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August 19 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Anonymous is not unanimous - Pastebin.com - 2011-08-17



Anonymous is not Unanimous.


Anonymous has a perception problem. Most people think we're a group of shadowy hackers. This is a fundamental flaw. Anonymous is *groups* of shadowy hackers, and herein lies the problem. Anonymous has done a lot of good in just the past 9 months. It has helped with other groups in providing aid to people on the ground in countries where "democracy" is a bad word.

The mainstream media needs to understand that Anonymous isn't unanimous. I've yet to see wide scale reporting make this distinction. A destructive minority is getting a majority of the press, while those of us who toil in the shadow doing good work for people at home and abroad go unthanked.

BART protestors didn't spring up out of thin air this week. Protests against BART have been ongoing for years. Where's the media coverage? If the media paid more attention to peaceful protests and general social unrest, I think hackers would be far less inclined to do things such as leaking data just to get the attention of the press.

Finally, hacking isn't just about breaking into web servers and leaking data to the public. Far from it. Hacking is just as much about breaking out of things as it is about breaking into things. Hacking is lifestyle, and a mindset. It is about learning more about the technologies we use and social norms we are subject to.

Don't let the actions of a few skew your perception of hackers as a whole.

@AnonyOps
Reposted bykrekk krekk

August 17 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Hacktivism's Global Reach, From Targeting Scientology to Backing WikiLeaks and the Arab Spring - Democracy Now 2011-08-17


20110816_button3

In recent years, online hackers who identified as being part of Anonymous and other groups have carried out dozens of high-profile online operations. When MasterCard and Visa suspended payments to WikiLeaks last December, hackers with Anonymous briefly took down the websites of both credit card giants. Other targets have included Sony, PayPal, Amazon, Bank of America, the Church of Scientology, and the governments of Egypt, Tunisia and Syria. Now law enforcement agencies across the world have begun cracking down on the hackers. In July, 16 suspected members of Anonymous were arrested in the United States. We take an inside look at how online hacker activist groups operate with three guests: Peter Fein, an activist who works with the group Telecomix, a volunteer organization that has supported free speech and an open internet in the Middle East, and who sometimes acts as a liaison to Anonymous and was one of several moderators on the Internet Relay Chat for OpBART, the latest Anonymous campaign targeting the San Francisco subway system; Gabriella Coleman, an assistant professor of media, culture and communication at New York University whose first book, "Coding Freedom: The Aesthetics and the Ethics of Hacking," is forthcoming, currently working on a new book about Anonymous and digital activism; and a member of the hacktivist group Anonymous, going by the pseudonym "X." [includes rush transcript]

02mydafsoup-01

Disguised Member of Hacktivist Group "Anonymous" Defends Retaliatory Action Against BART - Democracy Now 2011-08-17


On Monday, officials with the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) were forced to close four train stations during the evening rush hour as free speech advocates attempted to disrupt the evening commute. The protest was called by the activist hacker group Anonymous in retaliation for BART’s decision to shut down cell phone and mobile-internet service at four stations last week in an effort to disrupt a protest over the shooting of a homeless man. As part of its self-described "OpBART" campaign, Anonymous hacked into the BART website, myBart.org, and leaked the names, phone numbers and passwords of train passengers. We’re joined by a disguised Anonymous member who took part in "OpBART," speaking under the pseudonym "X." "We gave them a little taste of their own medicine," X says. "We’re information activists just trying to make our world a bit freer and a little better." On the question about the FBI investigation over the hack, X says: "I don’t want to get caught… I am literally running from coffeehouse to coffeehouse, from city to city, from state to state, to try to avoid this massive, multimillion-dollar manhunt that they’ve put out for Anonymous. And for what? What have we done, Amy? Point to one thing where we’ve hurt a single human being… BART...kills its innocent people… How dare they do this in the United States of America?" [includes rush transcript]

July 31 2011

02mydafsoup-01
FreedomBox v Facebook - Eben Moglen on Vimeo


Eben Moglen talks about the perils of the centralisation of data and the way to regain control of our internet. A condenced version of his 2010 Open World Forum talk.
freedomboxfoundation.org/​
kickstarter.com/​projects/​721744279/​push-the-freedombox-foundation-from-0-to-60-in-30
Reposted byRKcheg00

April 15 2011

We dismiss Wikileaks at our intellectual peril | Antony Loewenstein 2011-04-13

In a new interview with Assange published in India’s The Hindu, the Wikileaks founder discusses the world that exists away from the embedded media mindset:

There is a basic structure to geopolitics, which is not often mentioned. One way to think about it is that every country that is not very isolated has to sign up to one provider of intelligence or another. And there are a number of providers in the market. The U.S. is the market leader. And then you have really Russia and China and the U.K. providing a little bit. If you don’t sign up to one of these, then you can’t see what’s happening around you in your borders — because you don’t have geo-spatial intelligence. Information about individuals who may be coming into your territory or conspiring, you do not have; and that’s something that military groups and intelligence groups in various countries want to have. It increases their relative power within their own nations.

