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May 24 2013

Paul McCarthy: Life Cast / Hauser & Wirth New York 69th Street

Hauser & Wirth’s entire spring program in New York City is devoted to the artist Paul McCarthy. At Hauser & Wirth’s venue at 69th Street, the gallery presents Paul McCarthy: Life Cast, featuring platinum silicone life casts of the artist and Elyse Poppers, one of the key performers in his most recent projects Rebel Dabble Babble and WS. The exhibition runs until July 26, 2013.

Paul McCarthy: Life Cast / Hauser & Wirth New York 69th Street. Press preview, May 10, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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Excerpt from the press release:

‘Paul McCarthy: Life Cast’

Also opening to the public on 10 May at Hauser & Wirth’s townhouse on 69th Street, ‘Paul McCarthy: Life Cast’ (on view through 26 July) showcases highly developed themes and narratives coursing through and connecting different areas of McCarthy’s vast and complex practice. Here those themes are revealed through platinum silicone life casts – bravura replicas of the artist and Elyse Poppers, one of the key performers in his most recent projects ‘Rebel Dabble Babble’ and ‘WS’.

‘Horizontal’ (2013) is a haunting depiction of the artist in uncanny full-scale replica, naked and prone in the gallery’s skylit ground floor south room. ‘Horizontal’ is a recent ‘repetition-variation’ of the 2005 work ‘Paul Dreaming, Vertical, Horizontal’, in which the artist’s own body was molded standing upright. Defined by gravity’s pull, that earlier sculpture was half-clothed and subtly distorted, its belly and penis distended outward. While ‘Paul Dreaming’ elicits thoughts of death, it also suggests that the artist is very much alive and a bit of a bearded buffoon in socks and shirt, but no pants. ‘Horizontal’ presents an altogether different avatar and, in the artist’s words, ‘makes no bones about the fact this is someone dead, without the mask of a clown or the possibility of sleep and dreaming’. Cast with McCarthy in a prone position, this morgue-like caricature strikes a subversive note in which absurdity and pathos echo one another.

‘Horizontal’ was presaged by one of McCarthy’s earliest exhibited works, the hollow metal ‘Dead H’ (1968), also on view in ‘Paul McCarthy: Life Cast’. ‘Dead H’ – at first glance a Minimalist sculpture in the then-prevailing style – slyly mimics a dead body (and, coincidentally, a toppled twin of the first letter in Los Angeles’ famous Hollywood sign).

An ironic comment upon vanitas and the ambitions and fables of art and culture, McCarthy’s ‘Dead H’ is a fallen hero. Forty-five years later, the artist’s study of the body as a vehicle for liberation and exploitation continues full force. Works on view at 69th Street also include ‘Rubber Jacket Horizontal, Rubber H’, a poignant fragment from the life casting activities of the past year that captures a sunken and hollow portion of the artist’s own torso.

‘Paul McCarthy: Life Cast’ also presents four female figures of uncanny verisimilitude. All are life casts of Elyse Poppers achieved through a series of painstaking processes at the leading edge of special effects technology. ‘T.G. Awake’ (T.G. is an acronym for ‘That Girl’ and refers to another feminine icon, aspiring actress namesake of a hit 1960s situation comedy) is comprised of three life-sized casts of the actress in similar sitting positions, with her legs spread open to varying degrees and eyes cast in different directions. Together these static variations reference the magical effect by which a series of still images can be joined together to become film. ‘T.G. Awake’ found its origins in drawings that McCarthy made of his wife Karen in the 1960s and relates to the first White Snow pencil drawings of 2009. The sculpture ‘T.G. Asleep’ presents the same woman prone, her body curved and hands cupped, a counterpoint to the dead figure of ‘Horizontal’.

The exhibition also includes ‘That Girl’, a four-channel video installation based in the process by which ‘T.G. Awake’ and ‘T.G. Asleep’ were achieved. Capturing the molding process, the model’s live movement studies, and the documentation of these through deliberately positioned cameras, this work brings viewers into the action through which the sculptures on view were made. ‘Life casting liberates the literal through a kind of unifying monotone,’ McCarthy has said. ‘It creates a different representation of the original thing that lets me explore where reality and abstraction intersect’.

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May 22 2013

Frieze New York Art Fair 2013

This video provides you with a walk through Frieze New York Art Fair 2013, the second edition of the fair on Randall’s Island.

Frieze New York art fair 2013, Randall’s Island, New York, May 10, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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May 21 2013

Pulse Art Fair New York 2013

Pulse is another art fair that chose to run concurrently to Frieze New York instead of Armory Show. Among the galleries participating in the fair at the Metropolitan Pavilion are Ethan Cohen (New York), Stefan Roepke (Cologne), Tokyo Gallery + BATP (Tokyo), z2o Galleria Sara Zanin (Rome). This video provides you with a walkthrough of the fair.

Pulse New York, The Metropolitan Pavilion, New York, May 9, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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May 16 2013

Random International: Rain Room / Museum of Modern Art MoMA, New York

After its premiere at the Barbican Centre in London in October 2012, Random International’s Rain Room is now installed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Follow us inside: it’s raining, but you won’t get wet (promised).

Random International’s immersive environment Rain Room is a major component of the MoMA PS1 exhibition EXPO 1: New York. The installation is presented in the lot directly adjacent to The Museum of Modern Art. Simply put, Rain Room is a field of falling water that pauses wherever a human body is detected. Thus, Rain Room offers visitors the experience of controlling the rain. “The work invites visitors to explore the roles that science, technology, and human ingenuity can play in stabilizing our environment. Using digital technology, Rain Room creates a carefully choreographed downpour, simultaneously encouraging people to become performers on an unexpected stage and creating an intimate atmosphere of contemplation.” Watch also our video covering the presentation of Rain Room at The Curve, Barbican Center and our interview with the founders of Random International, Stuart Wood, Florian Ortkrass and Hannes Koch.

Random International’s Rain Room turned out to be a lot of fun for the visitors, but it’s also a very complex installation. It consists of injection moulded tiles, solenoid valves, pressure regulators, 3D tracking cameras, wooden frames, steel beams, a hydraulic management system, and a grated floor. The system is controlled by custom software.

Random International are known for their digital-based contemporary art. The London-based studio creates artworks and installations that explore behaviour and interaction.

rAndom International: Rain Room. Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York. May 10, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

For more videos featuring Random International click here!

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Random International was founded in 2005 by Stuart Wood, Florian Ortkrass and Hannes Koch. They first met when they were students at the Royal College of Art in London. The studio is based in a converted warehouse in Chelsea, London. Random International have exhibited at art fairs, museums and biennials with works and installations such as Pixelroller, Temporary Graffiti, Audience, Study For A Mirror, Swarm Light, Self Portrait, Temporary Light Printing Machine, and Rain Room. The presentation of Rain Room at The Museum of Modern Art is the U.S. premiere of this environment. The piece debuted at Barbican Centre, London, in October 2012.

Photo set:

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May 10 2013

Cutlog New York Art Fair 2013

After four successful years in Paris, France, Cutlog art fair launches its first New York edition. The fair runs from May 10-13, 2013. Cutlog New York focuses on showing cutting-edge and established galleries that promote the work of contemporary artists. The fair features 45 galleries and curators that present art, installations, performances, talks, and projections. As part of the outdoor projections program that runs from 8pm – Midnight, Cutlog presents New York Close Up Is Now with simultaneous screeings of Art21′s New York Close Up, Noah Becker’s New York Is Now, and VernissageTV’s Around the World in one go.

Cutlog New York is located in a former public school in Manhattan’s Lower East Side (107 Suffolk Street). In this video, we attend the preview of the fair on May 9, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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Ideas City StreetFest, New Museum, New York

Ideas City is a four-day, biennial festival of conferences, workshops, and an streetfest in New York. Ideas City was founded by the New Museum in 2011. It’s a major collaborative initiative between hundreds of arts, education, and community organizations. Ideas City explores the future of cities around the globe with a focus on arts and culture. The 2013′s theme was Untapped Capital, focusing on resources that are under-recognized or underutilized in our cities. In this video, we attend the Ideas City StreetFest on 4th May, 2013 and have a look at what ideas artists, architects, poets, technologists, and other creative people have to shape their city.

Ideas City StreetFest, New Museum, New York. May 4, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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May 08 2013

Tracey Emin: I Followed You To The Sun / Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York

Tracey Emin: I Followed You To The Sun is a solo show and two-part exhibition at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in New York that features over 100 works of art. The show includes series of new bronze sculptures, paintings, drawings, embroideries, and a short film.

A series of seven bronze sculptures is the centerpiece of Tracey Emin’s newest exhibition. The artist created the sculptures over the past year at the Long Island foundry used by Louise Bourgeois, with whom Emin had collaborated before her death in 2010. Each bronze is engraved with the artist’s poetic confessions. Like ancient sarcophagi, are adorned with tiny animal figurines and hand-sculpted human figures.

Tracey Emin: I Followed You To The Sun, Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York. Opening reception, May 2, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

PS: Watch our coverage of Tracey Emin’s big retrospective at Kunstmuseum Bern, Tracey Emin – 20 Years.

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Press text:

Lehmann Maupin is honored to present Tracey Emin’s fifth solo show in New York from 2 May to 22 June 2013. Tracey Emin: I Followed You To The Sun is a two-part exhibition featuring over 100 works of art, including a series of new bronze sculptures, paintings and drawings, embroideries, and a short film. Lehmann Maupin has published a special artist monograph on the occasion of the exhibition. The gallery will host a book signing with the artist at 201 Chrystie Street on Wednesday, 1 May from 5 to 7 PM. The following evening, on Thursday, 2 May, Tracey Emin will be present for opening receptions at 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street from 6 to 8 PM.

