O’Reilly Radar at youtube.com/oreillymedia and subscribe to episodes through iTunes.

That’s all we have for now. Thanks for joining us and we’ll see you again soon.

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

May 04 2012

Publishing News: Nook gets Microsoft, and soon NFC

Here are a few stories from the publishing space that caught my eye this week.

Microsoft enters the battle of the publishing tech giants

NookLogo.pngAfter hinting in January that something might be in the works for the Nook, a deal between Microsoft and Barnes & Noble was announced this week. Reuters reports:

"Microsoft Corp will invest $300 million in Barnes & Noble Inc's digital and college businesses ... Microsoft will get a 17.6 percent stake in the new unit, while Barnes & Noble will own about 82.4 percent ... The business, whose name has not yet been decided, will have an ongoing relationship with Barnes & Noble's retail stores."

Much discussion is flurrying about.

Felix Salmon has an interesting analysis at Wired, writing that "the news does mean that Barnes & Noble won't need to constantly find enormous amounts of money to keep up in the arms race with Amazon. That's largely Microsoft's job, now." He also points out that the real winners here are readers: "... we finally have a real three-way fight on our hands in the e-book space, between three giants of tech: Apple, Amazon, and Microsoft. And that can only be good for consumers."

Publisher Thad McIlroy offers an initial analysis of the deal, likening the "marriage" to "two losers stumbling to the altar without bridesmaids or witnesses," and a subsequent in-depth look at just what the $300 million exchange means to both sides:

"I know that Microsoft gained in part because the press release states that the two companies 'settled their patent litigation.' To merely settle patent litigation gives you no idea of who the winner is; the settlement can take myriad forms.

However, the sentence in the press release continues, 'moving forward, Barnes & Noble and Newco will have a royalty-bearing license under Microsoft's patents.' That means Barnes & Noble has agreed to pay Microsoft for some or all of its previously disputed patents via this new company (currently called 'Newco'). And that means Microsoft managed to gain the upper hand in these negotiations." [Link added.]

Microsoft analyst Mary Jo Foley over at ZDNet took a look at what the partnership could mean for future devices: a Windows-powered e-reader, perhaps? She reports that during a press/analyst call, "[Microsoft President Andy Lees] mentioned a few times that Microsoft is positioning Windows as key to the future of reading."

O'Reilly GM and publisher Joe Wikert argues this isn't about ebooks at all, suggesting that "Microsoft should instead use this as an opportunity to create an end-to-end consumer experience that rivals Apple's and has the advertising income potential to make Google jealous." He also wonders if Microsoft might influence B&N to deeply discount Nook prices with a two-year content purchase requirement, similar to what the company just did with the Xbox.

In any case, it looks like Wikert's wish for an end-to-end UX might already be in the works. In an interview about the Microsoft deal at CNN Fortune, Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch says plans are underway to improve offline-online integration to bring a richer experience to customers:

"We're going to start embedding NFC chips into our Nooks. We can work with the publishers so they would ship a copy of each hardcover with an NFC chip embedded with all the editorial reviews they can get on BN.com. And if you had your Nook, you can walk up to any of our pictures, any our aisles, any of our bestseller lists, and just touch the book, and get information on that physical book on your Nook and have some frictionless purchase experience. That's coming, and we could lead in that area."

In response to whether NFC functionality will roll out this year, Lynch said, "Maybe ..."

The future of publishing has a busy schedule.
Stay up to date with Tools of Change for Publishing events, publications, research and resources. Visit us at oreilly.com/toc.

Amazon loses shelf space

Target decided this week that it would cease carrying the Kindle and its accessories. The Verge reports that "the company is going to stop carrying the line of products due to a 'conflict of interest'" and that "[c]ertain accessories will remain in stock, but shipments of Kindles themselves will cease as of May 13th." Exactly why this decision was made remains a bit unclear, though speculations are being bandied about.

The LA Times quotes a Target spokeswoman with the official benign company line: "Target continually evaluates its product assortment to deliver the best quality and prices for our guests," but then points to a New York Times story with a much more telling tidbit:

"'What we aren't willing to do is let online-only retailers use our brick-and-mortar stores as a showroom for their products and undercut our prices,' Target executives wrote in a letter to vendors, asking them to think of new pricing and inventory strategies, according to a note that Deborah Weinswig, a Citi analyst, sent to clients."

