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December 06 2012

Four short links: 6 December 2012

  1. You’re Saving Time — can you explain what you do, as well as this? Love the clarity of thought, as well as elegance of expression.
  2. Related Content, by Wordnik — branching out by offering a widget for websites which recommends other content on your site which is related to the current page. I’ve been keen to see what Wordnik do with their text knowledge.
  3. How to Run a 5 Whys with Humans, Not Robots (Slideshare) — gold Gold GOLD! (via Hacker News)
  4. Open Computer Project Hackathon — have never heard of a hardware hackathon before, keen to see how it works out. (via Jim Stogdill)

October 19 2012

Four short links: 19 October 2012

  1. Home-made 3D-Printed Drones — if only they used computer-vision to sequence DNA, they’d be the perfect storm of O’Reilly memes :-)
  2. Hacking Pacemakers For DeathIOActive researcher Barnaby Jack has reverse-engineered a pacemaker transmitter to make it possible to deliver deadly electric shocks to pacemakers within 30 feet and rewrite their firmware.
  3. Google N-Gram Viewer Updated — now with more books, better OCR, parts of speech, and complex queries. e.g., the declining ratio of sex to drugs. Awesome work by Friend of O’Reilly, Jon Orwant.
  4. Deanonymizing Mobility Traces: Using Social Networks as a Side-Channela set of location traces can be deanonymized given an easily obtained social network graph. [...] Our experiments [on standard datasets] show that 80% of users are identified precisely, while only 8% are identified incorrectly, with the remainder mapped to a small set of users. (via Network World)

August 14 2012

August 13 2012

March 23 2012

September 06 2011

Four short links: 6 September 2011

  1. The Secret Life of Javascript Primitives -- good writing and clever headlines can make even the dullest topic seem interesting. This is interesting, I hasten to add.
  2. Backup Bouncer -- software to test how effective your backup tools are: you copy files to a test area by whatever means you like, then run this tool to see whether permissions, flags, owners, contents, timestamps, etc. are preserved. (via Joshua Schachter)
  3. reVerb -- open source (GPLv3) toolkit for learning triples from text. See the paper for more details.
  4. Patterns for Large-Scale Javascript Architecture -- enterprise (aka "scalable") architectures for Javascript apps.

March 21 2011

Four short links: 21 March 2011

  1. Javascript Trie Performance Analysis (John Resig) -- if you program in Javascript and you're not up to John's skill level (*cough*) then you should read this and follow along. It's a ride-along in the brain of a master.
  2. Think Stats -- an introduction to statistics for Python programmers. (via Edd Dumbill)
  3. Bolefloor -- they build curvy wooden floors. Instead of straightening naturally curvy wood (which is wasteful), they use CV and CAD/CAM to figure the smallest cuts to slot strips of wood together. It's gorgeous, green, and geeky. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Extracting Article Text from HTML Documents -- everyone's doing it, now you know how. It's the theory behind the lovingly hand-crafted magic of readability. (via Hacker News)

January 04 2011

August 17 2010

Four short links: 17 August 2010

  1. Demo of Stemming Algorithms -- type in text and see what it looks like when stemmed with different algorithms provided by NLTK. (via zelandiya on Twitter)
  2. Crowdmap -- hosted Ushahidi. (via dvansickle on Twitter)
  3. Opinions vs Data -- talks about the usability of a new gmail UI element, but notable for this quote from Jakob Nielsen: In my two examples, the probability of making the right design decision was vastly improved when given the tiniest amount of empirical data. (via mcannonbrookes on Twitter)
  4. The Next Silicon Valley -- long and detailed list of the many forces contributing to Silicon Valley's success as tech hub, arguing that the valley's position is path-dependent and can simply be grown ab initio in some aspiring nation's co-prosperity zone of policy whim. (via imran and timoreilly on Twitter)

August 10 2010

Four short links: 10 August 2010

  1. Smoking and Ill Health: Does Lay Epidemiology Explain the Failure of Smoking Cessation Programs Among Deprived Populations? -- Here we pose the question of whether the poorer life chances of those who continue to smoke in effect constitute a rational disincentive to their avoidance or cessation of smoking. (via bengoldacre on Twitter)
  2. Scaling the New Bar for Latency in Financial Networks -- Since the first trade to the market gets the best price, the delivery of a buy or sell order must be as fast as possible. Just a little more than a year ago, firms were concentrating on removing milliseconds from their network; today, a mere 250 nanoseconds make a difference. (via economicsnz on Twitter)
  3. Cataloging Bibliographic Data with Natural Language and RDF (OKFN) -- In the grand tradition of W3C IRC bots, I’ve started some speculative work on a robot that tries to understand natural language descriptions of works and their authors and generates RDF. It is written in Python and uses ORDF, the NLTK and FuXi.
  4. Eurotrash Security -- European infosec podcast. Latest episode features Ivan Ristic on SSL. (via ivanristic on Twitter)

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