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November 07 2013

Science Podcast - The Chelyabinsk meteorite, adaptation science, the forgotten malaria, and more (8 Nov 2013)

Peter Jenniskens discusses findings from the Chelyabinsk meteorite; Richard Moss outlines the future of adaptation science; Gretchen Vogel talks about the battle against the "forgotten" malaria.

August 01 2013

Science Podcast - Special issue on climate change ecology (2 August 2013)

Richard Norris talks about what past oceans reveal about the climate future; Jessica Blois looks for patterns in biotic interactions; Sonia Altizer discusses how infectious diseases may change; Eli Kintisch focuses on migrating marshes.

July 18 2013

TERRA 815: WildFIRE PIRE: The Core of the Problem

WildFIRE PIRE is a National Science Foundation five-year project that is an international partnership coordinated by the Montana Institute on Ecosystems and Montana State University that focuses on the causes and consequences of fire in the past, present, and future. Scientists from research universities and agencies in the United States, Tasmania, and New Zealand have combined efforts to compare how past fire occurrences have influenced climate change and what these patterns can tell us about the future. With the primary areas of study in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, Australia’s Tasmanian conservation areas, New Zealand’s forests, and Patagonia’s wild places, the project is exploring how wildfires, which are often devastating, are related to climate change. What is the fire history of New Zealand's unique landscape? Fire scientists from around the globe converge on New Zealand's many lakes extracting sediment cores that tell the story of New Zealand before and after the arrival of Maori and European settlers.

June 27 2013

Science Podcast - Tracking Voyager, soil microbes, fighting cancer, and more (28 June 2013)

Edward Stone describes signals sent from Voyager as it reaches the edge of the solar system; Ferran Garcia-Pichel discusses climate change's effect on microorganisms; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel outlines a personalized technique to fight cancer.

May 10 2013

TERRA 810: WildFIRE PIRE: A Ring of Fire

WildFIRE PIRE is a National Science Foundation five-year project that is an international partnership coordinated by the Montana Institute on Ecosystems and Montana State University that focuses on the causes and consequences of fire in the past, present, and future. Scientists from research universities and agencies in the United States, Tasmania, and New Zealand have combined efforts to compare how past fire occurrences have influenced climate change and what these patterns can tell us about the future. With the primary areas of study in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, Australia’s Tasmanian conservation areas, New Zealand’s forests, and Patagonia’s wild places, the project is exploring how wildfires, which are often devastating, are related to climate change. Produced by: WildFIRE PIRE

April 12 2013

TERRA 808: TRUST Massachusetts

Eshe is an 18-year old French horn playing, basketball playing, systems thinker that just started her freshman year at Yale so she can continue to learn how to solve complex problems with comprehensive and feasible solutions. She is also one of the many youth from across the United States who is taking legal action to compel comprehensive, science-based, government action on climate change as part of the TRUST Campaign. Produced by: WITNESS

March 29 2013

TERRA 807: Inches of Snow and Tide

The Olympic Peninsula is a land of snowy mountains, rocky tidepools, and crashing waves. Explore one small patch of coastline at low tide and you can find tiny sea stars, camouflaged fish, and eighty-year-old anemones. Fantastic seaweeds cling to wave battered rocks, and carnivorous sea stars stalk mussels and unsuspecting clams. These areas also serve as a rich natural resource for the four local tribes of Native Americans. Climate change could change all of that. Measuring snow depths on Hurricane Ridge and ocean temperatures in the intertidal zone, scientists share their hopes and concerns for the future of a rugged and incredibly diverse ecosystem.

March 14 2013

Science Podcast - T cell diversity, geoengineering policy, SARS, and more (15 Mar 2013)

Carmen Gerlach stresses the importance of T cell diversity in the immune response; Edward Parson advises improving the policies governing geoengineering research; Dennis Normile outlines the lessons learned from SARS; and more.

February 23 2013

February 16 2013

Science Podcast – Designing Bio-Friendly Plastics - AAAS Meeting [Feb 16, 2013]

Stephen Miller discusses some biomass-derived and biodegradable alternatives to synthetic polymers.

