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July 01 2011

Matti Suuronen’s Futuro at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

In 2007, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam / Netherlands came into possession of the prototype of a quite spectacular piece of architecture: Finnish architect Matti Suuronen’s Futuro: house of the future.

With its distinctive flying saucer like shape Suuronen’s Futuro is an icon of 1960s design. In 1965 Matti Suuronen was commissioined to design a mobile holiday home that could be erected in poorly accessible skiing areas. The Futuro is made from polyester, measures about 3 x 8 meters, and was conceived for serial production. In part due to the oil crisis of 1973 the production was halted prematurely, but there are still a dozens of Futuros spread across the world.

The Futuro is now on display for the first time after its restoration at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen as centerpiece of the exhibition Futuro – Constructing Utopia, which also presents twenty prints and approximately a hundred design objects from the museum’s collection.

On the occasion of the opening of the exhibition Futuro – Constructing Utopia at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen VernissageTV met up with Jonieke van Es. She is Head of Collections & Research at the museum and tells us more about the history and concept of the Futuro, how the prototype came into possession of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen and how it was restored, the Futuro’s relevance as a design icon, and its future use at the museum.

PS: Another Futuro is being restored currently at the University of Canberra.

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January 24 2011

Afterimages of Life. Władysław Strzemiński and Rights for Art / ms2, Łódź, Poland

Jarosław Lubiak, curator of the exhhibition “Afterimages of life. Władysław Strzemiński and rights for art” at ms2, Łódź, Poland, explains the work of Władysław Strzemiński (1893-1952), one of the most important polish avant-garde artist. Strzemiński was a painter, designer, theoritican and teacher. The theory of Unism, which he created, was an importand contribution to the history of art of 20th century.

Strzemiński wrote many articles and books. His most important publications include: Unism in Painting (1928); Space Composition. Time – Space Rythm and its Calculations (1931) ; Theory of Vision (1958), written together with his wife, Katarzyna Kobro.

The curators invited German artist, Katja Strunz, to create the exhibition space. Thanks to her intervention in the shape of the architecture of the exhibition, we are given a new commentary to the works of Strzemiński.

Afterimages of Life is the first monographic exhibition of the artist in the period of the last 17 years. Its objective is the re-interpretation of Władysław Strzemiński’s works and placing them in the context of contemporary world.

Afterimages of life. Władysław Strzemiński and rights for art / ms2 Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz, Poland. Interview and video by Ania Ejsmont.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.

Tags: Powidoki życia. Władysław Strzemiński i prawa dla sztuki Unizm w malarstwie Teoria widzenia Kompozycja przestrzeni i obliczenia rytmu czasoprzestrzennego Muzeum Sztuki w Łodzi Łódz


March 24 2010

Interview with Designer Yves Béhar / Part 2/2: One Laptop Per Child and other projects

Industrial designer Yves Béhar is know for his engagement in the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project. For OLPC he designed the XO laptop. In the second part of the interview with Yves Béhar at Baselworld 2010, he gives us an update on the OLPC project and talks about his work, the future of design and the role design can play in making the world a better place, and the projects he is working on at the moment.

Born in Switzerland in 1967. Graduated from Art Center College of Design. Established his design studio, fuseproject in 1999. He brings a humanistic approach to his work with the goal of creating projects that are deeply in-tune with the needs of a sustainable future. He also combines technological innovation with design. His major work includes the XO laptop for OLPC (One Laptop Per Child), LEAF LED light for Herman Miller, and “Jawbone” Bluetooth headset for Aliph. His innovative designs have garnered more than 150 awards, and his work is in the permanent collections of museums including the Centre Pompidou, MoMA, the Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich and The Art Institute of Chicago.

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March 23 2010

Interview with Designer Yves Béhar / Part 1/2: Issey Miyake Watch Series VUE

On the occasion of the presentation of Seiko’s Issey Miyake watch series VUE at Baselworld 2010 in Basel, Switzerland, VernissageTV met with the designer of the watch, Yves Béhar.

In the first part of the interview, Yves Béhar talks about the new Issey Miyake watch series called VUE: the basic idea, the materials, and shows us the watch and an animation that visualizes the concept behind VUE.
In the second part of the interview, Yves Béhar talks about his work and his studios in New York and San Francisco, his involvement in the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project for which he designed the XO laptop, the future of design and the role design can play in making the world a better place, and the projects he is working on at the moment.

The complete interview is also available on our HD page.

Since 2001, under the direction of ISSEY MIYAKE, Seiko Instruments Inc. has collaborated with designers such as Shunji Yamanaka, Harri Koskinen, Tokujin Yoshioka, Naoto Fukasawa and Ross Lovegrove. This time, Yves Béhar was commissioned to design a new watch series.

Designer Statement by Yves Béhar: “A watch is a Mindset about the idea of time. When considering reading the time of day, my main question is: why do I need to see all twelve numbers when only one is needed? The watch’s unique approach is to present one number appearing only, while the previous hour slowly fades out of view, and the next one fades into view. This magical appearance reminds me of the time just passed, and the future incoming…it says, ‘time is precious, yet always presents us with a surprise ahead. The mindset of the watch is to let the mystery of time be experienced: the watch is a way to feel time’s appearance and disappearance in our lives. By seeing only the current hour, while the last hour representing the past and the next one representing the future subtly fade in and out, we can live a new view of time.”

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