Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

February 08 2013

Distributed resilience with functional programming

Functional programming has a long and distinguished heritage of great work — that was only used by a small group of programmers. In a world dominated by individual computers running single processors, the extra cost of thinking functionally limited its appeal. Lately, as more projects require distributed systems that must always be available, functional programming approaches suddenly look a lot more appealing.

Steve Vinoski, an architect at Basho Technologies, has been working with distributed systems and complex projects for a long time, first as a tentative explorer and then leaping across to Erlang when it seemed right. Seventeen years as a columnist on C, C++, and functional languages have given him a unique viewpoint on how developers and companies are deciding whether and how to take the plunge.

Highlights from our recent interview include:

  • From CORBA/C++ to Erlang — “Every time I looked at it, it seemed to have an answer.” [Discussed at the 3:14 mark]
  • Everything old is new again — “Seeing people accidentally or by having to work through the problems, stumbling upon these old research papers and old ideas.” [7:20]
  • Erlang is not hugely fast — “It’s more for control, not for data streaming.” [16:58]
  • Webmachine — “[It's what you would get] If you took HTTP and made a flowchart of it … and then implement that flowchart.” [23:50]

  • Is Erlang syntax a barrier? [28:39]

Even if functional programming isn’t something you want to do now, keep an eye on it: there’s a lot more coming. There are many options besides Erlang, too!

You can view the entire conversation in the following video:

Related:

October 24 2011

02mydafsoup-01

j-node: the network of global corporate control - revisited | James Glattfelder - 2011-10-03

complex systems, vast amounts of data and self-organization...
We spend billions of dollars trying to understand the origins of the universe, while we still don't understand the conditions for a stable society, a functioning economy, or peace.
(D. Helbing quoted from here)

The upcoming publication The Network of Global Corporate Control has gained some attention in the news (sciencenews.org, newscientist.com) and the blogosphere (for instance, planetsave.com, physorg.com and johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com). Because some reactions have been particularly hostile, for instance Ms. Yves Smith from Naked Capitalism (see also our responses here and in their comment section), or have inspired the conspiracy theory camp, please let me recapitulate what our paper is and isn't and address some of the voiced concerns, in order to avoid misconceptions.

[...]

August 31 2011

"On Glocalization coming of Age" by Zygmunt Bauman

One is tempted to say: social inventions or re-inventions (as the newly invented/discovered possibility of restoring to the city square the ancient role of the agora on which rules and rulers were...


----------------------------------


[...]

Stripping the place of its importance means that no place can any longer consider its own plight and potency, fullness or void, dramas played in and spectators they attract, as its private mattes. Places may (and do) propose, but it is now the turn of the unknown/uncontrolled/intractable/unpredictable forces roaming in the “space of flows” to dispose. Initiatives are as before local, but their consequences are now global, staying stubbornly beyond the predicting/planning/steering powers of the initiative’s birthplace, or any other place for that matter. Once launched, they – just as the notorious “intelligent missiles” – are fully and truly on their own. They are also “hostages to fate” – though the fate to which they are nowadays hostages is composed and perpetually re-composed of the on-going rivalry between locally laid out and hastily paved landing strips for the ready-made copycat patterns… The extant map or extant rankings of the established airports are here of no importance. And similarly of no importance would be the extant composition of the global air-traffic authority, were such an institution in existence – which it is not – of which the pretenders to such a role learn currently the hard way.

[...]



Reposted from02myEcon-01 02myEcon-01

February 01 2011

Democratic technology and unintended consequences

I was struck by this photo that appeared Sunday in the New York Times. It shows a crowd of Egyptian protesters listening to a military announcement. Try to count the number of people in the crowd who do not have a mobile device recording the action.

Expanding people's ability to communicate — from printing press to telegraph to telephone to text messaging — is always a revolutionary act. Communications technologies do not create the conditions for civic action (the unrest in Egypt is due to longstanding political repression), but they can accelerate the entire process by:

  1. Dramatically expanding the number of people directly involved in gathering, distributing and consuming information.
  2. Allowing a positive feedback loop to develop where people see the effect of their actions in real-time, which simultaneously reinforces commitment and recruits more members into the cause.

We tend to think of these technologies as inherently democratic. But the rub in all of this is that while these technologies democratize communications, they tend to monopolize surveillance and control.