Regarded as one of the world’s most significant contemporary artists, Tracey Emin is internationally recognized for her blunt and revealing style, which elicits a broad range of emotions from shock to empathy to self-reflection. Drawing on personal experiences, Emin often reveals emotional situations with brutal honesty and poetic humor in a wide variety of media including painting, drawing, embroidery, neon, installation, sculpture, and film. This sprawling, two-part exhibition covers all aspects of Emin’s creative output and continues to reveal her most intimate internal narratives.

The centerpiece of Emin’s newest exhibition is a series of seven bronze sculptures that she created over the past year at the Long Island foundry used by Louise Bourgeois, with whom Emin had collaborated before her death in 2010. Each bronze is engraved with the artist’s poetic confessions, and like ancient sarcophagi, are adorned with tiny animal figurines and hand-sculpted human figures.

At 201 Chrystie Street the focus is on a very personal collection of gouache on paper drawings entitled Lonely Chair drawings, which are the primary subject of the accompanying exhibition catalogue. In this series of self-portraits, Emin depicts a solitary female figure in her signature gestural style. The images are drawn from photographs Emin took of herself in France and convey poignant emotions of longing and sadness.

The show will also feature a short film entitled “Love Never Wanted Me.” The film follows a wild fox on the grounds of a secluded estate as Emin narrates a haunting account of the pain associated with fleeting love, saying at one point, “The broken heart is a lonely world and this is the love that I know.”

In December 2013, the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, will present the first solo museum exhibition devoted to Emin’s work in the United States. Curated by Bonnie Clearwater, the Museum’s Executive Director, Angel Without You will focus solely on Emin’s use of neon, a medium that she began utilizing in 1997. Since then, Emin’s illuminated confessions rendered in her personal handwriting have become widely regarded for their poignancy and the universality of her message. This past February, Emin debuted her first public project in New York’s Times Square, as part of Midnight Moment organized by s[edition], the Times Square Advertising Coalition, and Times Square Arts. Each night from 11:57 PM to Midnight, six of her most iconic neon messages were screened on the Times Square Jumbotrons in a silent and moving tribute to love.

Tracey Emin (b. 1963, London) was raised in the seaside town of Margate on the English coast. After leaving school at an early age, Emin enrolled at the Maidstone College of Art, Kent, to study printmaking. She continued her studies at the prestigious Royal College of Arts, London, where she earned a Master’s degree in painting. In 1999, Lehmann Maupin presented Tracey Emin’s first solo exhibition in the United States, Every Part of Me’s Bleeding. Following this critically acclaimed exhibition, Emin exhibited her infamous installation “My Bed” at the Tate Gallery, for which she was shortlisted for the Turner Prize. In 2007, she was chosen to represent Great Britain at the Venice Biennale, becoming the second female artist to ever do so. That same year, Emin was made a Royal Academician and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the Royal College of Art, a Doctor of Letters from the University of Kent and a Doctor of Philosophy from London Metropolitan University. In January 2013, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Emin a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for her contributions to the visual arts.

In recent years, Emin has been the subject of a number of retrospective museum exhibitions around the world, including a major solo show at the Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires, Argentina, which encompassed a collection of her early films (2012); She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea, a solo exhibition at Turner Contemporary in her hometown of Margate (2012); and Tracey Emin: 20 Years, the artist’s first retrospective which originated at Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2008), before traveling to the Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga (2008) and the Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland (2009).

Emin’s work can be found in many of the world’s most prestigious public collections, including the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo; Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; British Museum, London; Camden Arts Center, London; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Denver Art Museum; Garage Center for Contemporary Culture, Moscow; Hara Museum, Tokyo; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Portrait Gallery, London; Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Saatchi Collection, London; San Francisco Museum of Art; Tate Gallery, London; and Walker Art Centre, Minneapolis.

The artist lives and works in London, England.

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May 01 2013

Ugo Rondinone: Human Nature / Rockefeller Plaza, New York City

Human Nature by Swiss-born, New York-based artist Ugo Rondinone is a public art exhibition at the Rockefeller Plaza in Manhattan that was unveiled by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg last week. Human Nature consists of nine huge stone figures that are standing like ancient sentries along the full length of Rockefeller Plaza. The figures were assembled at Rockefeller Center over the course of several days. They range in height from 16 to 20 feet and weigh up to 30,000 pounds each. To created the figures, Ugo Rondinone used massive bluestone slabs. The stones were rough-cut into blocks and stacked on top of each other. The installation recalls a modern Stonehenge.

