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December 31 2010

Four short links: 31 December 2010

  1. The Joy of Stats -- Hans Rosling's BBC documentary on statistics, available to watch online.
  2. Best Tech Writing of 2010 -- I need a mass "add these to Instapaper" button. (via Hacker News)
  3. Google Shared Spaces: Why We Made It (Pamela Fox) -- came out of what people were trying to do with Google Wave.
  4. The Great Delicious Exodus -- traffic graph as experienced by pinboard.

December 28 2010

Four short links: 28 December 2010

  1. Amazon Sold 158 Items/Second on Cyber Monday (TechCrunch) -- I remember when 20 hits/s on a Sun web server was considered pretty friggin' amazing. Just pause a moment and ponder the infrastructure Amazon has marshaled to be able to do this: data centers, replication, load balancers, payment processing, fulfillment, elastic cloud computing, storage servers, cheap power, bandwidth beyond comprehension.
  2. Quick Thoughts on Pinboard (Matt Haughey) -- thoughtful comments, and an immediate and just as thoughtful response. (I am a happy pinboard user who is also looking forward to the social networking features to come)
  3. Female Founders -- impressively long list of female startup founders. (via Hacker News)
  4. Less Framework -- cross-device css grid system based on using inline media queries. (via Pinboard)

June 15 2010

Four short links: 15 June 2010

  1. On Bookmarking: Dogears and Marginalia -- asking the question "how do you bookmark in real life?". I'm interested because I have recently begun obsessively collecting the good quotes and references from books I read, thanks to Amazon Kindle app's highlights. (via titine on Delicious)
  2. Systems for Open Electronic Lab Notebooks -- question from a very respected scientist (Jonathan Eisen, king of the phylogenetic tree and "phylogenomics" on Twitter) about tools and software for open lab notebooks. Turns out it's by no means a solved problem, so a good hacker working with such a lab could do some good things for science.
  3. Starbucks, Wifi, Paid Content (ReadWriteWeb) -- Starbucks announced free wifi, from which customers can access content they'd otherwise have to pay for (e.g., WSJ). Interesting to me for several reasons: libraries also offer access to information you'd otherwise not have access to; and Starbucks are turning the physical store into a virtual one as well.
  4. Writing Great Documentation (Jacob Kaplan-Moss) -- it's all true, read it and write.

April 25 2010

02mydafsoup-01

Faviki - Social bookmarking tool using smart semantic Wikipedia (DBpedia) tags

Faviki is a tool that brings together social bookmarking and Wikipedia. It lets you bookmark web pages using Wikipedia's terms. In Faviki, everybody uses the same names for tags from the world's largest collection of knowledge!

Thanks to DBpedia, which extracts structured information from Wikipedia and represents it in a flexible data model, these tags are references to objects which are categorized automatically, keeping your and your friends' bookmarks and interests well organized.

About the author

Vuk Milicic is a founder of Faviki. He is a web developer and designer from Belgrade, Serbia.

Vuk has experience developing websites for various clients from Serbia, Montenegro, Croatia, Slovenia, Greece, Germany, France, Canada and USA.

He believes that semantic tags can change today's messy web, and make the foundation of the universal language that could connect people and the Internet in new and exciting ways.

Reposted fromSigalon02 Sigalon02
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