So while more of us are capable of holding an open, peer-to-peer discussion, we are doing so with the consent and under the watchful (or subpoena-able) eye of just a handful of corporations or governments. And when citizen calls-to-action conflict with government calls for quiet, the government holds more of the cards. Vodafone has shut down cell phone communications in Egypt, the Egyptian government has effectively shut down Internet communications, and there are now calls for Ham radio operators to lend assistance as Egypt is being pushed back down the communications ladder.

In the "rich world" our experience of technology is often Utopian and our forecasts of negative consequences are framed only through our experience of current circumstance; we simply can't imagine what it is like to live in a repressive government or believe that we will ever live under one. But the seemingly benign governments in which we reside are an historical contingency. If the past provides any lesson it is that governments will wax and wane in their concern for civil liberties and human rights. Yet our digital profile (purchase history, political and personal associations etc.) will remain. Through our participation in these technologies we are donating our data to a vast, indelible reservoir whose future utility is unknown to us.

I am actually optimistic about the future of the Internet as a medium to promote civil liberty, free expression, better government and corporate citizenship (if one can credibly use such a phrase). However, I don't think it happens on its own. The Internet needs an architecture (legal and physical) to achieve such ends. Paradoxically I believe it requires some form of regulation to maintain its dynamic, emergent and decentralized properties so that any government or corporation has a limited ability to act in a crisis to shut things down.

Is access to communications a fundamental human right? If so, should a corporation have the ability to abrogate that right at the request of a host government? As we watch the battle between the Egyptian government's attempts to throttle information flow (including how corporations defy or collaborate with these attempts) and the people's struggle to maintain access to communications, we are seeing the contours of a struggle that will exemplify the next decades of political and policy changes as we try to define the increasingly critical relationship between technology and civil liberties.

November 11 2010

02mydafsoup-01

NPD-BLOG.INFO » Blog Archive » Vorzeigeprojekte unter Generalverdacht

Am 09. November 2010 sollte in der Dresdener Frauenkirche der Sächsische Förderpreis für Demokratie verliehen werden. Damit werden Praxisbeispiele prämiert und innovative Ansätze unterstützt. So zumindest die Idee. Denn gleichzeitig werden die Nominierten offenbar unter Generalverdacht gestellt, sie sollen eine ‘Anti-Extremismus-Erklärung’ unterzeichnen. Das Alternative Kultur- und Bildungszentrum Sächsische Schweiz (AKuBiZ) aus Pirna hat daher auf den Preis verzichtet.

Die komplexe politische Realtät - ganz einfach in einer Achse...

“Als Nominierte für den Sächsischen Demokratiepreis sollten wir eine “antiextremistische” Grundsatzerklärung unterschreiben, deren Inhalt zweifelhaft und kritikwürdig ist”, erklärte das AKuBiZ. So sei man beispielsweise aufgefordert worden, alle Partner auf “Extremismus” zu prüfen. Dafür seien Nachfragen bei den Verfassungsschutzämtern vorgeschlagen worden.

Dazu erklärt Steffen Richter, Vereinsvorsitzender: “Die Aufforderung an uns, unsere Kooperationspartner auszuleuchten, erinnert eher an Methoden der Stasi und nicht an die Grundlagen einer Demokratie. Selbstverständlich wählen wir seit Jahren unsere Partner danach aus, ob sie demokratische Werte teilen, sich gegen Diskriminierung und für gesellschaftliche Teilhabe einsetzen.” Steffen Richter sagte weiter: “Bundesfamilienministerin Schröder hat mit ihrer Aussage “Wer damit schon ein Problem hat, der demaskiert sich selbst.“ bereits jetzt deutlich gemacht, was sie von den demokratiefördernden Initiativen hält.

[...]

NPD-BLOG.INFO ist ein Recherche- und Dokumentationsprojekt zu den Themen Rechtsextremismus, Neonazis, NPD sowie menschenfeindliche Einstellungen.

Reposted byPolitikZitate PolitikZitate

May 31 2010

Israelische U-Boote im Golf von Persien? | Florian Rötzer - Telepolis pnews - 20100531

[...]

Hintergrund sei die Sorge Israels, dass Raketen, die von Iran und Syrien an die Hisbollah geliefert worden seien, Ziele in ganz Israel treffen könnten. Die U-Boete sollen [...] Mossad-Agenten die Möglichkeiten bieten, besser Informationen sammeln zu können. Kurz vor dem Besuch Netanayahus im Weißen Haus verbreitet, könnte die Meldung aber auch gezielte Desinformation in der Gerüchteküche des Nahes Ostens sein. [...] [I]m seit Jahren währenden rhetorischen Schlagabtausch [...] könnte die Meldung schlicht ein Versuch der psychologischen Kriegsführung sein [...]

Netanyahu erklärt in einem Interview, Teile des Berichts seien "völlig unwahr". Es stimme aber, dass Israel versuche zu verhindern, dass weiterhin zigtausende Raketen zur Hamas und Hisbollah vom Iran aus geliefert werden. Ansonsten versicherte Netanyahu, Israel habe überhaupt keine U-Boote, die mit Atomwaffen bestückt werden könnten.

Israelische U-Boote im Golf von Persien? | Florian Rötzer - Telepolis pnews - 20100531

[...]

Hintergrund sei die Sorge Israels, dass Raketen, die von Iran und Syrien an die Hisbollah geliefert worden seien, Ziele in ganz Israel treffen könnten. Die U-Boote sollen [...] Mossad-Agenten die Möglichkeiten bieten, besser Informationen sammeln zu können. Kurz vor dem Besuch Netanayahus im Weißen Haus verbreitet, könnte die Meldung aber auch gezielte Desinformation in der Gerüchteküche des Nahes Ostens sein. [...] [I]m seit Jahren währenden rhetorischen Schlagabtausch [...] könnte die Meldung schlicht ein Versuch der psychologischen Kriegsführung sein [...]

Netanyahu erklärt in einem Interview, Teile des Berichts seien "völlig unwahr". Es stimme aber, dass Israel versuche zu verhindern, dass weiterhin zigtausende Raketen zur Hamas und Hisbollah vom Iran aus geliefert werden. Ansonsten versicherte Netanyahu, Israel habe überhaupt keine U-Boote, die mit Atomwaffen bestückt werden könnten.

May 17 2010

Privacy is not dead

Privacy is not dead. Privacy – and control over various options more generally – is only becoming more important.
It seems Web 3.0 will emphasize the facilitation of Choice (which includes the possibility to easily control privacy settings).

It looks like Facebook has gone the opposite way, missing the opportunity to become the Universal Platform for the three big C’s: Control, Choice and Customization. Facebook succeeds in doing all kinds of 2.0 things, but these don’t seem to be enough for the next round, which is expected to revolve around the key 3.0 components: Control, Choice and Customization.

The real nature of Twitter is its Free Advertising Business Model. There is nothing “social” about Twitter following. Following in Twitter is a Consumers’ subscription to receive information from Advertisers, using Twitter’s Free Advertising Engine.

And of course, Buzz is simply Google’s implementation of the idea of Twitter. By focusing on asymmetrical following, Twitter and Buzz are the facilitators of Choice. Their more mature versions, including Twitter Annotations and Buzz API, is the beginning of Web 3.0 – the Web of Choice.


April 21 2010

02mydafsoup-01
Computer, sagt der amerikanische Mathematiker Steve Strogatz, berechnen mittlerweile Dinge, die auch die brillantesten Mathematiker nicht mehr überprüfen können.
Macht der Simulation: Plötzlich sind wir alle Zuschauer - Digitales Denken - Feuilleton - FAZ.NET

March 15 2010

02mydafsoup-01

Ein Indiz mehr, warum ich auch in Sachen 'Westerwelle' so pessimistisch bin...

Ein Indiz mehr, warum ich auch in Sachen 'Westerwelle' so pessimistisch bin - laizistische Triebtäter, Hartz-Vier-Empfänger, Killerspiele und die EU, das sind die herausragenden Feindbilder, die den wahren Seelenfrieden deutschsprachiger Gemüter gefährden - man nörgelt wie eh und je kleinlaut in seiner gehegten Idylle vor sich hin und brütet emsig an den Kuckucks-Eiern der rund um die Uhr aufwändig in Szene gesetzten Alpha-Tiere.

oanth muc 20100315

February 15 2010

January 25 2010

Wollt ihr die totale IT?