Ugo Rondinone was born in Brunnen, Switzerland, in 1962. He was master student under Ernst Caramelle at the Hochschule für angewandte Kunst (University of Applied Arts) in Vienna from 1985 until 1990. Since the late 1990s he lives in New York. Since 1985 Ugo Rondinone’s work has been included in numerous international solo and group exhibitions.

The new Public Art Fund exhibition opened on April 23 and is on view until June 7, 2013.

Ugo Rondinone: Human Nature. Rockefeller Plaza, New York City, April 22, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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April 22 2013

Mattia Bonetti: Indoor / Outdoor at Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

Indoor / Outdoor is the title of artist Mattia Bonetti’s current exhibition at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York. On view from 10 April – 4 May, 2013, the show presents new functional sculptures by Mattia Bonetti, including new outdoor furniture, a career first for the artist. Since the beginning of his career in the 1970s, Bonetti is known for his limited edition works and unique commissions that set art and design in a creative dialogue.

Mattia Bonetti was born in 1952 in Lugano, Switzerland. He currently lives and works in Paris. Mattia Bonetti’s work is included in numerous public collections, including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

Mattia Bonetti: Indoor Outdoor at Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, April 10, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

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March 27 2013

Alberto Burri: Black Cellotex. Luxembourg & Dayan, New York

Alberto Burri (1915-1995) was an Italian painter and sculptor. For his works, he used unusual materials such as tar, resin, and plastic cements in the attempt to expand the potential of painting. The gallery Luxembourg & Dayan in New York City is currently presenting a solo show with rare late works of Alberto Burri, titled Black Cellotex. The exhibition comprises a series of paintings made in the years between 1986 and 1987 , works that have never before been exhibited in the United States. For the works on display, Burri used Cellotex, a material the artist began using in the early 1950s as base for his paintings. Cellotex is an industrial particleboard made of compressed sawdust and glue. In 1975, Burri started to use the material not just as an invisible supporting ground for his paintings, but as his subject, exposing the material. Alberto Burri used knives and various hand-made instruments to sculpt the surface of Cellotex board, thus creating textured black-on-black forms. This video provides you with a walkthrough of the exhibition on the occasion of the press preview. Alberto Burri: Black Cellotex at Luxembourg & Dayan runs until April 20, 1013.

Alberto Burri: Black Cellotex. Luxembourg & Dayan, New York City. Press preview, March 7, 2013.

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March 25 2013

Interview with Duke Riley / Magnan Metz Gallery at The Armory Show 2013

Magnan Metz Gallery participated in The Armory Show 2013 with a solo presentation of New York-based artist Duke Riley. Riley is best known for “attacking” the cruise ship Queen Mary 2 with his self-built replica of America’s first submarine. For his solo show at The Armory Show 2013, he conceived a work that is closely related to Manhattan’s Pier 94, where the art fair takes place. VernissageTV had that chance to speak with Duke Riley, who talks about his show at the fair and his work in general.

Interview with Duke Riley / Magnan Metz Gallery at The Armory Show 2013.

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March 21 2013

Tom Duncan: Dedicated to Coney Island / Andrew Edlin Gallery at The Armory Show 2013

At The Armory Show 2013, Andrew Edlin Gallery exhibited a solo installation of Tom Duncan’s work Dedicated to Coney Island, a giant three-dimensional scene and vivid recreation of the amusement park. This recreation of the New York City landmark is based on Tom Duncan’s memories of growing up near Coney Island. The myriad details of the work show, among other things, the beach crowded with bathers, various amusement rides, a balloon, trains… By pushing buttons, the viewer can activate different moving parts of the work such as the Wonder Wheel and the trains. In this video, Andrew Edlin introduces us to the fantastical world of Tom Duncan, who was strongly influenced by his childhood in World War II Scotland and postwar New York.

Tom Duncan was born in 1939 in Shotts, Scotland. He emigrated to America in 1947. He studied at the Art Students League of New York and the National Academy of Design School of Fine Art.

Tom Duncan: Dedicated to Coney Island / Andrew Edlin Gallery at The Armory Show 2013. Introduction by Andrew Edlin, March 6, 2013.

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Info text:

At 73, Tom Duncan continues to create art based on his childhood memories. His process involves a repeated and painful return to his family’s home in war-torn Scotland where he was born a few months before the outbreak of World War Two. Duncan grew up in an unpredictable world of bomb shelters, blackout curtains, rations, family strife, and a nearby German prisoner of war camp. His oeuvre extends far beyond wartime Scotland, to include his emigration to America in 1947. For Duncan, remembrance is not simply recollection or nostalgia, but more an invitation to conjure up the past–people, places, and events–the result of which amounts to nothing less than their virtual reincarnation.

Duncan’s signature constellation of visual and thematic concerns are fully realized in several outstanding masterworks, of which the most notable to date is Dedicated to Coney Island. Having recently been on extended loan to Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum, this giant three-dimensional scene is a vivid, fantastical recreation of the fabled New York City landmark, complete with moving parts. Conceived from the eyes of a child but with the mastery of an adult artist, Coney Island features real and imagined attractions. Beloved rides are set in motion such as the Wonder Wheel as well angels, devils, colorful bathers, and the elevated subway behind.

At a time when a kind of cultural amnesia seems to be the order of the day, in which young people lack real experience with war, and in which the diverse richness of places like Coney Island are being replaced by the corporate aesthetic of Disney, Duncan’s work functions as an important record of the way the world once was.

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March 15 2013

Rita Ackermann: Negative Muscle / Hauser & Wirth New York

Rita Ackermann’s current solo exhibition at Hauser & Wirth New York is the artist’s first exhibition with the gallery in New York. The show is titled Negative Muscle and presents seventeen paintings made between the years of 2010 and 2013. It shows Rita Ackermann’s evolution over the past three years and takes its title from the first painting Ackermann made following a collaboration with filmmaker Harmony Korine. The centerpiece of the exhibition is a group of six new paintings from the series Fire by Days. Rita Ackermann was born in 1968 in Budapest, Hungary. She currently lives and works in New York. In this video we attend the press preview of the exhibition and listen to the introduction by Marc Payot (Partner and Vice President, Hauser & Wirth).

Rita Ackermann: Negative Muscle, Hauser & Wirth, New York. Press preview, March 5, 2013.

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Excerpt from the press release:

In Rita Ackermann’s art, the systematic and the accidental are kept in a state of constant dialogue and debate. Balance and the effort to achieve it have become the main focus of her process, and a kind of magical flux has become both the subject and condition of her art. Nowhere is the alchemy of Ackermann’s work more vivid than in the group of seventeen paintings made between the years of 2010 and 2013 and presented in ‘Negative Muscle’, the artist’s first exhibition with Hauser & Wirth in New York, opening 5 March 2013.

‘Negative Muscle’ will remain on view at the gallery through 20 April 2013.

The exhibition takes its title from the very first painting Ackermann made following an intensive collaboration with filmmaker Harmony Korine on ‘Shadow Fux’, their 2010 exhibition of jointly-made collages at the Swiss Institute of Contemporary Art, New York NY. After ‘Shadow Fux’, Ackermann has said, ‘I felt a new kind of restless optimism about returning to my own artistic problems. I wanted to explore all the experience I collected while giving up an individual perspective. When I made ‘Negative Muscle’, I painted it freely without the confines of using photo elements or anything given to me to work with. It is a touchstone. I always think of it’.

Unfolding from ‘Negative Muscle’, the exhibition at Hauser & Wirth reveals Ackermann’s evolution over the past three years. Works on view include such 2010 paintings as ‘Without a Body’ and ‘Electro-Chemical Impulse’, achieved with the help of media ranging from oil paint and charcoal to rabbit skin glue, and a group of paintings on paper made in 2012.

The centrepiece of ‘Negative Muscle’ is a group of six new paintings from ‘Fire by Days’, a major ongoing series Ackermann initiated in late 2010. Heralding a merger of the non-representational and the figurative in her art, the ‘Fire by Days Blues’ canvases map Ackermann’s progression towards a highly personal and poetic form of abstraction.

Emphasizing the color blue in clouds and marks reminiscent of her ballpoint pen drawings, the ‘Fire by Days Blues’ paintings expand and intensify Ackermann’s longstanding motifs: As always, the artist creates compositional whirlpools, but the figurative quality of her earlier works has been liberated here by an unmistakable velocity. In the words of critic József Meyli, ‘Bodies move in and out of
the picture plane, constantly morphing, disintegrating and achieving an almost magical duality of weightless grace and monstrous heaviness’.

Once explicit in her art, the human form plays an erotic hide-and-seek in the new paintings by emerging from and disappearing into the picture. Lines of spray paint and patches of color on the surface challenge depth of space and crack open the underlying systems Ackermann has created within each painting. The effect suggests that Ackermann’s figures are born from deep within the complex internal order of her paintings and, in the words of József Meyli, ‘creasing her canvases and piercing the psychological plane like geological extrusions’. At the same time, the artist points to a parallel dimension beyond what we can see: by intertwining abstraction and representation, bringing bodies and gestures to the forefront and then obscuring them, Ackermann hints at rooms beyond those of the gallery where space, objects and ideas are absorbed into a realm of her own design.

Taking its title from French poet Roger Gilbert- Lecomte’s ‘Vacancy in Glass’, Ackermann’s ‘Fire by Days’ series began as an accidental spill of paint on her studio floor. Ackermann mopped up the spill with a Hungarian fire safety poster. ‘I wanted to then duplicate the pure power of the accident through this image,’ she has said. ‘I wanted to multiply its freedom. By repeating the elements of the raw creation of a ‘disaster’ and failing to keep it from unintentional learned gestures, I arrived at something that violently pushed itself between figuration and abstraction, pushing through to make itself completely free. This type of freedom in painting only arrives for mere seconds, or rather for an immeasurable amount of time, but it reveals infinite perspective’.

