Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

May 10 2012

Understanding Mojito

Yahoo's Mojito is a different kind of framework: all JavaScript, but running on both the client and the server. Code can run on the server, or on the client, depending on how the framework is tuned. It shook my web architecture assumptions by moving well beyond the convenience of a single language, taking advantage of that approach to process code where it seems most efficient. Programming this way will make it much easier to bridge the gap between developing code and running it efficiently.

I talked with Yahoo architect fellow and VP Bruno Fernandez-Ruiz (@olympum) about the possibilities Node opened and Mojito exploits.

Highlights from the full video interview include:

  • "The browser loses the chrome." Web applications no longer always look like they've come from the Web. [Discussed at the 02:11 mark]
  • Basic "Hello World" in Mojito. How do you get started? [Discussed at the 05:05 mark]
  • Exposing web services through YQL. Yahoo Query Language lets you work with web services without sweating the details. [Discussed at the 07:56 mark]
  • Manhattan, a closed Platform as a Service. If you want a more complete hosting option for your Mojito applications, take a look. [Discussed at the 10:29 mark]
  • Code should flow among devices. All of these devices speak HTML and JavaScript. Can we help them talk with each other? [Discussed at the 11:50 mark]

You can view the entire conversation in the following video:

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20


Related:


April 12 2012

Christopher Schmitt and Simon St. Laurent discuss HTML5


Are we entering a new revolution on the web? HTML5 author and conference organizer Christopher Schmitt sat down to talk with O'Reilly editor Simon St. Laurent about why it's a great time to be a web developer. The new HTML5 spec has brought back the conversation about the web. Developers have been hacking the web for the last several years, and now those techniques have been pulled out of the hands of the developers and into the browser for better, faster websites. Let's hope we see continued innovation in the coming years to strengthen the ecosystem and personal connections.

Highlights from the full video interview include:

  • HTML5 and friends. HTML5 is often thought of a collection of technologies released at the same time, even though they aren't all technically "HTML5". [Discussed at the 0:39 mark]
  • The open web has won. Frameworks have given developers a way to create and share advances across browsers. [Discussed at the 03:29 mark]
  • Relieving your headaches. Native video and audio reduce the number of tasks needed to get media content on the web. [Discussed at the 05:20 mark]
  • Hybrid skills. Web developers need to understand code, design, and UI/UX to thrive in this evolving world. [Discussed at the 11:50 mark]
  • Design friendly CSS. Despite all the focus on HTML5 and JavaScript, CSS is growing ever more powerful and important. [Discussed at the 14:23 mark]
  • Accessible PDFs. PDFs are part of the mix, even if they follow a different track. [Discussed at the 23:46 mark]

Fluent Conference: JavaScript & Beyond — Explore the changing worlds of JavaScript & HTML5 at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference (May 29 - 31 in San Francisco, Calif.).

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR20

July 04 2011

Four short links: 4 July 2011

  1. Let There Be Smite (Pippin Barr) -- simple diversion for the 4th of July. It won't be easy for God to save America. (via Pippin's blog)
  2. Basel Wear -- to answer the question I know was burning on your lips: "what *did* the Swiss wear in 1634?" Impressively detailed pictures from a 1634 book that is now online. One of the reasons I'm in favour of digitizing cultural collections is that we're more likely to encounter them on the net and so ask questions like "how did people dress in 1634?", "why did everyone carry keys?", and "what is a Sexton?"
  3. databranches: Using git as a Database -- it's important to approach your design for using git as a database from the perspective of automated merging. Get the merging right and the rest will follow. I've chosen to use the simplest possible merge, the union merge: When merging parent trees A and B, the result will have all files that are in either A or B, and files present in both will have their lines merged (and possibly reordered or uniqed).
  4. Joshfire -- open source (dual-licensed GPLv2 and commercial) multiplatform development framework built on HTML5.

July 07 2010

Four short links: 7 July 2010

  1. The Way I Work: Justin Kan of JustinTV (Inc Magazine) -- I admit it, I had written Justin off as "that irritating guy who went around with a camera on all the time" but it turns out he's quite thoughtful about what he does. I try to keep the meetings small, especially when we're doing product design. If you have eight people in the design meeting, it doesn't work. Everybody has an opinion. Everyone wants to weigh in on what the font should look like. The end product becomes the average of eight opinions. You don't get excellent work, just average. (via Hacker News)
  2. Rhodes -- open source cross-platform smartphone app development framework, with offline sync and hosted data storage.
  3. How Transparency Fails and Works Too (Clay Johnson) -- another thoughtful piece reflecting the general awakening that "being transparent" is a verb not a noun: you don't "achieve transparency", but rather you have a set of actors, actions, and objects inside and outside government that provide the checks and balances we hope to get from transparency. It's a complex system, requiring way more than just "release the data and they will come". [L]et’s not fool ourselves into thinking though that just because a system has real-time, online disclosure that somehow the system will be cleaned up. It won’t. Data makes watchdogging possible, sure, but more data makes watchdogging harder. Plus, for the transparency solution to work, people have to actually care enough to watchdog. Imagine that your city council, facing terrible obesity rates, decided to enact and enforce a mandatory nudity law to improve its public health. Policy wonks got together and decided that in order to get people to lose weight, they’d outlaw clothing. People went outside naked, and sure, it was a little uncomfortable at first, but basically— the fat people stayed fat, and the thin people stayed thin. The town was more comfortable just averting their collective eyes.
  4. Meta-Optimize -- a StackOverflow-like q&a site for data geeks who groove to topics like "unsupervised methods for word polarity detection". (via Flowing Data)

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl