Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

October 14 2011

Visualization of the Week: Sentiment in the Bible

New textual analysis tools are providing interesting insights into classic works of literature. Last month, for example, we looked at a visualization based on character frequency in Jane Austen novels.

Along similar lines, OpenBible.info has just released a visualization showing a sentiment analysis of the Bible.

A blog post announcing the visualization outlines the ebbs and flows that were uncovered:

Things start off well with creation, turn negative with Job and the patriarchs, improve again with Moses, dip with the period of the judges, recover with David, and have a mixed record (especially negative when Samaria is around) during the monarchy. The exilic period isn't as negative as you might expect, nor the return period as positive. In the New Testament, things start off fine with Jesus, then quickly turn negative as opposition to his message grows. The story of the early church, especially in the epistles, is largely positive.

Screenshot from OpenBible.info's Bible sentiment visualization
This Bible visualization from OpenBible.info includes both the Old and New Testaments. Black indicates a positive sentiment, red negative. (Click to enlarge.)

OpenBible.info created the visualization by running the Viralheat Sentiment API across a number of translations. The raw data from OpenBible's visualization is available for download.

A second visualization breaks down the sentiment by specific book, making it easier to see those that contain overwhelmingly positive sentiment (Psalms, for example), those that contain negative sentiment (Job), and those that go from bad to worse (Jonah).

Found a great visualization? Tell us about it

This post is part of an ongoing series exploring visualizations. We're always looking for leads, so please drop a line if there's a visualization you think we should know about.

Web 2.0 Summit, being held October 17-19 in San Francisco, will examine "The Data Frame" — focusing on the impact of data in today's networked economy.

Save $300 on registration with the code RADAR

More Visualizations:

May 23 2010

Moses und der brennende Dornbusch: Am Anfang war das Feuer | Frankfurter Rundschau - Feuilleton | Christian Thomas 20100522

[...]

In der Bibelepisode, im 2. Buch Mose 3, 6, hatte Jahwe sich als der Gott der Väter vorgestellt. Um Israel aus der Versklavung herauszuführen, ...

[....]

Wie auch immer die Moseerzählungen gelesen wurden, ob philologisch oder theologisch, historisch oder hermeneutisch, naiv oder naturwissenschaftlich, archäologisch oder allegorisch: In der Biografie Gottes bildet die Dornbusch-Episode ein entscheidendes Datum, in der Karriere des Jahwe-Glaubens einen entscheidenden Schritt hin zum unbedingten Gehorsam. Glaube und geschichtspolitischer Auftrag, Vertrauen in eine jenseitige Instanz und historische Mission finden sich in dieser Exodus-Episode.

Davon unbeirrt blieb seit Ewigkeiten der Schauplatz der überlieferten Gottesoffenbarung ein Rätsel. Irgendwo in Midian, aber wo? Nicht einmal der Gottesberg ist lokal zu fixieren, nicht philologisch, nicht theologisch, nicht archäologisch. Da hat sich dann die Allegorie der Sache angenommen, ....

[...]

Moses und der brennende Dornbusch: Am Anfang war das Feuer | Frankfurter Rundschau - Feuilleton | Christian Thomas 20100522

[...]

In der Bibelepisode, im 2. Buch Mose 3, 6, hatte Jahwe sich als der Gott der Väter vorgestellt. Um Israel aus der Versklavung herauszuführen, ...

[....]

Wie auch immer die Moseerzählungen gelesen wurden, ob philologisch oder theologisch, historisch oder hermeneutisch, naiv oder naturwissenschaftlich, archäologisch oder allegorisch: In der Biografie Gottes bildet die Dornbusch-Episode ein entscheidendes Datum, in der Karriere des Jahwe-Glaubens einen entscheidenden Schritt hin zum unbedingten Gehorsam. Glaube und geschichtspolitischer Auftrag, Vertrauen in eine jenseitige Instanz und historische Mission finden sich in dieser Exodus-Episode.

Davon unbeirrt blieb seit Ewigkeiten der Schauplatz der überlieferten Gottesoffenbarung ein Rätsel. Irgendwo in Midian, aber wo? Nicht einmal der Gottesberg ist lokal zu fixieren, nicht philologisch, nicht theologisch, nicht archäologisch. Da hat sich dann die Allegorie der Sache angenommen, ....

[...]
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl