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January 30 2014

Four short links: 30 January 2014

  1. $200k of Spaceships Destroyed (The Verge) — More than 2,200 of the game’s players, members of EVE’s largest alliances, came together to shoot each other out of the sky. The resultant damage was valued at more than $200,000 of real-world money. [...] Already, the battle has had an impact on the economics and politics of EVE’s universe: as both side scramble to rearm and rebuild, the price of in-game resource tritanium is starting to rise. “This sort of conflict,” Coker said, “is what science fiction warned us about.”
  2. Google Now Has an AI Ethics Committee (HufPo) — sorry for the HufPo link. One of the requirements of the DeepMind acquisition was that Google agreed to create an AI safety and ethics review board to ensure this technology is developed safely. Page’s First Law of Robotics: A robot may not block an advertisement, nor through inaction, allow an advertisement to come to harm.
  3. Academic Torrentsa scalable, secure, and fault-tolerant repository for data, with blazing fast download speeds built on BitTorrent.
  4. Hack Schools Meet California Regulators (Venturebeat) — turns out vocational training is a regulated profession. Regulation meets disruption, annihilate in burst of press releases.

November 20 2013

Four short links: 20 November 2013

  1. Innovation and the Coming Shape of Social Transformation (Techonomy) — great interview with Tim O’Reilly and Max Levchin. in electronics and in our devices, we’re getting more and more a sense of how to fix things, where they break. And yet as a culture, what we have chosen to do is to make those devices more disposable, not last forever. And why do you think it will be different with people? To me one of the real risks is, yes, we get this technology of life extension, and it’s reserved for a very few, very rich people, and everybody else becomes more disposable.
  2. Attending a Conference via a Telepresence Robot (IEEE) — interesting idea, and I look forward to giving it a try. The mark of success for the idea, alas, is two bots facing each other having a conversation.
  3. Drone Imagery for OpenStreetMap — 100 acres of 4cm/pixel imagery, in less than an hour.
  4. LG Smart TV Phones Home with Shows and Played Files — welcome to the Internet of Manufacturer Malware.

August 06 2013

Le patron d'Amazon rachète le « Washington Post »

Le patron d’Amazon rachète le "Washington Post"
http://www.lemonde.fr/actualite-medias/article/2013/08/05/le-patron-d-amazon-rachete-le-washington-post_3457822_3236.html

Le groupe #Washington_Post a annoncé, lundi 5 août, la cession de ses activités d’édition, dont le quotidien portant son nom, au patron-fondateur du groupe de distribution en ligne #Amazon, #Jeff_Bezos, pour 250 millions de dollars. « L’acheteur est une entité qui appartient à M. Bezos en tant qu’individu, et pas Amazon Inc », précise le communiqué du groupe.

Et pas que le quotidien : http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2013/08/05/bezos_bought_a_bit_more_than_the_post.html

Quel #management va s’imposer dans ce groupe de #presse ? Des hypothèses là : #disruption
http://qz.com/112073/how-things-are-about-to-change-at-the-washington-post-now-that-jeff-bezos-is-in-
http://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/e-ink-mobius.jpg

Jeff le #libertarien se veut rassurant :
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/jeff-bezos-on-post-purchase/2013/08/05/e5b293de-fe0d-11e2-9711-3708310f6f4d_story.html

I won’t be leading The Washington Post day-to-day.

Je m’attendais pas à celle-là ce matin... http://seenthis.net/messages/162928

L’occasion de lire :

En Amazonie. Infiltré dans le « meilleur des mondes »
http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2013/08/RIMBERT/49581

En plus je viens de voir Le capital de Costa-Gavras (oui le truc avec Gad Elmaleh) où ça cause de #hft et de grands enfants qui jouent qui jouent jusqu’à ce que ça pète... alors je vous dis pas l’état dans lequel ça me met.

Quant à Gorge Profonde, on attend encore sa réaction.

C’est quand même marrant que le parangon du #journalisme d’#investigation soit racheté par un des maîtres des #bigdata marchandes. En ces temps de persécution des #whistleblowers. Vivement la fusion Publicis / Omnicom !

