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June 29 2011

Die ungefähre Frau



Georges Seurat, Eine Frau lehnt an einer Brüstung an der Seine (1881)

Die Wikipedia über den französischen Maler und - neben Paul Signac - wichtigsten Vertreter des Pointilismus, Georges Seurat (1859-1891).

(Gefunden bei Couleurs)

Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

RTFM: Hallo LulzSec, mal Bakunin lesen




Michail Alexandrowitsch Bakunin (1814–1876) war ein russischer Revolutionär und Anarchist. Er gilt als einer der einflussreichsten Denker der anarchistischen Bewegung und als deren erster Organisator.

.

(Gefunden bei i12bent)

Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

June 19 2011

June 09 2011

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June 08 2011

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0515 4077

rerylikes:

Henri Cartier-Bresson. Roland Barthes, 1963

“From the Desk of Roland Barthes” by Ben Kafka:
In this essay, the author examines a brief account by the historian Jacques Le Goff of Roland Barthes’s years as an administrator in the Sixth Section of the École Pratique des Hautes Études (which eventually became the EHESS). This account provides an opportunity for a more sustained reflection on writing, paperwork, and the problem of the materiality of communication. The author argues that some recent scholarship in book history, media studies, and related fields has neglected the unconscious dimensions of communication.

(via proustitute)

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// oAnth

    

[...]

   

The editors had invited him to take part in a forum on how writers were taking to the portable tape recorder: did he ever dictate to the machine? He answers with a firm no:

  

I love to write, and not speak, and when I write it’s by hand, not on a typewriter. Several factors contribute to this choice. First there is a refusal: my body refuses to speak out loud to . . . nobody. Unless I’m certain that another body is listening to me, my voice gets stuck, I can’t get it out. If, in a conversation, I notice that that somebody isn’t listening to me, I stop speaking, and it is simply beyond my power to leave a message on an answering machine (I don’t think I’m alone in this). Voices are made to reach out to the other; to speak alone, with a tape recorder, strikes me as terribly frustrating. My voice is literally cut off (castrated). There is nothing to be done, it is impossible for me to be on the receiving end of my own voice, which is the only thing the tape recorder has to offer me. My writing, meanwhile, is immediately destined for everybody. Its slow pace protects me: I have the time to dangle the wrong word from the tip of my pen, the word that “spontaneity” never ceases to generate. There is a great distance between my head and my hand and I take advantage of it in order to avoid saying the first thing that comes to me. Finally, and this is probably the real reason, the challenge of tracing words on paper has a truly sculptural jouissance [une véritable jouissance plastique]. If my voice brings me pleasure, that is only out of narcissism. Writing comes from my muscles. I abandon [jouis] myself to a kind of manual labor. I combine two “arts”: the textual and the graphic.


Here, we might say, is the reductio ad minimum at its most minimalist. And yet isn’t something missing here?


[...]

June 07 2011

02mydafsoup-01

Frühstück (1926)




Sergei Lobovikov (1870-1941), Bromöldruck

(Gefunden bei yama-bato)

Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

Muqarnas in der Alhambra

Muqarnas sind ein Stilelement der islamischen Architektur. Sie bestehen aus einer großen Anzahl spitzbogenartiger Elemente, die in- und übereinander gesetzt sind und einen Übergang zwischen einer Nische oder einer Kuppel und der Wand bilden. Komplexe, kunstvoll ausgebildete Muquarnas erinnern an Tropfsteinhöhlen, man nennt sie daher auch Stalaktitendekoration.

Die Alhambra im spanischen Granada ist eines der beeindruckendsten Beispiele des maurischen Stils der islamischen Kunst.



Aus dem Flickr-Photostream von Marcomorphosis:


(Gefunden bei tonguedepressors | via booksnbuildings)

Eine grandiose Animation: Isfahan von Cristóbal Vila und seiner Firma Etérea. Die virtuelle arabische Architektur ist größtenteils inspiriert von Bauwerken in der iranischen Stadt Isfahan. | Das Making of.


Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

June 06 2011

May 29 2011

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May 28 2011

9501 c708 500

Laika, the dog who became the first living creature sent into space, onboard Sputnik 2, November 1957. (via seashelllz)

Reposted fromsynmirror synmirror

May 22 2011

02mydafsoup-01

The Third Man (1949) directed by Carol Reed - Film noire - Music: Anton Karas


The third man (1949) directed by carol reed - film noire - music: anton karas | offene ablage: nothing to hide 2011-05-22 | oanth-miscellaneous | scoop.it
   
by oAnth:


- The film (British release without subtitles) is now completely available at Youtube - to see with all necessary links on oAnth / soup.io by clicking the entry title line ....
- .... together with 2 original recordings (1949/50) also via Youtube with zither player & composer Anton Karas playing his famous "Harry Lime Theme"


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From Wikipedia-Entry
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/The_Third_Man

[...]