About the Artist
Rita Ackermann was born in 1968 in Budapest, Hungary. She currently lives and works in New York NY. Ackermann’s recent exhibitions include a solo show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami FL (2012); ‘Bakos’, Ludwig Museum, Budapest, Hungary (2011); and ‘Rita Ackermann and Harmony Korine: Shadow Fux’, Swiss Institute, New York NY (2010). Her work has also featured in numerous group presentations including ‘Looking at Music: 3.0′, Museum of Modern Art, New York NY (2011); ‘Inaugural Exhibition’, New Jersey Museum of Contemporary Art, New York NY (2010); ‘Street and Studio’, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria (2010); ‘Whitney Biennial’, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York NY (2008) and ‘Between Two Deaths’, Zentrum fur Kunst und Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe, Germany (2007).

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March 12 2013

Jon Kessler: The Web / Swiss Institute Contemporary Art New York

In this video, we attend the opening of mixed-media artist Jon Kessler’s current solo exhibition at the Swiss Institute Contemporary Art in New York. Titled The Web, the show is a large-scale immersive and interactive installation the visitor can participate in by downloading a special iPhone app (Jon Kessler’s The Web). The video provides you with a walk through the exhibition on the opening night and statements by Siebe Tettero (Director, Métamatic Research Initiative Amsterdam) and Gianni Jetzer (Director, Swiss Institute Contemporary Art New York) who talk about the concept of the exhibition. The show runs until April 28, 2013.

Jon Kessler’s The Web is a commission by the Metamatic Research Initative. The installation will travel to Museum Tinguely where it will be part of the exhibition Metamatic Reloaded. New art projects in dialogue with Tinguely’s drawing machines that runs from October 2013 to January 2014. The show will also feature works by Marina Abramovic and Thomas Hirschhorn.

Jon Kessler: The Web. Opening reception and interview with Siebe Tettero (Director, Métamatic Research Institute Amsterdam) and Gianni Jetzer (Director, Swiss Institute Contemporary Art New York), March 4, 2013.

For more videos on Jon Kessler’s work, click here!

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Press Release:

The Web is an immersive installation that addresses the significance of the Internet and mobile devices in our lives while simultaneously examining the role of the viewer. The idea for the piece came to Jon Kessler on a New York subway ride when he realized that at least half of the riders were speaking on their cell phones, sending text messages, playing video games, or otherwise immersing themselves in their networked mobile devices.

The Web offers both an accessible and impermeable user experience, the title referencing a closed-circuit network accessed by viewers. Upon entering the exhibition, visitors are invited to download an iPhone app that feeds their images in real time onto surrounding monitors. Simultaneously pictured and reframed in Kessler’s sculpture Infinite Regress, spectators render themselves as nodes within a feedback network, the space a physical support for their virtual daydreams. Kessler’s creation broadcasts collected data, targeting viewers with images of themselves, their experience, and ultimately enticing input and generating output.

Much like the Internet itself, The Web acts as both a sentient organism and an environmental space: it facilitates the internal circuit between viewer, camera, and monitor, while simultaneously doubling as a sprawling architectural structure. While The Web conceptually foregrounds the role of networked technologies and our dependence on them, it is in many ways a tribute to direct experience. The viewer of The Web is repositioned among fellow viewers, with the feeling of sensory dislocation condensed into one geographic location—the exhibition space—and recast as a form of shared collective immersion.

Jon Kessler’s work explores the connection between bodily movement and technical apparatus, often deploying mechanisms and video to facilitate this relationship. He has had solo exhibitions at MoMA PS1, New York; the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; the Phoenix Kulturstiftung; Sammlung Falckenberg, Hamburg, Germany; the Louisiana Museum of Moderne Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark; and most recently, the Fisher Landau Center for Art, New York. Kessler has been awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship as well as honors from the Foundation of the Performing Arts; he is a professor at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, Division of Visual Arts.

The Métamatic Research Initiative (MRI) stems from the fascination of art collectors Allard and Natascha Jakobs with the work of Jean Tinguely, and a more general interest in questions about the authorship of worksofart.

MRIstrivestodealwithissuesthatarisefromtheworkofJeanTinguely,inparticularhis Métamatic works. By initiating a variety of assignments for artists they instigate a process of artistic research resulting in contemporary works addressing these issues.

The exhibition will travel to Museum Tinguely, Basel, in October 2013.