February 07 2013

Science Podcast - Mercury-methylating bacteria, vultures and public health, climate-adaptable crops, and more (8 Feb 2013)

Liyuan Liang answers the question of how methylmercury accumulates in the environment; Andrew Balmford describes the resuscitation of vulture populations in India; Christina Larson discusses the urgency of climate change research in China; and more.

February 01 2013

TERRA 803: WildFIRE PIRE: A World On Fire

WildFIRE PIRE is a National Science Foundation five-year project that is an international partnership coordinated by the Montana Institute on Ecosystems and Montana State University that focuses on the causes and consequences of fire in the past, present, and future. Scientists from research universities and agencies in the United States, Tasmania, and New Zealand have combined efforts to compare how past fire occurrences have influenced climate change and what these patterns can tell us about the future. With the primary areas of study in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, Australia’s Tasmanian conservation areas, New Zealand’s forests, and Patagonia’s wild places, the project is exploring how wildfires, which are often devastating, are related to climate change.

January 22 2013

02mydafsoup-01

Thus is the power of graphic representation

Do I understand the graph well - the red written explication is related to the whole black line, which has no relation to the x and y scales? - then it should presumingly only show the relative development between carbon dioxide incl. volcanism and the yearly temperature, which is in MHO hardly convincing, if I try to to understand the obvious down drops in the years of strong volcanic activities. But to interpret the black graph as an average temperature isn't nether very helpful comparing the line with the yearly temperature amplitudes.

Also: 1956 seems for me a pretty late starting point "attributed to human activities" - but there is certainly something like proofing ability or disability by statistics to consider, and we know that the winters during WW2 and especially in the second half of the 1940 were in Europe relatively cold. The graphic as a whole seems to have its flaws - it is lacking a contextual explication.

02mydafsoup-01
Next time you hear that vulcanoes are cause of global warming
Reposted fromscience science

December 07 2012

TERRA 723: TRUST Oregon

TRUST Oregon features Kelsey Cascadia Rose Juliana, a 16-year-old from Eugene, who is passionate about preserving this beautiful Earth. Kelsey's identity is directly tied to the various elements of Oregon's biodiversity. She was born in a 1-room cabin in Fall Creek amidst the old-growth trees of the Cascades. She was named after Kelsey Creek - a crystal-clear river that flows out of an ancient forest grove, and Rose signifies the wild rose that grew abundantly near the cabin where she was born. Kelsey knows that she is not old enough to vote, but she has also learned that she can raise her voice by speaking out. Although it shouldn't be the responsibility of her generation to take on the burden of learning how to adapt in the face of global climate change, Kelsey knows that Mother Earth does not have the time to wait for politicians to debate about whether climate change will affect our future.

November 08 2012

Science Podcast - coral bodyguards, climate and the Maya, weather forecasting, and more (9 November 2012)

A chemical symbiosis between corals and neighboring fishes; climate change and the fall of the ancient Maya; improvements and challenges in weather forecasting; and more.

July 20 2012

TERRA 713: TRUST Colorado

In this episode of the TRUST series, meet Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, an 11-year-old boy from Boulder, Colorado. Xiuhtezcatl shares why he joined youth from across the country asking the courts to hear their lawsuit (Alec L., et al., v. Lisa P. Jackson, et al.), which is based on one of the most fundamental principles of civilized society: TRUST. Xiuhtezcatl asks that our atmosphere be protected, because he loves playing in Colorado’s mountains, forests, lakes, and streams and fears that the resources he most enjoys will not be there for his generation if we continue emitting carbon dioxide at current rates. Xiuhtezcatl shares, “The proof of climate change is everywhere I look. In my lifetime, the amount of forest killed by pine beetles has expanded. The number of acres burned has intensified. My generation is losing our forests. We are losing our homes. It’s not too late to ensure my generation has a livable future. But we need to listen to the science and act now.” Over a century ago, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that our federal government has an absolute legal duty to protect our essential common natural resources – such as our air and our water - for present and future generations. Our youth are simply asking our third branch of government to compel the legislative and executive branches to do their jobs. For more information about the lawsuits and other TRUST youth, please visit: www.ourchildrenstrust.org and www.witness.org

April 28 2012

TERRA 707: TRUST Arizona

In this episode of the TRUST Series, meet Jaime Lynn Butler, an 11-year-old Navajo artist, who recognizes the extreme difficulty this administration faces dealing with the current political climate crisis. On January 24, 2012, during the State of the Union address, President Obama recognized that, “The differences in this chamber may be too deep right now to pass a comprehensive plan to fight climate change.” However, Jaime also recognizes the guaranteed consequences of climate change if America fails to do more than what is politically feasible. According to leading climate scientists, the Earth is in “imminent peril.” Should we fail to make a massive assault on CO2 pollution, the entire life-support system of our civilization and our species will begin to unravel. Because Jaime knows that human-induced climate change is a matter of carbon math, not carbon politics, Jaime is not only writing to President Obama and asking for assistance, she is also sharing her story with others so that we can visualize the urgent and unstoppable nature of human-induced climate change.

January 31 2012

Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism

Some of the iconic winter landscapes by Pieter Bruegel the Elder are more than just fine examples of sixteenth-century Dutch art. Paintings such as Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow (1565) also serve as vivid evidence for the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period of cold climate conditions and glacier advances in Europe and elsewhere that lasted from the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century.

There has been quite some debate over the years about the precise onset and the physical causes of this extended cold spell, with one school of thought favouring low solar activity during the ‘Maunder Minimum’ and another the cooling effect of big volcanic eruptions.

A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters may put the solar-trigger hypothesis at rest. Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado in Boulder and his colleagues suggest that the Little Ice Age began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 AD following four large sulfur-rich explosive eruptions, most likely in the tropics, over a mere 50-year period.

Sulfate particles hurled high up into the atmosphere by the massive eruptions would have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the ground and caused a series of cold summers. The found that ice-growth records from Baffin Island and Iceland indicate that glaciers and Arctic sea ice did advance abruptly at the time.  The resulting climate feedbacks seem to have maintained cold conditions for centuries.

“What is new in this study is that the authors have data on the growth of small icecaps in Canada and Iceland, showing a rapid increase in ice volume at the end of the thirteenth and close to the middle of the fifteenth century,” says Georg Feulner, a climate scientist at the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research in Germany.

“These periods coincide with phases of strong volcanic eruptions, but a mechanism is required to produce cooling on longer timescales as the temperature drop after volcanic eruptions typically last only for a few years. In climate model simulations, the authors find that the persistent cooling observed in the climate records can be explained by expanded sea ice resulting in cooling by the ice-albedo feedback mechanism, and cooling in large parts of the North Atlantic by sea-ice export from the Arctic.”

Over at the New York Times DotEarth blog, Jennifer Francis, a climate and sea-ice researcher at Rutgers University in New Jersey, comments on the importance of the findings:

During the past several decades we have seen the enhanced warming of the Arctic owing to a variety of feedbacks involving snow, sea ice, and water vapor, but Arctic Amplification also works in the reverse direction, as in the case of the little ice age.

If a similar series of strong volcanic eruptions were to happen in the next few decades, we would likely experience global cooling with an amplified response at high latitudes. As long as greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, however, the cooling can only be temporary.

Reposted fromSigalontech Sigalontech

January 21 2012

TERRA 620: TRUST Series #2

TRUST is a 10-part series about a perfect trifecta. The Public Trust Doctrine is a legal doctrine enshrined in the laws of every civilized government and holds governments accountable to protect the resources we share in common and depend on for our very survival. The principle of inter-generational justice is enshrined in international human rights law ? simply put, it means that the adults can't have a party on the planet and leave it a mess for the kids. Combine the Public Trust Doctrine with the principles of intergenerational justice and passionate youth, who are fighting for their future in the courts and on the streets, and we have the perfect trifecta. Why? Because youth across the country are bringing legal actions - based on trust - against the federal and state governments, so we will open our eyes and protect our atmosphere and our futures with smart strategies rooted in science. In Part 2 of the TRUST Series, meet Nelson Kanuk, a 17-year old who learned how climate change was affecting his community and felt he could best help by sharing his story. In this 8-minute film, Nelson explains that the main problem facing the northern parts of the world is that winter is coming later and later. This results in increased erosion due to permafrost melt, increased flooding due to warmer temperatures, and intensified storms because the sea ice forms later in the season and is unable to provide a natural barrier for our coastal communities. This, in turn, leads in the loss of homes, communities, cultures, and a way of life. Go to http://ourchildrenstrust.org/ to learn more about the campaign.
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