July 17 2013

❝Nous avons besoin de chemins désirables et praticables❞ LaTraverse3_Bolobolo.html - Les…

Nous avons besoin de chemins désirables et praticables

LaTraverse3_Bolobolo.html - Les renseignements généreux
http://www.les-renseignements-genereux.org/fichiers/15297#sdfootnote2anc

sortir d’un imaginaire dépressif et apocalyptique : « Plus nous aurons une idée claire de ce que nous voulons, moins nous aurons peur du chaos du ’’lendemain’’, et plus nous nous sentirons encouragés à la résistance constructive ».


via @intempestive http://seenthis.net/messages/135515 et le tag #technocratie

#disruption du #fascisme dans un monde sans #idées (contre #impuissance) - #utopie (contre #apocalypse) http://seenthis.net/messages/155454

http://www.lyber-eclat.net/couv/bolo_couv150.jpg
http://www.lyber-eclat.net/lyber/bolo/bolo.html

ou plutôt #dysruption (grec)

Préface : La mort lente de l’économie (1998)

Introduction

Une terrible gueule de bois

La Machine-Travail planétaire

Les trois éléments de la machine

Les trois deals en crise
Deal A . Deal B . Deal C

La fin du réalisme politique

La seconde réalité

BOLO’BOLO n’est pas moral

Substruction

Dysco
A) Dysinformation
B) Dysproduction
C) Dysruption

Trico

Calendrier provisoire
http://www.lyber-eclat.net/lyber/bolo/images/urbain_suisse360.gif

April 19 2013

Four short links: 19 April 2013

  1. Bruce Sterling on DisruptionIf more computation, and more networking, was going to make the world prosperous, we’d be living in a prosperous world. And we’re not. Obviously we’re living in a Depression. Slow first 25% but then it takes fire and burns with the heat of a thousand Sun Microsystems flaming out. You must read this now.
  2. The Matasano Crypto Challenges (Maciej Ceglowski) — To my delight, though, I was able to get through the entire sequence. It took diligence, coffee, and a lot of graph paper, but the problems were tractable. And having completed them, I’ve become convinced that anyone whose job it is to run a production website should try them, particularly if you have no experience with application security. Since the challenges aren’t really documented anywhere, I wanted to describe what they’re like in the hopes of persuading busy people to take the plunge.
  3. Tachyona fault tolerant distributed file system enabling reliable file sharing at memory-speed across cluster frameworks, such as Spark and MapReduce. Berkeley-licensed open source.
  4. Jammit (GitHub) — an industrial strength asset packaging library for Rails, providing both the CSS and JavaScript concatenation and compression that you’d expect, as well as YUI Compressor, Closure Compiler, and UglifyJS compatibility, ahead-of-time gzipping, built-in JavaScript template support, and optional Data-URI / MHTML image and font embedding. (via Joseph Misiti)

April 03 2013

November 30 2012

To eat or be eaten?

One of Marc Andreessen’s many accomplishments was the seminal essay “Why Software is Eating the World.” In it, the creator of Mosaic and Netscape argues for his investment thesis: everything is becoming software. Music and movies led the way, Skype makes the phone company obsolete, and even companies like Fedex and Walmart are all about software: their core competitive advantage isn’t driving trucks or hiring part-time employees, it’s the software they’ve developed for managing their logistics.

I’m not going to argue (much) with Marc, because he’s mostly right. But I’ve also been wondering why, when I look at the software world, I get bored fairly quickly. Yeah, yeah, another language that compiles to the JVM. Yeah, yeah, the Javascript framework of the day. Yeah, yeah, another new component in the Hadoop ecosystem. Seen it. Been there. Done that. In the past 20 years, haven’t we gained more than the ability to use sophisticated JavaScript to display ads based on a real-time prediction of the user’s next purchase?