  

Neulich sickerte durch, dass die Videoströme aus den unbemannten Flugdrohnen, die über Afghanistan und den pakistanischen Stammengebieten einherschweben, von unbefugter Seite angezapft werden. Ein weiterer bemerkenswerter Hinweis in dem Zusammenhang ist dabei etwas in den Hintergrund getreten: die Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) sammeln wesentlich mehr Informationen, als die Geheimdienste auswerten können. Einem Bericht der New York Times zufolge haben die Drohnen im vergangenen Jahr bereits dreimal mehr Material aufgezeichnet als noch 2007. Die gesamten Aufnahmen am Stück anzusehen, würde rund 24 Jahre dauern.

 

Je mehr Maschen ein Netz hat…
(Foto: cortneymartin82, Flickr/CC) →

  

Besonders heikel ist, dass die fliegenden Augen nicht nur aufklären sollen, sondern auch Hellfire-Raketen auf Gegner am Boen abschießen. Natürlich gibt es Auswerter-Teams, die den Livestreams aus den UAVs folgen und verdächtige oder interessante Stellen zu einer detaillierteren Nachsichtung markieren. Aber “die Dienste haben immer noch Probleme damit, aus der Datenfülle schlau zu werden.” Das Bildvolumen wird weiter zunehmen, da immer mehr Drohnen eingesetzt werden, die teilweise auch bereits mit mehreren Kameras ausgestattet sind. Fieberhaft wird nach Techniken gesucht, mit denen das Bildmaterial schneller und effektiver gesichtet und kontextualisiert werden kann.

Mehr Technologie! Seit Jahren rufen Sicherheitstechnokraten nach maschineller Hochrüstung, ob beim Militär, bei Geheimdiensten oder in der Öffentlichkeit (meist gleichfalls in Form von Videoüberwachung und bilderkennender Software).

Im Sommer 2005 mußte Glenn Fine, damals Generalinspektor des US-Justizministeriums, dem Senat einen unangenehmen Report vorstellen: Beim FBI hatte sich im Jahr davor der unaufgearbeitete Rückstau von Informationen mit möglichem terroristischen Zusammenhang verdoppelt. Es handelte sich nicht um Informationen erster Priorität, aber das FBI konnte nicht sicher sein, dass die rund 8300 Stunden unübersetzten Abhör-Materials nicht doch irgendwelche Hinweise enthielten, die der Terrorismusbekämpfung dienen könnten.

Im Jahr 2003 waren PowerPoint-Präsentationen als Auslöser von Daten-Tsunamis in Mißkredit geraten: Beim US-Militär liebt man PowerPoint-Präsentationen, und während des Afghanistan-Einsatzes verursachten die oft gigantischen Dateien Staus im Netz. Captain John Wisecup, der einen Verband von Zerstörern im Golf befehligte, verbot als erster das Mailen von PowerPoint-Präsentationen auf seine Schiffe. “Wir haben uns für schlichten, schwarzweissen Text entschieden”, so Wisecup damals.

Die großen Systeme ähneln sich in ihrer digitalen Ineffizienz – in dem Glauben, dass es möglich sei, durch totale Informationsauswertung auch totales Wissen und damit die totale Absicherung vor, beispielsweise, einer Gefahr durch Terroristen zu erreichen. Der Mann, der neulich beinahe ein Flugzeug während der Landung in Detroit in die Luft gejagt hätte, war ohne spektakuläre Tricks durch die Suchraster der Sicherheitsdienste gelangt. Und er war nicht der erste, dem das gelungen ist.

Letztlich führt die massenhafte Produktion von Daten aus vermeintlichen Sicherheitsgründen in eine Endlosschleife – oder in eine Datensammlung, die so gewaltig ist, dass niemand mehr in der Lage sein wird, sie noch sinnvoll zu sichten. Der Begriff “Datenverarbeitung” führt auf verhängnisvolle Weise in die Irre, denn die Maschinen erzeugen vor allem Daten. Ob man es schafft, diese dann auch zu “verarbeiten”, ist, siehe oben, eine offene Frage. Mit Netzen, Rastern und Matritzen ist es wie mit Damenstrümpfen: je mehr Maschen ein Netz hat, desto mehr Löcher hat es auch, automatisch.

   

(Erstveröffentlicht im Blog der Technology Review)


Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

July 17 2007

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl