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September 24 2014

September 23 2014

02mydafsoup-01

July 23 2013

un BookScanner à Paris - La belle histoire d'une machine à scanner les livres, faite maison par des…

un BookScanner à Paris - La belle histoire d’une machine à scanner les livres, faite maison par des hackeurs, amateurs et passionnés
http://www.bookscanner.fr

La belle histoire d’une machine à scanner les livres, faite maison par des hackeurs, amateurs et passionnés

avec du benji inside

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWGtDaYHyPo

http://seenthis.net/messages/7778

#DIY #livre #book #scanner #libre

July 29 2012

January 26 2012

November 30 2011

The paperless book

Stephen Colbert opened his October 25th, 2011, show with his normal exuberance. He bragged about his special early access to the iPhone, the iPad, and the iV (a product that feeds the Internet directly into your veins; he assured us a short wait of six months before its release). The release of Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs" would be no different, as Colbert pulled the 600-page biography from behind his desk. But Colbert immediately became perplexed.

The single finger touchscreen swipe on the cover didn't turn pages. When you turned the book upside down, the picture didn't reorient. Colbert complained there was no place to plug in his headphones so he could listen to it. And then he tried to activate the voice recognition by touching the bottom of the cover, "Tell me about Steve Jobs. Where is the nearest church or camera store?" He ended the segment saying that the device would soon be released with "a revolutionary softcover." The jokes played well to the geekish sensibilities of the studio audience, but I am not sure even the show's writers knew how well the sketch described the confused state of book publishing.

"Steve Jobs" will serve as a prominent road marker on the path from atoms to bits. The decision for Simon & Schuster to hold the digital release of the biography for two weeks to match the physical release even after the death of Jobs is worthy of a Harvard Business School case. And at the same time, even as computers now interface with us in almost every aspect of our lives and Jobs' critical role in that proliferation, the majority of people will read his life story on paper.

Colbert poking fun at the Jobs biography repeats, again, a meme that we in the publishing industry should be gravely concerned about — our customers don't know what a book is anymore.

The consequences of book updates

In July 2011, I launched an experimental project with O'Reilly called "Every Book Is a Startup." The project is meant to poke at the boundaries of traditional publishing. The book was created around the idea that new material will be released over time, culminating in a finished work early in 2012. Readers are encouraged to constantly give feedback about the material. The pricing is dynamic, increasing slowly to match the amount of material released, but once purchased, a customer receives all future updates for free.

We are only using one distribution point at the start of the project, oreilly.com, because the distribution system for electronic books is not designed to allow an ebook to be updated and released again. You might remember one of the side effects of Amazon's 2009 recall of "1984" was that after the book was restored, customers found their bookmarks and notes had disappeared.

We, unfortunately, found the same problem with our release strategy. Wonderful publishing startups like Readmill and SocialBook have created the possibility for readers using EPUB files to highlight important passages and share those with others back through the web, but when a reader of "Every Book Is A Startup" loads a new edition, their digital artifacts suffer the same fate as the readers of "1984" — the loss of their old thoughts as I present them with my new ones.

I have been hesitant to call "Every Book Is A Startup" a book because of the expectations people hold for a book: a finished work, written from a position of singular authority, available in some way in a physical form. What I never expected was how strongly the qualities of a book would be brought forward from the physical to the digital. Digital books have been designed to carry forward the same atomic quality of immutability of physical books. As I reached out to my colleagues working in the world of ebooks, the consensus was that no one had considered a reality where an author, given the ability to distribute directly and virtually cost free, would consider updating their work and the consequences that might have.

Bits and atoms don't behave the same way, but we have built the next step forward in publishing as though they do.

Possibilities arise from a new name

The trouble to this point is that a book is a book. Stacey Madden used precisely those words to title an essay in the inaugural issue of "Toronto Review of Books" that describes this predicament. "I do not mean to argue the advantages of paperbound books over their electronic counterparts," wrote Madden. "The contents of both are, for the most part, the same, and the differences lie mainly in medium. I am simply pointing out a semantic fact. E-books are not 'books' but digitized compositions." She firmly believes the book's 550-year-old meaning that connects both form and format should be maintained. "Before a collection of human thoughts is transformed into what we call a 'book,' it is merely a story, a manuscript, a document, or a text." Madden points to the need for more of us to see the difference between a book and its electronic counterparts.

Now, Madden writes further about the poetic qualities of the book and declares the superiority of the bound volume for its weight, smell, and ability to act as apartment furnishing. This judgment undermines the broader point and shows from another perspective the real trouble we are in.

The people who love books for what they are and what they have been are grabbing for their hardcovers and their paperbacks and saying "This word belongs to us." The digerati paving the way with wireless tablets and social networking recommendation services are trying to say, "You don't understand, we have books and we have made them way better." This is messy and leads to confusion.

We are living through a time in book publishing where words fail us, a situation that we should all find some irony in given the products we sell. We need some new language that describes what happens and, more importantly, what is possible when the words are separated from the paper. Those two things need to be separated so we can build systems and infrastructures that support the new capabilities of the technology.

For several decades, what we know today as a "car" was referred to as a "horseless carriage." It was easier to describe this new invention as what it was not, rather than what it was.

Maybe there are books and there are paperless books. I know it is a little awkward, and you want to ask yourself, "What does that mean?" — but when you remove the paper from a book, it becomes so much easier to see the possibilities.

TOC NY 2012 — O'Reilly's TOC Conference, being held Feb. 13-15, 2012, in New York City, is where the publishing and tech industries converge. Practitioners and executives from both camps will share what they've learned and join together to navigate publishing's ongoing transformation.

Register to attend TOC 2012

Photo credit for associated book picture used on home and category pages: Old book (1882) by VanDammeMaarten.be, on Flickr

Related:

May 13 2011

02mydafsoup-01

+ Buchkritik im Hörfunk
Roman zum Tschetschenienkrieg
(dra) - Wladimir Makanin: "Benzinkönig"
Generation auf wackligen Füßen
(dra) - Kunze/Zeug: "Ab 18 - Was junge Menschen wirklich machen"
Mehrdeutiges Zentralorgan
(dra) - Peter Stephan Jungk: "Das elektrische Herz", Zsolnay Verlag
Ein unvergleichliches Trauma-Team
(dra) - Thomas Harlan: "Veit"
Sternstunde einer großen Dichterin
(dra) - Nelly Sachs: "Szenische Dichtungen"
Neuausgabe
(dra) - Hans Fallada: "Jeder stirbt für sich allein"

Kulturtipps
(dra-audio) - 13.05.2011

Mehr Literatur zum Jetzt-Hören
siehe Radio-Kultur-Programm
www.perlentaucher.de | 2011-05-13

April 07 2011

Four short links: 7 April 2011

  1. The Freight Train That is Android -- Google’s aim is defensive not offensive. They are not trying to make a profit on Android or Chrome. They want to take any layer that lives between themselves and the consumer and make it free (or even less than free). [...] In essence, they are not just building a moat; Google is also scorching the earth for 250 miles around the outside of the castle to ensure no one can approach it. (via Fred Wilson)
  2. Group Think (New York Magazine) -- Big Idea tomes typically pull promiscuously from behavioral economics, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology. They coin phrases the way Zimbabwe prints bills. They relish upending conventional wisdom: Not thinking becomes thinking, everything bad turns out to be good, and the world is—go figure—flat. (With Gladwell’s Blink, this mania for the counterintuitive runs top-speed into a wall, crumples to the ground, and stares dizzily at the little birds circling overhead. This is, let me remind you, a best-selling book about the counterintuitive importance of thinking intuitively.) A piercing take on pop science/fad management books.
  3. Product Design at GitHub -- Every employee at GitHub is a product designer. We only hire smart people we trust to make our product better. We don’t have managers dictating what to work on. We don’t require executive signoff to ship features. Executives, system administrators, developers, and designers concieve, ship, and remove features alike. (via Simon Willison)
  4. Linus on Android Headers Claims -- "seems totally bogus". I blogged the Android headers claim earlier, have been meaning to run this rather definitive "ignore it, it was noise" note. Apologies for showing you crap that was wrong: that's why I try not to show weather-report "news", but to find projects that illustrate trends.

April 04 2011

Four short links: 4 April 2011

  1. Find The Future -- New York Public Library big game, by Jane McGonigal. (via Imran Ali)
  2. Enable Certificate Checking on Mac OS X -- how to get your browser to catch attempts to trick you with revoked certificates (more of a worry since security problems at certificate authorities came to light). (via Peter Biddle)
  3. Clever Algorithms -- Nature-Inspired Programming Recipes from AI, examples in Ruby. I hadn't realized there were Artificial Immune Systems. Cool! (via Avi Bryant)
  4. Rethinking Evaluation Metrics in Light of Flickr Commons -- conference paper from Museums and the Web. As you move from "we are publishing, you are reading" to a read-write web, you must change your metrics. Rather than import comments and tags directly into the Library's catalog, we verify the information then use it to expand the records of photos that had little description when acquired by the Library. [...] The symbolic 2,500th record, a photo from the Bain collection of Captain Charles Polack, is illustrative of the updates taking place based on community input. The new information in the record of this photo now includes his full name, death date, employer, and the occasion for taking the photo, the 100th Atlantic crossing as ocean liner captain. An additional note added to the record points the Library visitor to the Flickr conversation and more of the story with references to gold shipments during WWI. Qualitative measurements, like level of engagement, are a challenge to gauge and convey. While resources expended are sometimes viewed as a cost, in this case they indicate benefit. If you don't measure the right thing, you'll view success as a failure. (via Seb Chan)

April 01 2011

February 16 2011

Four short links: 16 February 2011

  1. Interactive Treemap for the Budget (NY Times) -- why don't government departments produce and release these automatically? (via Flowing Data)
  2. Hold Conversations Not Meetings (HBR) -- that sentence perfectly captures the heart of Foo Camp. (via Hacker News)
  3. Kiwi Foo 2011 Book Recommendations -- we held a "which books are you reading, or would recommend?" session and this is the collected output.
  4. Hackers, Transparency, and the Zen of Failure -- If hackers can't create something with the data, they won't do anything with it. The idea of an "army of armchair auditors" becomes a functional paradox, as the people the Government has in mind for the data apparently sit in armchairs, while the hackers sit in cafes, meet in pubs, and generally find comfy chairs far too comfy to code in. (via Public Strategist)

February 15 2011

February 04 2011

Four short links: 4 February 2011

  1. Access to Knowledge in the Age of Intellectual Property (MIT Press) -- with essays by knowledgeable folks such as Yochai Benkler, Larry Lessig, and Jo Walsh. Available as open access (free) ebook as well as paper. I love it that we can download these proper intellectuals' intellectual property. (via BoingBoing)
  2. AwesomeChartJS -- Apache-licensed Javascript library for charting. (via Hacker News)
  3. Be Open from Day One -- advice from Karl Fogel (author of the excellent Producing Open Source Software, which O'Reilly publishes) for projects that think they may some day be open source: f you’re running a government software project and you plan to make it open source eventually, then just make it open source from the beginning. Waiting will only create more work. (via timoreilly on Twitter)
  4. MALLET -- open source (CPL-licensed) Java-based package for statistical natural language processing, document classification, clustering, topic modeling, information extraction, and other machine learning applications to text.

October 06 2010

Four short links: 6 October 2010

  1. “Poetic” Statistical Machine Translation: Rhyme and Meter (PDF) -- Google Research paper on how to machine translate text into poetry. This is the best paper I've read in a long time: clever premise, straightforward implementation, and magnificent results. There's a very workable translation of Oscar Wilde's "Ballad of Reading Gaol" into a different meter, which you'll know isn't easy if you've ever tried your hand at poetry more complex than "there once was a young man called Enis". (via Poetic Machine Translation on the Google Research blog)
  2. Android Most Popular Operating System in US Among Recent Smartphone Buyers (Nielsen blog) -- the graphs say it all. Note how the growth in Android handset numbers doesn't come at the expense of Blackberry or iPhone users? Android users aren't switchers, they're new smartphone owners. (via Hacker News)
  3. Government Data to be Machine Readable (Guardian) -- UK government to require all responses to Freedom of Information Act requests to be machine readable.
  4. jQuery Fundamentals -- CC-SA-licensed book on jQuery programming. (via darren on Twitter)

September 30 2010

Four short links: 30 September 2010

  1. Learn Python The Hard Way -- Zed Shaw's book on programming Python, written as 52 exercises: Each exercise is one or two pages and follows the exact same format. You type each one in (no copy-paste!), make it run, do the extra credit, and then move on. If you get stuck, at least type it in and skip the extra credit for later. This is brilliant—you learn by doing, and this book is all doing.
  2. When The Revolution Comes They Won't Recognize it (Anil Dash) -- nails the importance of Makers. Dale Dougherty and the dozens of others who have led Maker Faire, and the culture of "making", are in front of a movement of millions who are proactive about challenging the constrictions that law and corporations are trying to place on how they communicate, create and live. The lesson that simply making things is a radical political act has enormous precedence in political history.
  3. Truthy -- project tracking suspicious memes on Twitter.
  4. UK Open Government License -- standard license for open government information in the UK.

September 03 2010

Four short links: 3 Sep 2010

  1. Arranging Things: The Rhetoric of Object Placement (Amazon) -- [...] the underlying principles that govern how Western designers arrange things in three-dimensional compositions. Inspired by Greek and Roman notions of rhetoric [...] Koren elucidates the elements of arranging rhetoric that all designers instinctively use in everything from floral compositions to interior decorating. (via Elaine Wherry)
  2. 2010 Mario AI Championship -- three tracks: Gameplay, Learning, and Level Generation. Found via Ben Weber's account of his Level Generation entry. My submission utilizes a multi-pass approach to level generation in which the system iterates through the level several times, placing different types of objects during each pass. During each pass through the level, a subset of each object type has a specific probability of being added to the level. The result is a computationally efficient approach to generating a large space of randomized levels.
  3. Wave in a Box -- Google to flesh out existing open source Wave client and server into full "Wave in a Box" app status.
  4. 3D Sound in Google Earth (YouTube) -- wow. (via Planet In Action)

January 28 2010

Four short links: 28 January 2010

  1. TrueSwitch -- "the de facto proprietary API that all the big ISPs use to help users switch, a market opportunity that wouldn't exist if they just opened up access to each other" in the words of Pete Warden.
  2. Free Publicity: Who Do We Help? (Anil Dash) -- I love cool stuff as much as the next guy. What leaves me at a loss, though, is how many otherwise sane and sensible people give their time and energy freely to help support a company like Apple that, despite its elegant designs and generally excellent products (I use many of them), certainly doesn't need free PR from some of the most talented people on the web.
  3. World Government Data -- the Guardian build a meta-index to open government data from four countries and will add more as other countries build data.gov-like sites.
  4. Confessions of a Book Pirate -- lots of insights into how guerilla book piracy happens. The scanning process takes about 1 hour per 100 scans. Mass market paperbacks can be scanned two pages at a time flat on the scanner bed, while large trades and hardcovers usually need to be scanned one page at a time. I’m sure that some of the more hardcore scanners disassemble the book and run it through an automatic feeder or something, but I prefer the manual approach because I’d like to save the book, and don’t want to invest in the tools. Usually I can scan a book while watching a movie or two. (via waxy)

February 27 2009

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