Style

The atmospheric use of black-and-white expressionist cinematography by Robert Krasker, with harsh lighting and distorted camera angles, is a key feature of The Third Man. Combined with the unique theme music, seedy locations, and acclaimed performances from the cast, the style evokes the atmosphere of an exhausted, cynical post-war Vienna at the start of the Cold War. The film's unusual camera angles, however, were not appreciated by all critics at the time. C. A. Lejeune in The Observer described Reed's "habit of printing his scenes askew, with floors sloping at a diagonal and close-ups deliriously tilted" as "most distracting". American director William Wyler, a close friend of Reed's, sent him a spirit level, with a note saying, "Carol, next time you make a picture, just put it on top of the camera, will you?"[1]

Through the years there was occasional speculation that Welles, rather than Reed, was the de facto director of The Third Man. Film scholar Jonathan Rosenbaum, in his 2007 book, Discovering Orson Welles, calls it a "popular misconception",[2] although Rosenbaum did note that the film "began to echo the Wellesian theme of betrayed male friendship and certain related ideas from Citizen Kane."[3] In the final analysis, Rosenbaum writes, Welles "didn’t direct anything in the picture; the basics of his shooting and editing style, its music and meaning, are plainly absent. Yet old myths die hard, and some viewers persist in believing otherwise."[3] Welles himself fueled this theory with an interview he gave in 1958, in which he said that he had had an important role in making The Third Man, but that it was a “delicate matter, because [he] wasn’t the producer”.[4] However, he later admitted in a 1967 interview with Peter Bogdanovich that his involvement was minimal: "It was Carol's picture", he said.[5] However, Welles did contribute some of the film’s best-known dialogue. Bogdanovich also stated in the introduction to the DVD:

However, I think it’s important to note that the look of The Third Man—and, in fact, the whole film—would be unthinkable without Citizen Kane, The Stranger, and The Lady from Shanghai, all of which Orson made in the ’40s, and all of which preceded The Third Man. Carol Reed, I think, was definitely influenced by Orson Welles, the director, from the films he had made.[6]

Differences between releases

As the original British release begins, the voice of director Carol Reed, unnamed, is heard describing post-war Vienna from the point of view of a racketeer. The version shown in American theatres replaced this with narration by Joseph Cotten as Holly Martins. This change was instituted by David O. Selznick, who did not think American audiences would relate to the seedy tone of the original.[7] In addition, eleven minutes of footage were cut.[8] Today, Reed's original version appears on American DVDs, in showings on Turner Classic Movies, and in U.S. theatrical releases, with the eleven minutes of footage restored. Both the Criterion Collection and Studio Canal DVD releases include a comparison of the two opening monologues.

[...]

Reception

In Austria, "local critics were underwhelmed"[14] and the film ran for only a few weeks; William Cook, after his 2006 visit to an eight-room museum in Vienna dedicated to the film, wrote "In Britain it's a thriller about friendship and betrayal. In Vienna it's a tragedy about Austria's troubled relationship with its past."[14]

Upon its release in Britain and America, the film received overwhelmingly positive reviews.[15] Time magazine called the film "crammed with cinematic plums that would do the early Hitchcock proud—ingenious twists and turns of plot, subtle detail, full-bodied bit characters, atmospheric backgrounds that become an intrinsic part of the story, a deft commingling of the sinister with the ludicrous, the casual with the bizarre." ....

[...]

Music

The musical score was composed by Anton Karas and played by him on the zither. Before the production came to Vienna, Karas was an unknown wine bar performer. According to a November 1949 Time magazine article:[20]

The picture demanded music appropriate to post-World War II Vienna, but director Reed had made up his mind to avoid schmalzy, heavily orchestrated waltzes. In Vienna one night Reed listened to a wine-garden zitherist named Anton Karas, [and] was fascinated by the jangling melancholy of his music.

Reed later brought Karas to London, where the musician spent six weeks working with Reed on the score.[20] Decades later, film critic Roger Ebert wrote, "Has there ever been a film where the music more perfectly suited the action than in Carol Reed's The Third Man?"

[...]


CAST:

* Joseph Cotten as Holly Martins
* Alida Valli as Anna Schmidt
* Orson Welles as Harry Lime
* Trevor Howard as Major Calloway
* Bernard Lee as Sgt. Paine
* Wilfrid Hyde-White as Crabbin
* Erich Ponto as Dr. Winkel
* Ernst Deutsch as 'Baron' Kurtz
* Siegfried Breuer as Popescu
* Paul Hörbiger as Karl, Harry's Porter
* Hedwig Bleibtreu as Anna's Landlady
* Robert Brown as British Military Policeman in Sewer Chase
* Alexis Chesnakov as Brodsky
* Herbert Halbik as Hansl
* Paul Hardtmuth as the Hall Porter at Sacher's
* Geoffrey Keen as British Military Policeman
* Eric Pohlmann as Waiter at Smolka's
* Annie Rosar as the Porter's Wife
* Joseph Cotten as the Narrator (pre-1999 US version)
* Carol Reed as the Narrator (pre-1999 UK, and all post-'99 versions)

[...]


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All entries to "The Third Man" on soup.io are bundled via
http://02mydafsoup-01.soup.io/tag/3Mann_110516

May 20 2011

02mydafsoup-01

May 16 2011

Ballet mecanique (1924) Fernand Leger, Dudley Murphy, George Antheil - offene Ablage: nothing to hide

2 youtube videos (~16min)

[....]

As an enthusiast of the modern, Léger was greatly attracted to cinema, and for a time he considered giving up painting for filmmaking. In 1923–24 he designed the set for the laboratory scene in Marcel L'Herbier's L'Inhumaine (The Inhuman One). In 1924, in collaboration with Dudley Murphy, George Antheil, and Man Ray, Léger produced and directed the iconic and Futurism-influenced film, Ballet Mécanique (Mechanical Ballet). Neither abstract nor narrative, it is a series of images of a woman's lips and teeth, close-up shots of ordinary objects, and repeated images of human activities and machines in rhythmic movement.

[....]

cited from:
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Fernand_L%C3%83%C2%A9ger

cf.:
a) https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Ballet_Mecanique
b) http://thesoundofeye.blogspot.com/2010/06/fernand-leger-dudley-murphy-ballet.html


at scoop.it via permalink

Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa


The Third Man - Classic Film Noir available to watch in full on (YouTube - no more available, account closed due to copyright infringement) e.g. dailymotion

Carol Reed’s Classic Film Noir Thriller. An American pulp writer arrives in post-WWII Vienna only to find that the friend who waited for him is killed under mysterious circumstances. The ensuing mystery entangles him in his friend’s involvement in the black market, with the multinational police, and with his Czech girlfriend.

From openculture:

Graham Greene wrote the screenplay; Orson Welles played a starring role; and Carol Reed, an Oscar-winning filmmaker, sat in the director’s chair. A recipe for a classic noir film, to be sure. And the movie didn’t disappoint.

The Third Man won the Grand Prix at the 1949 Cannes Film Festival and an Academy Award for Best Black and White Cinematography in 1950. A half century later, The Third Man proved that it stands the test of time when the British Film Institute named it the best British film of the 20th century. Quite a statement.


The Third Man, 1949 - Wikipedia entry in EN / DE

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Film and music for "The Third Man" (1949) on soup.io are bundled by tags!

Reposted fromStellaVista StellaVista

May 15 2011

Play fullscreen

Ballet mecanique (1924) Fernand Leger - Part 1 (by Andyfshito)

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// oAnth

Youtube permalink

yt-user: Andyfshito

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Reposted fromcreamneuron creamneuron
Play fullscreen

Ballet mecanique (1924) Fernand Leger - Part 2 (by Andyfshito)

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//oAnth

Youtube permalink

yt-user: Andyfshito

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FERNAND LÉGER & DUDLEY MURPHY
BALLET MÉCANIQUE (1924)


blog - thesoundofeye.blogspot 2010



Directors: Fernand Léger & Dudley Murphy
Year: 1924
Time: 17 mins
Music:
George Antheil
Paul Lehrmann

Eye of Sound: It's difficult to make a brief description of such a historically charged film, so I'll just mention a few facts about the version presented here. Ballet Mécanique was jointly conceived by Dadaist painter and filmmaker Fernand Léger and Futurist composer George Antheil. Legend has it that Antheil's score was technically impossible to execute at the time: among other "oddities", it demanded sixteen synchronized pianos when there was no technology available to synchronize so many instruments at a time. Antheil rearranged it and added live piano players, but its American première turned out to be a disaster, with riots and all. The score was abandoned and for many decades every attempt to perform it bumped into the problem of synchronizing the pianos. Finally, in the 90s, after the discovery of the complete cut for Ballet Mécanique, Paul Lehrmann used modern MIDI technology to synchronize the piano section, thus "restoring" the score and allowing today's viewers to watch Ballet Mécanique as it was conceived. As far as I know, this is the only version which included the original George Antheil score.





Reposted fromcreamneuron creamneuron

May 13 2011

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