When I look at what excites me, I see a much bigger world than just software. I’ve already argued that biology is in the process of exploding, and the biological revolution could be even bigger than the computer revolution. I’m increasingly interested in hardware and gadgetry, which I used to ignore almost completely. And we’re following the “Internet of Things” (and in particular, the “Internet of Very Big Things”) very closely. I’m not saying that software is irrelevant or uninteresting. I firmly believe that software will be a component of every (well, almost every) important new technology. But what grabs me these days isn’t software as a thing in itself, but software as a component of some larger system. The software may be what makes it work, but it’s not about the software.

A dozen or so years ago, people were talking about Internet-enabled refrigerators, a trend which (perhaps fortunately) never caught on. But it led to an interesting exercise: thinking of the dumbest device in your home, and imagine what could happen if it was intelligent and network-enabled. My furnace, for example: shortly after buying our house, we had the furnace repairman over 7 times during the month of November. And rather than waiting for me to notice that the house was getting cold at 2AM, it would have been nice for a “smart furnace” to notify the repairman, say “I’m broken, and here’s what’s probably wrong.” (The Nest doesn’t do that, but with a software update it probably could.)

The combination of low-cost, small-footprint computing (the BeagleBone, Raspberry Pi, and the Arduino), along with simple manufacturing (3D printing and CNC machines), and inexpensive sensors (for $150, the Kinect packages a set of sensors that until recently would easily have cost $10,000) means that it’s possible to build smart devices that are much smaller and more capable than anything we could have built back when we were talking about smart refrigerators. We’ve seen Internet-enabled scales, robotic vacuum cleaners, and more is on the way.

At the other end of the scale, GE’s “Unleashing the Industrial Internet” event had a fully instrumented network-capable jet engine on stage, with dozens of sensors delivering realtime data about the engine’s performance. That data can be used for everything from performance optimization to detecting problems. In a panel, Tim O’Reilly asked Matt Reilly of Accenture “do you want more Silicon Valley on your turf?” and his immediate reply was “absolutely.”

Even in biology: synthetic biology is basically nothing more than programming with DNA, using a programming language that we don’t yet understand and for which there is still no “definitive guide.” We’re only beginning to get to the point where we can reliably program and build “living software,” but we are certainly going to get there. And the consequences will be profound, as George Church has pointed out.

I’m not convinced that software is going to eat everything. I don’t see us living in a completely virtual world, mediated completely by browsers and dashboards. But I do see everything eating software: software will be a component of everything we do or buy, from our clothing to our food. Why is the FitBit a separate device? Why not integrate it into your shoes? Can we imagine cookies that incorporate proteins that have been engineered to become unappealing when we’ve eaten too much? Yes, we can, though we may not be happy about that. Seriously, I’ve had discussions about genetically engineered food that would diagnose diseases and turn different colors in your digestive track to indicate cancer and other conditions. (You can guess how you read the results).

Andreessen is certainly right in his fundamental argument that software has disrupted, and will continue to disrupt, just about every industry on the planet. He pointed to health care and education as the next industries to be disrupted; and we’re certainly seeing that, with Coursera and Udacity in education, and conferences like StrataRx in health care. We just need to push his conclusion farther. Is a robotic car a case of software eating the driver, or of the automobile eating software? You tell me. At the Industrial Internet event, Andreessen was quoted as saying “We only invest in hardware/software hybrids that would collapse if you pulled the software out.” Is an autonomous car something that would collapse if you pulled the software out? The car is still drivable. In any case, my “what’s the dumbest device in the house” exercise is way too limiting. When are we going to build something that we can’t now imagine, that isn’t simply an upgrade of what we already have? What would it mean for our walls and floors, or our plumbing, to be intelligent? At the other extreme, when will we build devices where we don’t even notice that they’ve “eaten” software? Again, Matt Reilly: “It will be about flights that are on time, luggage that doesn’t get lost.”

In the last few months, I’ve seen a number of articles on the future of venture investment. Some argue that it’s too easy and inexpensive to look for “the next Netscape,” and as a consequence, big ambitious projects are being starved. It’s hard for me to accept that. Yes, there’s a certain amount of herd thinking in venture capital, but investors also know that when everyone is doing the same thing, they aren’t going to make any money. Fred Wilson has argued that momentum is moving from consumer Internet to enterprise software, certainly a market that is ripe for disruption. But as much as I’d like to see Oracle disrupted, that still isn’t ambitious enough.