That doesn’t mean the nation needs it but rather that, for Indian intelligence, they can, for example, tremendously increase their influence within India by being signed up to all that intelligence product that the United States produces. Similarly, the Indian military can increase its power by having all these relationships with the U.S. military. And those relationships are not just pushed by the U.S. military or by the U.S. intelligence services. Nowadays, most of the economic activity involving intelligence and military in the United States occurs in private companies.

So there’s a blurring out in the United States between what is part of government and what is part of private industry. And these private industry groups, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and so on, and many thousands of smaller companies, lobby and push the U.S. State Department, Congress, and other countries directly to sign up as part of this system — so they can get more power and influence within the United States and have a greater ability to suck money out of the U.S. tax base and out of the tax bases of other countries.

Permalink | Leave a comment  »

Reposted bywikileaks wikileaks

April 05 2011

02mydafsoup-01
@krekk, danke für das statistische VDS-Material - könntest Du nochmals die eingebetteten Links überprüfen. Beide sind nicht mehr gültig, bzw. "Berechnung, etc." verändert beim Repost den vorgegebenen Link relativ zur Soup-URL, ein Bug, der mir gegelegentlich bei Soup.io bereits unterkam.- Vielen Dank!

March 24 2011

02mydafsoup-01

[...]

What does this tell us about the current security model for web browsing? This instance highlights a few issues:

  • Too many entities have CA powers: As the SSL Observatory project helped demonstrate, there are thousands of entities in the world that have the ability to issue certificates. Some of these are trusted directly by browsers, and others inherit their authority. We don't even know who many of them are, because such delegation of authority -- either via "subordinate certificates" or via "reseller authorities" -- is not publicly disclosed. The more of these entities exist, the more vulnerabilities exist.
  • The current system does not limit damage: Any entity that can issue a certificate can issue a certificate for any domain in the world. That means that a vulnerability at one point is a vulnerability for all.
  • Governments are a threat: All the major web browsers currently trust many government agencies as Certificate Authorities. This often includes places like Tunisia, Turkey, UAE, and China, which some argue are jurisdictions hostile to free speech. Hardware products exist and are marketed explicitly for government surveillance via a "man in the middle" attack.
  • Comodo in particular has a bad track record with their RA program: The structure of "Reseller Authorities" has led to poor or nonexistant validation in the past, but Mozilla and the other browsers have so far refused to take any action to remove Comodo or put them on probation.
  • We need to step up efforts on a fix: Obviously the current state of affairs is not ideal. As Appelbaum notes, efforts like DANE, CAA, HASTLS, and Monkeysphere deserve our attention.

[Update: Jacob Appelbaum has posted his response to the Comodo announcement, criticizing some aspects of their response and the browsers.]

[Update: A few more details are revealed in this Comodo blog post, including the fact that "an attacker obtained the username and password of a Comodo Trusted Partner in Southern Europe."]

[...]

Web Browsers and Comodo Disclose A Successful Certificate Authority Attack, Perhaps From Iran | Freedom to Tinker 2011-03-23
02mydafsoup-01

[...]

The hacker, whose March 15 attack was traced to an IP address in Iran, compromised a partner account at the respected certificate authority Comodo Group, which he used to request eight SSL certificates for six domains: mail.google.com, www.google.com, login.yahoo.com, login.skype.com, addons.mozilla.org and login.live.com.

The certificates would have allowed the attacker to craft fake pages that would have been accepted by browsers as the legitimate websites. The certificates would have been most useful as part of an attack that redirected traffic intended for Skype, Google and Yahoo to a machine under the attacker’s control. Such an attack can range from small-scale Wi-Fi spoofing at a coffee shop all the way to global hijacking of internet routes.

At a minimum, the attacker would then be able to steal login credentials from anyone who entered a username and password into the fake page, or perform a “man in the middle” attack to eavesdrop on the user’s session.

[...]

