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December 27 2012

02mydafsoup-01
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Es hat sich halt eröffnet, das himmlische Tor ( Now as has been opened the heavenly gate) - YouTube - Tiroler Weihnachtslied - Tyrolian Christmas Song ( no English translation available - lyrics in Tyrolian [Austria and Northern Italy] dialect - belongs to the German-Bavarian dialect group )

yt-permalink

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http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/text5728.html

Es hat sich halt eröffnet, das himmlische Tor
die Engelein, die kugalan ganz haufenweis hervor
die Bubalan, die Madalan, die mach'n Purzigagalan
bald aufi bald abi, bald hin und bald her
bald unterschi bald überschi, das freut sie umso mehr
Halleluja, halleluja, alle, alle, alleluja

Jetzt håb ma hålt dås himmlische Gwammel erblickt
es håt uns Gott Våter an Botn zuagschickt
Wir sollten uns vereinen zum Kindlein auf die Roas
verlåssn unsre Öchslan, die Kälber und die Goaß
verlåssn unsre Öchslan, die Kälber und die Goaß

Åft sein mir nåcher gången, i und du a,
kerzengråd nåch Bethlehem, juchheißa, hopsassa.
Seppele, du Schlanggele, nimm du dei gmöstes Lampele,
und Michl, du a Henn, und Jost, du an Håhn,
und i nimm mei foasts Fakkele und renn damit davon

Geh, Veitl, mir wöllen die Gscheitern hålt sein
Wir betn 's Kindlan ån im Ochsenkrippelein
Büabale, wås mågst denn håbn, mågst eppa dechta unsre Gåbn?
Mågst Äpfl oder Birn, oder Nussn oder Kas
willst Zwötschgen oder Pflaumen oder sist a sölles Gfraß?

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Text und Musik: Die erste Strophe dieses Liedes zeichnete Karl Liebleitner (1858–1942) im Jahre 1898 vom Druckereibesitzer Hans Mößmer in Wien auf. Erstmals veröffentlicht wurde es von Franz Friedrich Kohl und Josef Reiter in der Sammlung Echte Tiroler Lieder, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1913, S. 1. Die weitere Strophen finden sich u.a. in Alpenrose (1924, dort als Volkslied aus Tirol )

November 23 2012

02mydafsoup-01
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Georg Friedrich Händel (1685-1759)

Neun deutsche Arien - Nine German Arias

Lyrics from: Barthold Heinrich Brockes (1680-1747)

Lyrics in German and English: see pdf at pp 16-17 or via links given in the song index at the  bottom.


[...]

Handel's "nine German arias" (he wrote other arias in German, but this is a discrete group) were written in the mid-1720s, long after the composer left his native Germany for Italy and then booming Great Britain. It is not known why he should have written music in German at that late date, and the pieces have a quietly contented tone that sets them somewhat apart from almost everything else in Handel's oeuvre. The texts are by Hamburg poet Barthold Heinrich Brockes, whose so-called Brockes-Passion had already been set by Handel a decade earlier. They are religious but not exactly sacred -- spiritual in a personal way, perhaps, with a good deal of nature imagery that is only lightly reflected in the music. Instead Handel sticks to the da capo aria pattern, forging a gentle language for the soprano soloist that evokes the outlines of the Italian operatic aria but tones the whole thing down to chamber dimensions.

[...]

cited from answers.com




*Neun deutsche Arien (Nine German arias)







St. Cecilia's Day - 22nd of November
- Catholic Encyclopedia
- Wikipedia


May 04 2011

02mydafsoup-01

April 04 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Brahms, Vier ernste Gesänge (1/2)
(Quatre chants sérieux-four serious songs) op. 121,

Hans Hotter & Gerald Moore Piano,
rec, 11 & 12-11 1951, London.