Innovation will find the funds that it needs (and it isn’t supposed to be easy). With both SpaceX and Tesla Motors, Elon Musk has proven that it’s possible for the right entrepreneur to take insane risks and make headway. Of course, neither has “succeeded,” in the sense of a lucrative IPO or buyout. That’s not the point either, since being an entrepreneur is all about risking failure. Neither SpaceX nor Tesla are Facebook-like “consumer web” startups, nor even enterprise software startups or education startups. They’re not “software” at all, though they’ve both certainly eaten a lot of software to get where they are. And that leads to the most important question:

What’s the next big thing that’s going to eat software?

Related:

October 26 2011

We're in the midst of a restructuring of the publishing universe (don't panic)

A new book released this week called "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto," by Hugh McGuire (@hughmcguire) and Brian O'Leary (@brianoleary), examines the future of book publishing from an advanced perspective. Beyond pricing and delivery mechanisms, beyond taking print and displaying it on a screen, the authors look at the digital transformation as more than a change in format — as stated in the book's introduction:

The move to digital is not just a format shift, but a fundamental restructuring of the universe of publishing. This restructuring will touch every part of a publishing enterprise — or at least most publishing enterprises. Shifting to digital formats is 'part one' of this changing universe; 'part two' is what happens once everything is digital. This is the big, exciting unknown.

I reached out to the book's co-author Hugh McGuire to examine some of the elements at play in the future of publishing and in the "exciting unknown" of doing things with books that have never before been possible. Our interview follows.

What's the story behind "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto"?

HughMcGuire.jpgHugh McGuire: I'd been working on building PressBooks.com — a digital book production tool designed for publishers — and I wanted to get a real sense of how it worked, hands on. How better than to manage a real publishing project, working with a real publisher, from beginning to end, using PressBooks?

Of course, it made sense to make it a book about the future of books and publishing. So much ink is spilled about that topic, but we wanted to get away from the abstract and right down to the nitty-gritty. We wanted to produce something that would be a handbook you could give to someone starting a publishing house today.

I talked to my friend Brian O'Leary about co-editing with me, and he was on board. With that, I pitched it to Joe Wikert at O'Reilly — he loved the idea, and off we went.

It's been a bit of a challenge, producing a book while simultaneously building the book production tool on which the book is produced, but we've managed ... if a month or two late.

This is a broad question, but what are the major ways digital is changing publishing?

Hugh McGuire: It's more like in what ways isn't digital changing publishing? First, we very quickly dispatched of the pre-Kindle, pre-iPad question of, "Will people read books on screens?" Yes, and the growth curves are spectacular. The publishing world has, in a pretty orderly way, adapted to this change — with digital files now slotting alongside print books in the distribution chain. I think is this just the start, however.

The publishing world has managed the "digital-conversion disruption" pretty well. Publishers make ebooks now as a matter of course, and consumers buy them and read them on a multitude of devices.

What we as an industry haven't managed yet is the "digital-native disruption." What happens when all new books are ebooks, and the majority of books are read on digital devices, most of which are connected to the Internet? This brings with it so many new expectations from consumers, and I think this is where the real disruption in the market will come.

The kinds of disruption there include: speed of the publishing process, reader engagement with content, linking in and out of books, layers of context added to books, and the webification of books. I think the transitions we've seen in the past three years will pale in comparison to what's going to happen to publishing in the next three years.

Book: A Futurist's Manifesto — Through this collection of essays from publishing thought leaders and practitioners, you'll become familiar with a wide range of developments occurring in the wake of the digital book shakeup.

Which digital tools should publishers focus on?

Hugh McGuire: Publishing is such a strange, conservative business, and I think there is a real hesitancy to invest heavily early on until there is real clarity on what the long-term standards will be. But EPUB is based on HTML, and I think whatever happens, HTML will be with us for the long haul.

So, tools I think publishers need to start working with:

These are the keys to having a successful publishing company that is future-proofed as best as it can be.

Why is metadata important to digital publishing?

Hugh McGuire: Physical bookstores provide a range of crucial services beyond being a place where you can buy books. Stores offer selection, curation, and recommendation. The digital book retail world is very different because it offers nearly unlimited selection. While retailers like Amazon spend a fair bit of energy trying to recommend titles to readers, the task of sifting through and finding books is increasingly left to consumers.

So, having good metadata — which really should be renamed "information about a book" so it's less intimidating — means providing information that will: A) ensure that people looking for your book, or for the kind of content in your book, will find it; and B) help potential buyers of your book decide they want to buy it.

On the web, companies spend lots of time making sure their sites are search engine optimized, so that people looking for those websites (or the information on them) will find them. Attaching good metadata to a book is much like search engine optimization — it's the mechanism you use to make sure your book gets found by the people looking for it.

What will the publishing landscape look like in five years?

Hugh McGuire: In five years:

  • Print is a marginal part of the trade business.
  • There's a huge increase in the number of small publishers of all stripes.
  • There's a massive increase in the number of books on the market.
  • The Big Six publishers will consolidate to become the Big Two or Three.
  • Most writers will continue to have a hard time making a living as writers.
  • Good/successful publishers will be those that provide good APIs to their books.
  • All books will be expected to be connected to the web, allowing linking in and out, and contextual layers of commentary, etc. (Will this be driven by publishers or retailers? To date, retailers have lead the way.)
  • The distinction between what you can do with an ebook and what you can do with a website will disappear (and it will seem strange that it ever existed).
  • While books will become more webby, the web will also become more bookish, accommodating more book-like structures in evolving HTML standards.

What's the publishing schedule for "Book: A Futurist's Manifesto"?

Hugh McGuire: The book comes in three parts:

  1. Out now: "Part 1: The Setup" — This addresses what's happening right now in publishing.
  2. Out sometime before Christmas: "Part 2: The Outlook: What Is Next for the Book?" — Given the technology we currently have, what can we expect to see happening with books going forward?
  3. Out in early 2012: "Part 3: The Things We Can Do with Books: Projects from the Bleeding Edge" — Case studies of real publishing projects, technologies, and enterprises working right now at the bleeding edge.

This interview was edited and condensed.

Related:

September 16 2011

Top Stories: September 12-16, 2011

Here's a look at the top stories published across O'Reilly sites this week.

Building data science teams
A data science team needs people with the right skills and perspectives, and it also requires strong tools, processes, and interaction between the team and the rest of the company.

The evolution of data products
The real changes in our lives will come from products that have the richness of data without calling attention to the data.

The work of data journalism: Find, clean, analyze, create ... repeat
Simon Rogers discusses the grunt work and tools behind The Guardian's data stories.

Social data: A better way to track TV
PeopleBrowsr CEO Jodee Rich says social data offers a better way to see what TV audiences watch and what they care about.


When media rebooted, it brought marketing with it
In this TOC podcast, Twist Image president Mitch Joel talks about some of the common challenges facing the music, magazine and book publishing sectors.




Strata Conference New York 2011, being held Sept. 22-23, covers the latest and best tools and technologies for data science — from gathering, cleaning, analyzing, and storing data to communicating data intelligence effectively. Save 30% on registration with the code ORM30.

December 21 2010

The 2010 technology of the year is ...

While Facebook and the iPad garnered considerable attention this year -- and rightly so -- it is the free micro-blogging service Twitter that gets my 2010 accolade for the most important technology product of the year.

Now with more than 175 million subscribers, an estimated dollar value that is double that of the New York Times, and 25 billion tweets this year alone, Twitter is becoming a formidable disrupter in multiple domains, including media and the enterprise.

In June of this year, responding to several of my friends and colleagues who were simply confounded by the merit of Twitter, I posted my first blog on the topic. Looking back now, six months later, I see that even I significantly underestimated the value of the service.

Twitter

Why Twitter?

