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March 18 2012

02mydafsoup-01

April 21 2011

April 09 2011

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undr:

Brassaï

Pissoir

Paris, 1932

From Brassaï, Paris

(via liquidnight)

Reposted fromjohnstaedler johnstaedler

March 25 2011

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plandrea:

Happy Birthday, Manhattan Street Grid!

Two hundred years ago today, city commissioners certified the Manhattan street grid, spurring development by ensuring 7 miles of regular street access.

When the 2000-block grid was approved, urbanized Manhattan ended at Greenwich Village. Areas north were farmland and unsettled areas.

When the street grid was designed, planners anticipated that New York, then a city of 40,000 people, would grow up to 34th Street and have a population of 400,000 over the next 50 years. By 1860, Manhattan had already grown to 800,000 and continued to grow uptown. 

The street grid was chosen because officials thought that the consistent 90 degree angles, dissimilar from the narrow crooked streets downtown, would discourage the spread of fire and disease.

The grid made the city more egalitarian, carving out lots (mostly 25 by 100 feet) available for purchase. Roland Barthes, the 20th-century French philosopher, wrote: “This is the purpose of New York’s geometry. That each individual should be poetically the owner of the capital of the world.”

Today, City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden celebrates the block: “The 200-foot-long block is short enough to provide continuous diversity for the pedestrian, and the tradition of framing out the grid by building to the street-wall makes New York streets walkable and vibrant.” 

Quotes from NYT

March 21 2011

March 08 2011

02mydafsoup-01

March 07 2011

02mydafsoup-01

March 05 2011

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afuzz:

Linda Vista Theatre, Mexico City

S.C. Lee, architect

Description: As built the circular front kiosk and tower perform the function of advertising the theatre as a destination and display the posters for shows to passersby.

Date: 1942

Reposted fromStellaVista StellaVista
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walkingliberty:

I would consider relocating to Jackson if it meant I could work in this building.

decoarchitecture:

Greyhound Bus Station, Jackson, Mississippi
from Roadside Architecture: Greyhound Bus Stations

Side view of Jackson’s old bus station — now an architecture firm’s office. The architect saved the building!

From the site:

The Jackson station was built from 1937-1938. This is the only station that Arrasmith designed with a structural glass faced exterior. Originally, the interior had a coffee shop with a horseshoe-shaped counter. The men’s room had a shower, while the women’s room had a bath tub. It was condemned when architect Robert Parker Adams bought the building in 1988. He restored it as office space for his architectural firm. This station is also part of desegregation history. Freedom Riders were arrested here for using white restrooms and waiting rooms.

Reposted fromjohnstaedler johnstaedler

March 03 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Amiens Cathedral, 1220-1288 – French gothic carved wood chair stalls
Original Collection: Arthur Peck Photograph Collection (P99)

Item Number: P099_A_144

Restrictions: Permission to use must be obtained from the OSU Archives.

Click here to view our digital collections.

Click here to view Oregon State University's other digital collections.

We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons; however, certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version may apply. To read more about what “no known restrictions” means, please visit the OSU Archives website.
02mydafsoup-01
Stratham Park, [NH] – [Herts? Hants?]
Original Collection: Arthur Peck Photograph Collection (P99)

Item Number: P099_D_346

Restrictions: Permission to use must be obtained from the OSU Archives.

Click here to view our digital collections.

Click here to view Oregon State University's other digital collections.

We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons; however, certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version may apply. To read more about what “no known restrictions” means, please visit the OSU Archives website.

February 27 2011

02mydafsoup-01

May 24 2010

Als die Männer noch Hüte trugen

Im Jahr 1949 fotografierte ein Mann namens Chalmers Butterfield das Straßenleben in London in der tiefen Farbenfülle von Kodachrome. Drüben bei How To Be A Retronaut, wo solche raren Funde gesammelt werden, gibt es zwei weitere Aufnahmen von Mr. Butterfield.

(Gefunden bei neatorama)

Hierzu siehe auch:

Farbfilmaufnahmen: London in den zwanziger Jahren |

Reposted fromglaserei glaserei

April 30 2010

02mydafsoup-01

April 26 2010

02mydafsoup-01

April 25 2010

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i12bent:

Robert Delaunay painted the Eiffel Tower again and again, in all the styles he progressed through - see: 1 2 3

Delaunay: Tour Eiffel et Jardin du Champs de Mars, 1922 - oil on canvas (The Hirschhorn)

Reposted fromreckon reckon
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