Laura Hazard Owen at GigaOm covers a couple possible reasons for Kindle eviction. Given the note quoted in the New York Times, the most likely seems to be that Amazon tried to negotiate new terms that Target just couldn't accept, or vice versa. Owen notes a couple of other important points to consider: Target will continue carrying other brands of ereaders and accessories, including the Nook, and that Apple is set to begin a mini-store test program with Target.

Also notable: Thus far, I haven't seen Amazon comment on the situation.

Is the end of ereaders and ebooks nigh?

The battle for King of the Ereaders may soon come to an end — not because one of tech giants wins the war, but because ebook formats lose out to the web and HTML5. So argues Jani Patokallio, publishing platform architect at Lonely Planet, in a blog post.

He says it all boils down to publishing rights and publishers opting "to circle wagons, stick their fingers in their ears and pretend digital is print." He argues that "in the print publishing industry, publishing rights for different countries and languages are both standard practice and a big deal," but these same agreements don't make sense for digital publishing. They are, in fact, hindering the customers' ability to purchase and read books:

"Customers today are expected to buy into a format that locks down their content into a silo, limits their purchasing choices based on where their credit card happens to have been registered, is designed to work best on devices that are rapidly becoming obsolete, and support only a tiny subset of the functionality available on any modern website. Nonetheless, publishers are seeing their e-book sales skyrocket and congratulating themselves on a job well done."

Patokallio says that "[o]n the Web, the very idea that the right to read a website would vary from country to country seems patently absurd," and that ebooks have an obvious replacement:

"The same medium that already killed off the encyclopedia, the telephone directory and the atlas: the Web. For your regular linear fiction novel, or even readable tomes of non-fiction, a no-frills PDF does the job just fine and Lonely Planet has been selling its travel guidebooks and phrasebooks a chapter at a time, no DRM or other silliness, as PDFs for years now. For more complicated, interactive, Web-like stuff, throw away the artificial shackles of ePub and embrace the full scope of HTML5, already supported by all major browsers and usable right now by several billion people."

Patokallio's post is a must-read, and there were a couple indications this week that he might be on to something. First, "[t]he Financial Times is preparing to kill off its iPad and iPhone app for good, signalling its final conversion from executable-app to web-app publishing." Second, in a post at Wired regarding the Microsoft deal with B&N, Felix Salmon says: "... over the long term, we're not going to be buying Kindles or Nooks to read books. Just as people stopped buying cameras because they're now just part of their phones, eventually people will just read books on their mobile device, whether it's running Windows or iOS or something else."

Related:


April 30 2012

Mobile web development isn't slowing down

We're all well aware that mobile web development has gone through a complete metamorphosis over the last five years. We went from tiny screens with limited browsers to elegant multitouch displays with advanced web experiences. But even if you look at a shorter timeline — two years or so — you'll see that major improvements in mobile web development are still in progress. This space continues to produce exponential shifts.

In the following interview, "Programming the Mobile Web" author and Fluent Conference speaker Maximiliano Firtman (@firt) discusses some of mobile development's short-term leaps. He also looks at where mobile's envelope pushers will take us next.

At this point, what are the essential mobile development skills?

Maximiliano FirtmanMaximiliano Firtman: It depends on if we are targeting native or mobile web development, but usually an understanding of the mobile space is important. There are many differences between devices, so developers need up-to-date information on operating systems, versions, browsers, screen sizes, screen densities, multitouch, etc. That's why mobile usability and high-performance coding techniques are a must.

Related to that, what are the key mobile development tools?

Maximiliano Firtman: Emulators and simulators, while not perfect, are essential tools. Tools that debug and quickly deploy apps to real devices are also important. And the devices themselves are important for measuring performance and testing hardware-related features, such as touch, the accelerometer, GPS accuracy and even color palettes.

The first edition of your book, "Programming the Mobile Web," came out in July 2010. What are the major changes you've tracked in mobile web development since then?

Maximiliano Firtman: Since 2010, we've finally deprecated some old technologies such as WML and even XHTML MP. Today, HTML5 is king, while in 2010 we were talking about Apple or Webkit extensions.

In addition, the mobile web is no longer just for mobile websites. We can now also develop native web apps and even ebooks with EPUB 3. So, the platform is growing.

The tablet market was just starting two years ago, and now we have several vendors and operating systems. We also have new problems to deal with, such as screen density, performance optimization and even 3-D screens.

These days, we have a new vocabulary with responsive web design and responsive web design + server-side components (RESS). We also have lots of new APIs on the JavaScript side, new hardware APIs (motion sensors, battery, camera), and new mobile browsers (Google Chrome, Firefox, Amazon Silk).

Finally, we've seen the creation of a number of frameworks and debugging tools, including jQuery Mobile, Adobe Shadow and even iWebInspector — a free tool I've created for iOS web debugging.

What do you see happening at the edge of mobile web development?

Maximiliano Firtman: We are seeing browsers pushing boundaries, such as the live camera API inside WebRTC on Opera Mobile, Web Notifications and WebGL on BlackBerry PlayBook, and the Battery API on Firefox for Android.

Examples of envelope-pushing web apps include the Financial Times app, which has a great touch UI and offline access, and the Boston Globe website, which is a good example of responsive web design and RESS.

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

This interview was edited and condensed.

Related:

April 12 2012

Christopher Schmitt and Simon St. Laurent discuss HTML5


Are we entering a new revolution on the web? HTML5 author and conference organizer Christopher Schmitt sat down to talk with O'Reilly editor Simon St. Laurent about why it's a great time to be a web developer. The new HTML5 spec has brought back the conversation about the web. Developers have been hacking the web for the last several years, and now those techniques have been pulled out of the hands of the developers and into the browser for better, faster websites. Let's hope we see continued innovation in the coming years to strengthen the ecosystem and personal connections.

Highlights from the full video interview include:

  • HTML5 and friends. HTML5 is often thought of a collection of technologies released at the same time, even though they aren't all technically "HTML5". [Discussed at the 0:39 mark]
  • The open web has won. Frameworks have given developers a way to create and share advances across browsers. [Discussed at the 03:29 mark]
  • Relieving your headaches. Native video and audio reduce the number of tasks needed to get media content on the web. [Discussed at the 05:20 mark]
  • Hybrid skills. Web developers need to understand code, design, and UI/UX to thrive in this evolving world. [Discussed at the 11:50 mark]
  • Design friendly CSS. Despite all the focus on HTML5 and JavaScript, CSS is growing ever more powerful and important. [Discussed at the 14:23 mark]
  • Accessible PDFs. PDFs are part of the mix, even if they follow a different track. [Discussed at the 23:46 mark]

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

Ebook formats and the allure of customer lock-in

Sanders Kleinfeld (@sandersk), author of "HTML5 for Publishers" and publishing technologies specialist at O'Reilly, recently sat down with me to talk about ebook formats, challenges publishers face accommodating the formats and how HTML5 might change the game. With all the various ebook formats and platforms requiring multiple publishing outputs becoming something of a hindrance to workflows, I asked if he thought we'd ever see a universal format. He said he worries that vendors won't be willing to give up customer lock-in:

"I'm really optimistic, and I really hope so. I think that's what they're striving for with the EPUB3 standard, which is based around all these open technologies — HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript ... What's disappointing right now is that Amazon is very set on their Mobi format for their Kindle device, Apple has made strides away from EPUB 3 with their latest iBooks 2.0 and iBooks Author ... I think vendors that make these devices are interested in maintaining that lock-in for customers. That's a challenge the industry faces — trying to push things back toward open standards, which I think is best for everyone." (Discussed at 2:43.)

He also said a lot of what's behind DRM is about achieving customer lock-in and that vendors might be obstacles in that regard as well. (Discussed at 4:21.)

You can view our entire interview in the following video:

TOC Latin America — Being held April 20, TOC Latin America will focus on standards, global digital publishing trends, case studies of innovative publishers in Latin America, consumer habits, and much more.

Register to attend TOC Latin America

Related:


April 05 2012

Editorial Radar with Mike Loukides & Mike Hendrickson

Mike Loukides and Mike Hendrickson, two of O'Reilly Media's editors, sat down recently to talk about what's on their editorial radars. Mike and Mike have almost 50 years of combined technical book publishing experience and I always enjoy listening to their insight.