Twitter finally meets the two essential criteria for business success:

1. Is there a viable revenue model?

To that I say a resounding yes! This year, Twitter began the rollout of their suite of promotion features. A form of advertising, Twitter promotions call out sponsored hashtags and help to serve up associated tweets. As Evan Williams (Twitter co-founder) pointed out at the Web 2.0 Summit in November, a considerable challenge right now is managing the excessive demand by brands to have their products and services promoted. He also pointed out that there are many more ways to monetize Twitter that are in the works.

2. Does the service have sustainable utility for its users?

Once again, Twitter has proven this to be the case over and over again. I'll spend the remainder of this post exploring this point.

Twitter as a communications tool

There are few websites or TV commercials now that don't adorn themselves with the Facebook and Twitter logos. These services are quickly becoming the new destinations or originating points for people interested in learning more about products and services. Twitter, with its small footprint and timeliness advantage, has the ability to uniquely reach and drive sales to a global audience. For a broader set of marketers such as politicians, governments, entertainers, charities, media outlets, and non-governmental agencies, the service provides a new and valuable channel to spread a message.

I personally use Twitter to communicate my ideas and to highlight items of interest to my followers. I also enjoy reading tweets from those I follow that are both informative and entertaining (side note: like many of you, I've completely dropped the use of RSS for pushed content as a result of Twitter). It's also a knowledge discovery tool for me (more on that later below).

The usage of Twitter during the Iranian presidential protests in 2009 hints at the promise of a frictionless channel that rides above the limits of traditional communication tools.

Twitter as a disrupter of existing media

If you've had the chance to play with Flipboard for the iPad, it's clear to see that pulling in a Twitter stream illuminates the real-time zeitgeist in ways never possible before. It presents person-specific interests and provides options for content, such as video that you can be explored further if desired.

Too often we take an existing media and simply present the same content in a different digital context. Great innovation uses digitization for reinvention. For example, we shouldn't simply bring TV to the Internet; it should be different and use the unique capabilities of digitization to make it even more compelling. In Twitter, for example, the ability to serve up news in small chunks from a plethora of pundits results in the reinvention of news distribution. That's neat.

Twitter as a competitor to Facebook and Google

The September facelift of Twitter on the web, which included inline video and photographs, was suggestive of what may lie ahead. Rather than being limited to basic micro-blogging capability, the revised Twitter is a compelling place to share media and send and receive direct messages. Improved mobile accessibility and usability extend these capabilities beyond the desktop, too.

Twitter has become a destination to discover and find things. Some of that is by push (e.g. you follow a link someone shared), but increasingly it offers benefits in pull (e.g. you do a search for something). While the demise of Google search is not imminent, Twitter is a search paradigm disrupter that can't be ignored.

Twitter is natively a social network. It easily connects people and interests. Once again, while not a Facebook killer yet, a few additional features would align it against the core value-propositions of Facebook, but in a decidedly -- and potentially -- more compelling manner.

One can easily deduce why both Google and Facebook have been vying to acquire Twitter.


Of course it's not all perfect. Twitter has a lot of work to do. They continue to have service outage issues when utilization spikes. A symptom of success no doubt, but an excuse that is long past its free-pass status. In the same interview cited earlier, Evan Williams spoke about the need -- which they are working on -- to have more meaningful or relevant tweets somehow rise above other less valuable content. One survey found that 40 percent of tweets are "pointless babble." That's a lot of noise if you're trying to get real value from the service.

Fundamentally Twitter is important because it takes traditional concepts such as marketing and messaging and forces us to rethink them. Its API enables powerful data analysis of trends and discovery of patterns. It has spawned an ecosystem of more than 300,000 integrated apps that extend its capabilities. It's even sparked a healthy amount of copycats, both in the consumer space (e.g. Ident.ca and Plurk), and in the enterprise (e.g. Yammer and Socialcast).

I recognize Twitter as my 2010 technology product of the year for many of the reasons above, but specifically it is because of its potential. If the company makes a few smart decisions over the next few months and beyond, Twitter has the power to be profoundly important in many areas of our lives.



Related:




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