Hack Obtains 9 Bogus Certificates for Prominent Websites; Traced to Iran | Threat Level | Wired.com 2011-03-23
Reposted byiranelectionkrekk
02mydafsoup-01

March 08 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Aufruf zum dritten "Welttag gegen Internetzensur" | heise online - 2011-03-07

 

Die Organisation "Reporter ohne Grenzen", die sich für Pressefreiheit einsetzt, ruft (PDF-Datei) für den 12. März zum dritten "Welttag gegen Internetzensur" auf. An dem Tag will die Organisation einen Bericht mit dem Titel "Feinde des Internets" veröffentlichen. Darin werden Staaten mit massiver Online-Überwachung benannt und ihre aktuelle Kontroll- und Zensurmaßnahmen im Web untersucht. Dabei sollen auch die jüngsten Ereignisse in Tunesien und Ägypten berücksichtigt sowie auf die Rolle des Internets bei den Protesten und der Verbreitung von Nachrichten eingegangen werden. Am Vorabend des Aktionstages will Reporter ohne Grenzen wieder einen Blogger, Online-Journalisten oder Cyber-Aktivisten für dessen Engagement für Meinungsfreiheit im Internet mit dem "Netizen-Preis" auszeichnen.

Mit dem Jahrestag will Reporter ohne Grenzen nach eigenen Angaben auf das "weltweit große Ausmaß der Internetzensur aufmerksam machen". In vielen Ländern habe das Internet neue Räume für den Austausch von Informationen geschaffen und sich so zu einer Kraft der Freiheit entwickelt. Immer mehr Regierungen reagierten darauf mit einer verschärften Online-Überwachung, um kritische Blogger, Online-Journalisten und Internetnutzer zum Schweigen zu bringen. Derzeit seien weltweit rund 120 Blogger und Online-Aktivisten in Haft, weil sie im Internet ihre Meinung frei geäußert haben.

  

via twitter

    

Reposted bykrekk krekk

March 03 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Anonymous: Open Letter To The World

We stand at a unique time in our history, the rise of the internet and computer technology have contributed to an unparalleled rate of prosperity for the First World.

We have created for ourselves and empire unlike any other, a global network of constant trade and communication, a new age of technological advancement. We have come a long way from our humble roots in the Industrial Revolution and the days of Manifest Destiny. We are now pioneers on new digital frontiers expanding our domain from the quantum world to the far reaches of space.

And yet, the empire faces a crisis, a global recession, growing poverty, rampant violence, corruption in politics, and threats to personal freedom. As it was before in other times of crisis, the old stories have begun to repeat themselves. The half truths, this time repeated nightly on cable news and echoed through a series of tubes onto the internet: the empire is strong, change is unwise, business as usual is the answer. In times of uncertainty there are those who seek to add to the confusion, to prey on our insecurities and fears. Those who would seek to keep us divided for their own gain. The pervasive strategy takes many very convincing forms: Liberals and Conservatives, Christians and Muslims, Black and White, Saved and sinner.

But something unexpected is happening. We have begun telling each other our own stories. Sharing our lives, our hopes, our dreams, our demons. Every second, day in day out, into all hours of the night the gritty details of life on this earth are streaming around the world. As we see the lives of others played out in our living rooms we are beginning to understand the consequences of our actions and the error of the old ways. We are questioning the old assumptions that we are made to consume not to create, that the world was made for our taking, that wars are inevitable, that poverty is unavoidable. As we learn more about our global community a fundamental truth has been rediscovered: We are not so different as we may seem. Every human has strengths, weaknesses, and deep emotions. We crave love, love laughter, fear being alone and dream for a better life.

You must create a better life.

You cannot sit on the couch watching television or playing video games, waiting for a revolution. You are the revolution. Every time you decide not to exercise your rights, every time you refuse to hear another view point, every time you ignore the world around you, every time you spend a dollar at a business that doesn’t pay a fair wage you are contributing to the oppression of the human body and the repression of the human mind. You have a choice, a choice to take the easy path, the familiar path, to walk willingly into your own submission. Or a choice get up, to go outside and talk to your neighbor, to come together in new forums to create lasting, meaningful change for the human race.

This is our challenge:

A peaceful revolution, a revolution of ideas, a revolution of creation. The twenty-first century enlightenment. A global movement to create a new age of tolerance and understanding, empathy and respect. An age of unfettered technological development. An age of sharing ideas and cooperation. An age of artistic and personal expression. We can choose to use new technology for radical positive change or let it be used against us. We can choose to keep the internet free, keep channels of communication open and dig new tunnels into those places where information is still guarded. Or we can let it all close in around us. As we move in to new digital worlds, we must acknowledge the need for honest information and free expression. We must fight to keep the internet open as a marketplace of ideas where all are seated as equals. We must defend our freedoms from those who would seek to control us. We must fight for those who do not yet have a voice. Keep telling your story. All must be heard.

[Reposted for Anonymous: We Are All Anonymous]

Reposted fromBohemian Bohemian
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