In this session, they discuss what they see in the tech space including:

  • How 3D Printing and personal manufacturing will revolutionize the way business is conducted in the U.S. [Discussed at the 00:43 mark ]
  • The rise of mobile and device sensors and how intelligence will be added to all sorts of devices. [Discussed at the 02:15 mark ]
  • Clear winners in today's code space: JavaScript. With Node.js, D3, HTML5, JavaScript is stepping up the plate. [Discussed at the 04:12 mark ]
  • A discussion on the best first language to teach programming and how we need to provide learners with instruction for the things they want to do. [Discussed at the 06:03 mark ]

You can view the entire interview in the following video.

Next month, Mike and Mike will be talking about functional languages.

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

February 29 2012

Four short links: 29 February 2012

  1. StuxNet Deep Dive -- extremely technical talk, but this page has a redux. The presenter's thesis, well-argued, is that StuxNet was absolutely aimed specifically at the Natanz facility. (via Chris Douglas)
  2. Smithsonian Digitizing Items (CNet) -- two-person project, only able to do a few items a year, but still an excellent advance. See also Bronwyn Holloway-Smith's art project around artifact replicas.
  3. Collusion (Mozilla) -- have your browser tell you the third parties tracking your web browsing. (via Hacker News)
  4. Survivor (Github) -- HTML5 implementation of an Atari/C64 game. If you wanted to learn how to write HTML5 arcade games, you could do worse than study this project. (via Andy Baio)

January 27 2012

ValoBox wants to reward content creators and consumers

Earlier this year, I chatted with Anna Lewis (@anna_cn) and Oliver Brooks (@cn_oli) about their new startup, ValoBox — a platform that allows readers to consume books by the page, chunk, or as a whole. The duo has been hard at work through the summer and fall, and ValoBox has launched. I got in touch with Brooks to see how the platform and development have progressed. Our interview follows.

How has ValoBox evolved since our interview in May?

OliverBrooks.pngOliver Brooks: The product has stayed laser focused on keeping things light and simple. It has gone through a lot of tweaks to the user interface and system, to boil it down as much as possible.

ValoBox is really comprised of two applications, the publishing system and the ValoBox reader.

The changes to the publishing system have focused on ease of integration use and quality of output. The system can now create a ValoBox book automatically from an ONIX and EPUB file feed. A lot of effort has gone into making sure the content is presented perfectly, even when split into small, purchasable sections. We've also built a system similar to Google Analytics for books, which provides the publisher with information for each book, such as where on the web is best for selling books (Twitter feeds, blogs, etc.) and details about how each book is used.

In our earlier interview you discussed a "premium layer for the web." Is that still guiding your efforts?

Oliver Brooks: Absolutely. We believe books are just the start of our game — we see ValoBox as suitable for premium articles, audio, video, and even web pages. We think premium content should integrate with the web rather than be a separate ecosystem.

The existing book reader interface will be one of many portals into premium content. We have designs for interfaces that don't intrude on the design of a website at all. When you want to buy something, you will see ValoBox branding and have an easy way to purchase the content. As almost everyone is always signed into a system of some kind — be it Twitter, Facebook or Google — our vision is that you can always access premium content with just a click.

How does ValoBox work?

Oliver Brooks: It's an HTML5 application that runs inside any modern web browser. This means you can access it from any website, on any device wherever you are. Content is stored in the cloud and streamed securely from our servers on demand. A future enhancement will mean you won't even have to be online to read books you have read before; they'll automatically be stored on your device for later.

TOC NY 2012 — O'Reilly's TOC Conference, being held Feb. 13-15, 2012, in New York, is where the publishing and tech industries converge. Practitioners and executives from both camps will share what they've learned and join together to navigate publishing's ongoing transformation.

Register to attend TOC 2012

How does ValoBox help readers?

Oliver Brooks: The core benefit is accessibility to premium content. ValoBox lets you access an entire catalog, and you can choose which pages you want and buy them for cents at a time.

So, you might see a book reviewed on your favorite blog or hear about an interesting topic from a Twitter feed. A couple of clicks and cents later, you can be reading what they are talking about. We think it's ridiculous that books are locked behind lengthy and expensive checkout and download processes, and then require special applications to read when videos and audio are available with a click.

Another huge bonus is our social retail system. If you like what you read and think you know someone else who would like it, you can share it with an embed or a link. Anything that is bought from your share will earn you a 25% cut.

How does it help authors and publishers?

Oliver Brooks: Authors will have an awesome tool for promoting their books. Books can be integrated with their websites and social media promotions, providing the tip of the pyramid leading to many other shares and embeds. All the activity is tracked in real time to give an unparalleled level of knowledge about where books perform best. Don't forget that if an author sells the books, they will not only get their royalty but also the 25% ValoBox social retail cut.

As for publishers, they get a great way to empower their readership to create new and sustainable sales channels. Imagine thousands of innovative readers finding the right places for books inside their personal and professional networks. No traditional retailer could dream of going into places such as a university e-learning environment or a team management wiki, or of garnering sales from inside a full-scale social network. Just like authors, publishers have real-time, detailed analytics of how each book is being bought. They also have a view of how all of their books are read across the entire web.

I like to think of ValoBox as a way to realize the value of creating a symbiotic relationship between the content creation and consumption communities, rewarding each one for their efforts appropriately.

This interview was edited and condensed.

Related:

January 23 2012

Children's ebooks and apps are big business on the iPad

This post is part of the TOC podcast series. You can also subscribe to the free TOC podcast through iTunes.


If you look at the top paid products in the "Books" category of the iTunes App store, you'll typically see that children's products dominate the list. Children's books and apps are big business on the iPad. This will, of course, be a core focus of next month's TOC Bologna. I thought it would be nice to preview that event by talking about the state of the market in this podcast interview with Neal Hoskins (@utzy), founder of WingedChariot.

Key points from the full video interview (below) include:

  • Formats and size are a challenge for this content — Even though mobile devices are getting smaller, the current iPad screen size is smaller than the print edition of many children's books, leaving the print version as a more inviting option. [Discussed at the 1:52 mark.]
  • EPUB vs. App? — Publishers face the same dilemma here as they do in other genres. Am I better off simply porting content from print to an EPUB edition, or should I invest in custom app development, native to a particular platform? [Discussed at 6:02.]
  • Languages and multi-lingual layers — Digital platforms represent an enormous opportunity for WingedChariot to extend the multi-lingual reach of their products. One of their recent apps, My House, is a great example of how the user can easily switch between French and English through the touch of a button. [Discussed at 12:50.]
  • Nothing beats hands-on research — WingedChariot has done extensive research with children on what they like about devices, apps, etc. They've also published much of this research. Sample videos are here and here. [Discussed at 14:50.]
  • Three platforms for the mid-term future — Neal sees three companies/platforms vying for the future of this market: Google, Apple and ... Microsoft. It's interesting that he doesn't include Amazon in this list although Google is, of course, the platform behind the Amazon Kindle Fire. [Discussed at 17:50.]

You can view the entire interview in the following video.


Want to hear more about the children's book marketplace? Be sure to register now for TOC Bologna, which takes place on March 18th.

TOC NY 2012 — O'Reilly's TOC Conference, being held Feb. 13-15, 2012, in New York City, is where the publishing and tech industries converge. Practitioners and executives from both camps will share what they've learned and join together to navigate publishing's ongoing transformation.

Register to attend TOC 2012

Related:


Responsive design works for websites, why not for digital comic books?

In a keynote speech at the Books in Browsers conference, Pablo Defendini (@pablod), the interactive producer at Open Road Media, discussed responsive comics and the opportunities digital tools afford comic book design. In print, Defendini says, the page is the canvas for comics, but instead of being optimized for online consumption, digital editions are often merely static adaptations of print comics. How much richer could the reading experience be if they were designed with more responsive techniques?