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Sverre Bjertnes at White Columns, New York

White Columns in New York just opened the first solo exhibition in the United States by the New York-based Norwegian artist Sverre Bjertnes. The show is titled If you really loved me you would be able to admit that you’re ashamed of me, and has been developed by Sverre Bjertnes in collaboration with the artist Bjarne Melgaard. The exhibition presents new paintings and works on paper by Bjertnes, as well as earlier works. Furthermore, the show includes collaborative works made with both Melgaard and the artist’s mother Randi Koren Bjertnes, as well as a group of painted furniture works by the maverick furniture dealer and artist Robert Loughlin (1949-2011.) Bjertnes and Melgaard have worked together earlier: 2012 at Oslo’s Rod Bianco Gallery and Galleri K, and at New York’s Maccarone Gallery in 2011 – as a part of the widely celebrated exhibition After Shelley Duvall ’72 curated by Melgaard. Rod Bianco Gallery also showed a site-specific installation of the two artists at the Armory Show 2013.

Sverre Bjertnes at White Columns, New York. Opening reception, March 9, 2013.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Photo set:

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March 08 2013

Aaron Curry at Michael Werner Gallery at ADAA Art Show 2013, New York

At The Art Show 2013 in New York, the art fair organized by the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA), Michael Werner Gallery presents a solo exhibition with new work by the artist Aaron Curry. In this video, Birte Kleemann (Director, Michael Werner Gallery, New York), provides us with a short introduction to the works on display.

The Art Show features curated solo, two-person, and thematic exhibitions by 72 art dealers and galleries. The fair is now in its 25th year.

Aaron Curry was born in 1972 in San Antonio, Texas. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California. He studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2000-2002) and at the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena (2003-2005).

See also: Aaron Curry: mmnktlplkt / Michael Werner Gallery at 20 Hoxton Square, London (2010).

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

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March 07 2013

The Armory Show 2013

This year, The Armory Show in New York celebrates its ‘Centennial’ edition with over 200 galleries that present modern and contemporary art. Many galleries honor the legacy of the original Armory show of 1913 with their exhibits and stand concept. This video provides you with a walkthrough of the fair on the preview day.

The Armory Show 2013, New York / USA. Preview, March 6, 2013.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

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February 23 2013

February 08 2013

Outsider Art Fair 2013

This video provides you with a walkthrough of Outsider Art Fair 2013 in New York on the occasion of the opening reception of the fair. Outsider Art Fair was founded by Sanford Smith in 1993 and features Outsider, Self-Taught and Folk Art. The first 15 years, the fair was held at New York’s Puck Building. Wide Open Arts, a company formed by art dealer Andrew Edlin relocated the Outsider Art Fair to Chelsea at the site of the former Dia Foundation. Among the participants are mainly galleries from the US, but there are also galleries from Brussels, Tokyo, Lausanne, and London. The 2013 edition ran from January 31 to February 3, 2013 at Center 548 in New York.

Outsider Art Fair 2013, New York City. Opening reception, January 31, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

PS: For reviews of the fair, click here!

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> On YouTube:

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February 01 2013

Dieter Roth. Björn Roth. Hauser & Wirth New York

On 23 January 2013 Hauser & Wirth opened its new downtown gallery space in New York with the exhibition Dieter Roth. Björn Roth. The show presents more than 100 objects created by the German-born Swiss artist Dieter Roth (1930 – 1998) and his son Björn Roth, including works never before shown in the United States. Dieter Roth is known for his interdisciplinary oeuvre and his vision of art and life being indivisible. He was sculptor, painter, printmaker, collagist, poet, diarist, graphic designer, publisher, filmmaker, and musician. He used mediums such as fruit and chocolate, and collaborated intensively with other artists such as Richard Hamilton and Hermann Nitsch. Dieter Roth. Björn Roth inaugurates Hauser & Wirth’s second exhibition space in New York City, at 511 West 18th Street. The space features a fully functioning, site-specific liquor and coffee bar that Björn and Oddur Roth created for the exhibition. The bar will remain permanently at the new Hauser & Wirth space. In this video, we have a look at the new space and the exhibition on the occasion of the opening night. More info and press release are available after the break.

Dieter Roth. Björn Roth. Hauser & Wirth New York, 18th Street. Opening reception, January 23, 2013. Video by Shimon Azulay.

PS: Watch also our 2011 coverage of the Dieter Roth retrospective exhibition at Aargauer Kunsthaus in Switzerland.

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> On YouTube:

Landmark exhibition inaugurates the gallery’s new downtown space

New York NY… Sculptor, painter, printmaker, collagist, poet, diarist, graphic designer, publisher, filmmaker and musician, German-born Swiss artist Dieter Roth (1930 – 1998) has been described as ‘a performance artist in all the mediums he touched’. Everything Roth made involved acting out a central concept of art and life as utterly indivisible – a single enterprise in which material stuff is subservient to the emotional and sensual experience for which it stands. Roth was not an artist who tolerated boundaries. In seeking to pulverize them, he elevated the processes by which things happen, embracing accidents, mutations, and accretions of detail over time; inviting nature to have its way with unstable mediums, including fruit, chocolate, and sugar; and perhaps most boldly, inviting the dilution of his own authorship through constant, intensive collaboration with other artists. Those partners included such significant figures as Richard Hamilton, Emmett Williams, Arnulf Rainer, and Hermann Nitsch. But it was Roth’s long and symbiotic collaboration with his own son, artist Björn Roth, that stands as testament to the enormous and enduring potency of his restless, relentless process.

On 23 January 2013, Hauser & Wirth New York will open ‘Dieter Roth. Björn Roth’, a landmark exhibition of masterworks that highlights this remarkable twenty-year collaboration and, through it, the diversity of the practice that has established Dieter Roth as one of the most inventive and influential artists of the second half of the 20th century. ‘Dieter Roth. Björn Roth’ culminates Hauser & Wirth’s 20th anniversary and inaugurates the opening of the gallery’s new, second exhibition space in New York City, at 511 West 18th Street, between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues. Moreover, the exhibition sets the stage for major exhibitions to be presented at 18th Street in 2013 by three artists – Paul McCarthy, Roni Horn and Matthew Day Jackson – who claim Roth as their touchstone.

Organized with the cooperation of the Dieter Roth Foundation, Hamburg, Germany, ‘Dieter Roth. Björn Roth’ presents more than 100 objects created since the 1970s, including numerous works never before exhibited in the United States. Among these will be ‘The Floor I (Studio-floor from Mosfellsbaer, Iceland)’ from 1973 to 1992; a series of wall-mounted works form the 1980s comprised of such at-hand materials as toys, sweets, tools, refuse, and dead insects in plastic tubes; and key works from the ‘Tischtücher’ series of paintings made in the late 1980s and early 1990s from used tablecloths. Key examples of Dieter Roth’s poignant ‘Kleiderbilder’ paintings, made from the artist’s own clothes, also will be on view, as will the installation ‘Grosse Tischruine (Large Table Ruin)’, created by Dieter and Björn Roth with Eggert Einarsson between 1978 and 1998.

The exhibition will also present three major series of prints that spotlight Dieter Roth’s stunning mastery over and subversion of the printmaking process, drawing in fugitive materials whose ongoing deterioration gorgeously alter the final work over time.

‘Dieter Roth. Björn Roth’ revisits a major project shown previously in New York in 2004 at P.S. 1: ‘Solo Szenen (Solo Scenes)’, created by Dieter Roth in his final year (1997 – 1998), is the artist’s attempt at illustrating life as the accumulation of vast quantities of fragments of data. For this work, which has been described as ‘a Rembrandt self-portrait re-imagined as a video diary’, the ailing Roth traced his own trajectory through days and places by setting up cameras in his studios in Germany, Switzerland and Iceland, and filming himself going about daily activities that ranged from sketching and filing, to watering plants, slumbering, and reading on the toilet. While the resulting 128 videotapes of ‘Solo Scenes’ comprise a powerful elegiac finale to Dieter Roth’s mortal run, the humility and simplicity of their content imbues the total work with a sense of time suspended.

Perhaps most significantly, ‘Dieter Roth. Björn Roth’ extends the performative impulse at the heart of the Roth oeuvre into the present moment, illustrating Dieter Roth’s fundamental principle that art both defines and lies beyond the limits of time: Working on site for a month before and through the opening of the exhibition, Björn Roth, assisted by his sons Oddur and Einar, will construct the latest iterations of several pivotal installations originally conceived by Roth père as never-ending projects – masterpieces ceaselessly in the making. For ‘Shokoladeturm (Chocolate Tower)’ and ‘Zuckerturm (Sugar Tower)’, the Roths will build at Hauser & Wirth their own version of the original Dieter Roth sugar kitchen, that resides at the Dieter Roth Foundation’s Schimmelmuseum in Germany. With their new kitchen, the trio will cast chocolate and sugar elements – the four basic mold forms are the ‘Selbstportrait (Self-portait)’, the ‘Löwenselbst (Lion-self)’, the ‘Sphinx’, and the ‘Portraitbüste mit Löwenkopf (Self-portrait with lion head)’ – and stack them into evolving structures. The Roths’ first Sugar Tower collapsed in 1994; in the year preceding his death, Dieter Roth advised Björn to rebuild it in the future using the broken busts of the old tower.

Continuing another longstanding and on-going project of the Roths’ cross-generational practice, Björn and Oddur Roth will also create ‘Roth New York Bar’, a fully functioning, site-specific liquor and coffee bar for the exhibition. This bar will remain permanently at the new Hauser & Wirth space at 18th Street.

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