I: Denn es gehet dem menschen,
II: ich wandte mich um und sahe an alle,

-------------------------------------

Youtube permalink
yt-account: jacquesurlus
02mydafsoup-01

Vier ernste Gesänge - Four Serious Songs, for voice & piano - Johannes Brahms, op. 121 | Information from Answers.com

   
On March 26, 1896, Brahms' lifelong friend and champion, Clara Schumann, suffered a stroke. Brahms, who considered Clara to be the "greatest wealth" in his life, was deeply shocked and forced to confront the fact that she might soon die. To cope, he immersed himself in work, completing the Vier ernste Gesänge (Four Serious Songs), Op. 121, by his birthday, May 7, 1896.

Brahms compiled the texts for the Vier ernste Gesänge from Martin Luther's translation of the Bible -- mostly passages from the apocryphon, Ecclesiastes. The four songs represent a progression of thought about, and reaction to, death, and by virtue of their subject hardly require the adjective, "serious." Appearing after a decade in which the composer wrote no original songs, these four songs are truly unique in Brahms' output: they show no trace of folksong influence, they are not in strophic form, and they occasionally adopt a harsh, dramatic quality that is quite beyond his other songs. Brahms refused to have them performed, suggesting that they were of great personal importance to him.

"Denn es gehet dem Menschen" (It is for a person [as it is for an animal]), from Ecclesiastes 3:19-22, focuses on the transience of life. The text notes that people, just like animals, must die. In D minor, Brahms' setting conveys this transience through changes in tempo, meter and texture. The song proceeds with a turning melody, never leaving D minor; a quiet shift to a 3/4 meter and Allegro tempo bring with it denser and more complex harmonies, climaxing with the appearance of a new texture and the question, "Who knows if the soul of a person rises upward?". "Ich wandte mich und sahe an alle" (I turned and looked upon everyone), sets Ecclesiastes 4:1-3. The opening notes, over a stumbling accompaniment, anticipate the beginning of the next song. This is the most recitative-like of the four songs.

The text for "O Tod, o Tod, wie bitter bist du" comes from Ecclesiastes 41:1-2; Brahms alters the opening text, "O Tod, wie bitter bist du" (O death, how bitter you are) to "O Tod, wie wohl tust du dem Dürftigen" (O death, how good you are to the poor) when it returns for the second time. A musical metamorphosis accompanies this textual one, reflecting a shift in attitude from the bleak to the reassuring. Death, although final, alleviates suffering. The fourth and final song, "Wenn ich mit Menschen- und mit Engelzungen redete" (If I speak with the tongues of humans of angels), is drawn from 1 Corinthians 13; it is both a paean to, and a eulogy for, love. ~ John Palmer, Rovi

May 01 2010

02mydafsoup-01

Frühlingssehnsucht - Franz Schubert 1797-1828






Frühlingssehnsucht, Franz Schubert 1797-1828

Werner Güra, Tenor
Christoph Berner, Piano

yt permalink
yt account: Ablacsia

Text by Ludwig Rellstab (1799-1860)
Liedtext / song text with several translations EN, FR, ...
via http://www.recmusic.org



"Frühlingssehnsucht", D. 957 no. 3 (1828), from Schwanengesang, no. 3.

Säuselnde Lüfte wehend so mild
Blumiger Düfte atmend erfüllt!
Wie haucht ihr mich wonnig begrüßend an!
Wie habt ihr dem pochenden Herzen getan?
Es möchte euch folgen auf luftiger Bahn!
Wohin?

Bächlein, so munter rauschend zumal,
Wollen hinunter silbern ins Tal.
Die schwebende Welle, dort eilt sie dahin!
Tief spiegeln sich Fluren und Himmel darin.
Was ziehst du mich, sehnend verlangender Sinn,
Hinab?

Grüßender Sonne spielendes Gold,
Hoffende Wonne bringest du hold!
Wie labt mich dein selig begrüßendes Bild!
Es lächelt am tiefblauen Himmel so mild
Und hat mir das Auge mit Tränen gefüllt!
Warum?

Grünend umkränzet Wälder und Höh'!
Schimmernd erglänzet Blütenschnee!
So dränget sich alles zum bräutlichen Licht;
Es schwellen die Keime, die Knospe bricht;
Sie haben gefunden, was ihnen gebricht:
Und du?

Rastloses Sehnen! Wünschendes Herz,
Immer nur Tränen, Klage und Schmerz?
Auch ich bin mir schwellender Triebe bewußt!
Wer stillet mir endlich die drängende Lust?
Nur du befreist den Lenz in der Brust,
Nur du!

March 28 2010

02mydafsoup-01

3 Interpretations of the 'Lullaby'-Romance by P. Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) - Op. 16, No. 1

1) Arthur Kondrashenkov (13 years old) & Sergey Zhilkin, piano - Lullaby (P. Tchaikovsky)

- youtube account:kbchoir | permalink

2) Tchaikovsky - Rachmaninoff: Lullaby Op. 16, No. 1

- youtube account: truecrypt | permalink

3) Galina Vishnevskaya sings beautiful romance "Lullaby" by P. Tchaikovsky.

- youtube account: ManricoV | permalink



February 07 2010

02mydafsoup-01

September 15 2009

02mydafsoup-01
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Elizabethan Music

"Come Again",
composed by John Dowland,
interpreted by counter-tenor Russel Oberlin (Rec ~late 50ies)
_____________________________________________


"Come Again"
Come again, sweet love doth now invite.
Thy graces that refrain, to do me due delight.
To see, to hear, to touch, to kiss, to die,
with thee again in sweetest sympathy.

Come again, that I may cease to mourn.
Through thy unkind disdain, for now left and forlorn.
I sit, I sigh, I weep, I faint, I die,
in deadly pain and endless misery.

All the day, the sun that lends me shine,
By frowns do cause me pine, and feeds me with delay.
Her smiles, my springs, that makes, my joys, to grow,
her frowns the winters of my woe.

All the night, my sleeps are full of dreams,
My eyes are full of streams, my heart takes no delight.
To see, the fruits, and joys, that some, do find,
and mark the storms are me assigned.

Out alas, my faith is ever true.
Yet will she never rue, nor yield me any grace.
Her eyes, of fire, her heart, of flint, is made,
whom tears nor truth may once invade.

Gentle love, draw forth thy wounding dart.
Thou canst not pierce her heart, for I that do approve.
By sighs, and tears, more hot, than are, thy shafts,
did tempt while she for triumph laughs.
_____________________________________________

München/ Munich, 2009-09-15

offene Ablage - nothing to hide
on twitter: @02mytwi01

April 03 2009

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Elizabethan Music

John Dowland (1563-1626)

The First Book of Songs (1597)

XVII. "Come again"

Russell Oberlin - Countertenor

Joseph Iadone - Lute

rec ~ late 50ies

Text:

XVII
Come again, sweet love doth now invite.
Thy graces that refrain, to do me due delight.
To see, to hear, to touch, to kiss, to die,
with thee again in sweetest sympathy.

Come again, that I may cease to mourn.
Through thy unkind disdain, for now left and forlorn.
I sit, I sigh, I weep, I faint, I die,
in deadly pain and endless misery.

All the day, the sun that lends me shine,
By frowns do cause me pine, and feeds me with delay.
Her smiles, my springs, that makes, my joys, to grow,
her frowns the winters of my woe.

All the night, my sleeps are full of dreams,
My eyes are full of streams, my heart takes no delight.
To see, the fruits, and joys, that some, do find,
and mark the storms are me assigned.

Out alas, my faith is ever true.
Yet will she never rue, nor yield me any grace.
Her eyes, of fire, her heart, of flint, is made,
whom tears nor truth may once invade.

Gentle love, draw forth thy wounding dart.
Thou canst not pierce her heart, for I that do approve.
By sighs, and tears, more hot, than are, thy shafts,
did tempt while she for triumph laughs.


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