Defendini says it's important for writers and artists to consider the various digital formats and take full advantage of the possibilities. Highlights from his keynote (below) include:

  • Screen resolution is an issue for comics, and current mechanisms used to compensate can be detrimental to the story. [Discussed at the 2:05 mark.]
  • Web designers experience similar presentation issues on different devices of varying screen sizes and employ responsive design techniques as a solution. What if we did that with comics? [Discussed at 3:54.]
  • Defendini shows examples of a comic designed with HTML and CSS — "just a website by another name" — displayed on smartphone and tablet screens, and in iBooks as a fixed layout book. [Starting at about 5:00.]
  • Starting at about 10:34, Defendini addresses questions about designing the speech balloons in CSS, motion comics, and solutions for multi-language comics.

View the keynote in full below.

TOC NY 2012 — O'Reilly's TOC Conference, being held Feb. 13-15, 2012, in New York, is where the publishing and tech industries converge. Practitioners and executives from both camps will share what they've learned and join together to navigate publishing's ongoing transformation.

Register to attend TOC 2012

Related:


January 05 2012

Developer Week in Review: 2012 preview edition

Baby New Year has opened his eyes, and he sees a bright future for the developer community. Of course, newborn babies can't focus beyond a few inches, so I'd take that with a grain of salt. Some of us are a little longer in the tooth, so this week, I'll try to peer out into the months ahead and take my best guess as to what we can expect in 2012. You can come back in December and laugh hysterically at my predictions.

It's all about the mobile

Let's get the obvious out of the way first. The intellectual property litigation mayhem that we saw in 2011 will continue unabated in the new year. Now that several vendors have implemented the nuclear option by suing their competitors, the fun and games can only get more intense as companies use local judicial systems and trade organizations as a way to keep competing products out of markets.

On the Android front, Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) is starting to show up on handsets, but depressingly few if you're an Android developer hoping to use the new features of the release. There's no word if there will be a follow-on to ICS anytime soon, which is probably a good thing, given how far behind handset makers are in getting recent releases onto their shipping products.

Fans of iOS can look forward to at least one new iPhone and iPad (if not more) in 2012, as well as iOS 6. We'll probably see the end-of-life for the iPhone 3 family since only the 3GS made it onto the iOS 5 supported list, and another year will have past. Rumors abound that there will be an integrated TV option for iOS as well — whether it will allow apps to be installed is a question mark at the moment. Siri on your TV could be fairly awesome; imagine just saying, "Record all new Patriots games" and having it happen.

The BlackBerry appears to be singing its swan song while those pesky P2ME feature phones continue to own much of the low-end cell phone market. The biggest unknown this year is if the Windows Phone platform will finally gain significant traction. Nokia and Microsoft are spending a boatload of money to promote it. They have the resources to buy market share if they want, and recent reviews of new Windows Phone devices have actually been pretty positive. The question would be, who would Microsoft steal market share from — Apple, Android or the low-end phones?

Strata 2012 — The 2012 Strata Conference, being held Feb. 28-March 1 in Santa Clara, Calif., will offer three full days of hands-on data training and information-rich sessions. Strata brings together the people, tools, and technologies you need to make data work.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

Clouds are gathering on the horizon

Much as the Internet rapidly gained mindshare in the early '90s, the cloud has now become the hot new concept that the general public grasps, at least in principle. What exactly the cloud is tends to depend on who you talk to, but the general idea of moving desktop applications to HTML5-based web applications is a done deal at this point.

The one big wrench in the plan could come from the legislative branches of the world. The more they pass SOPA-like laws, the more people are going to worry about how easily they could lose access to their private data if they move it to the cloud. It was bad enough when you had to trust Google not to be evil; expecting elected representatives to be evil is almost a given.

The increasing move to the cloud is only going to heat up demand for developers who know HTML5, jQuery, PHP, and other web-based technologies. At least in the short run, it's going to be a good time to be a web developer.

Offshoring loses its cachet

The stampede to move development jobs overseas seems to have encountered a roadblock, and many U.S. companies appear to be rethinking the economics of outsourcing projects. Some startups are trying new and innovative (and potentially insane) schemes to work around U.S. labor laws, and while this is unlikely to bring back the go-go days of the late '90s — when developers were courted like rock stars — it may perhaps stem the hemorrhaging of skilled jobs overseas. The challenge for the U.S. will be to produce enough high-tech workers to fill all those returning jobs, especially as more and more high school students rethink the economics of going to college.

Got news?

Please send tips and leads here.

Related:

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl