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May 29 2013

Gabriel Orozco at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City

For his current exhibition at Kurimanzutto Gallery in Mexico City, artist Gabriel Orozco decided to work with river stones. Orozco is a passionate collector of things. This time he decided to collect something that nature prepared over many, many years and re-use it and give it a new meaning. The exhibition runs until June 15, 2013.

Upcoming solo exhibition of Gabriel Orozco include Kunsthaus Bregenz (July 7 – October 6, 2013) and Edinburgh Art Festival Exhibition, Fruit Market Gallery (August 1 – October 20, 2013).

Gabriel Orozco at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City. Opening, April 13, 2013. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

For more videos on Gabriel Orozco, such as Gabriel Orozco’s Retrospective at Kunstmuseum Basel, visit our archive.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Excerpt from the press release:

The artist—always watchful—comes across the stones. Ordinary river stones; but, it should be noted, of an inter- esting size: not your typical pebble that fits in the palm of your hand, but stones similar in size—also because of their oval form—to a football.
It is highly unlikely that the idea of how they would be later intervene emerged clearly in that first moment, but there is something in the objects (their colours, their drawings, their size) that replenishes the creative impulse; that is to say, that places the artist one more time at the beginning of something. For Orozco, this is how the process starts: based on a hypothesis that defines a provisional working course. That is why the work is always the how it could be, not the how it should be.
The stone, in any case, is a variation of a theme to which this artist constantly comes back to in his work: the circle—and all its derivatives: the sphere, the balloon, the ball, the disc, the wheel, the planet, the orbit. It is there, at the centre of the circle, where Orozco likes to pinpoint the beginning of things; a beginning that aims in all direc- tions—unlike the immovable unidirectionality of the straight line. And that is why in his work we find oranges, tires, soccer balls, billiard balls, sand balls, melons and all kinds of objects close to the sphere: potatoes, watermelons, mixiotes1, seeds, hands that are the heart. Because they are bodies that speak of what the circle speaks: of mobil- ity, of cycles, of game, of fullness, of rotation, etc.
This stones are made to be touched: that is why the drawings are not superimposed, they penetrate the stone. Although, well-regarded, a cleft is actually nothing but a space that occupies a place in matter. But occupies it conversely to graphite: here the void is not the organic form that is left free from drawing, it is the gap itself that produces the drawing. So, it is not about just a void, but a void where there used to be something: more stone. But that which diminishes the original materiality is precisely that which increases the sense of the work (it stops being a stone to become a sculpture). You might say, an exchange of substances. The less stone the more sculp- ture, the stone collaborates here becoming a drawing itself.
Nevertheless, the dialog between two sculpting forms stays intact: that of nature, which makes the stone go from a rough and jagged rock to a polished cobblestone; and that of the artist, who, as we have already stated, is the one that cuts (literally, with a sharp diamond tip).

gabriel-orozco-041313

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May 06 2013

The Hunter and the Factory at Fundación / Colección Jumex, Mexico City

The Hunter and the Factory at Fundación / Colección Jumex in Mexico City that brings together works by Doug Aitken, Miguel Calderón, Maurizio Cattelan, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Sam Durant, Olafur Eliasson, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Rodney Graham, Jonathan Hernández & Alberto Baraya, Roman Ondák, Damián Ortega, Fernando Ortega, Ugo Rondinone, Anri Sala, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, among others. The Hunter and the Factory, curated by Magalí Arriola and Juan Gaitán, “is an exhibition comprising a selection of artworks from La Colección Jumex that combined with other artistic proposals generates an allegorical environment pertaining to the relations that arise between urban spaces and nature, as well as the problems that these generate. In addition to broadly engaging with subjects such as the dystopian character of the contemporary city, the consequences of industrialization, or the lack of cultural and public spaces, this group of artworks also leads us to explore and question the role that an institution, such as Fundación/Colección Jumex, can potentially play in its immediate surrounding, in this case, Ecatepec.”

The Hunter and the Factory at Fundación / Colección Jumex in Mexico City, April 11, 2013. Video by Diago García Sotomoro.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

hunter-factory-041113

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April 25 2013

Etienne Chambaud: The Naked Parrot / Galería Labor, Mexico City

The Naked Parrot is the title of the current solo exhibition of French artist Etienne Chambaud at Galería Labor in Mexico City. The exhibition features photographs of a parrot and an installation composed of bronze human heads that are penetrated and connected by tubes.

Etienne Chambaud was born in Mulhouse, France, in 1980. He lives and works in Paris, France. His education and residencies include: ECAL (Lausanne, Switzerland), ENBA (Lyon, France), Villa Arson (Nice, France), and International Studio & Curatorial Program ISCP (Brooklyn, USA). Solo exhibitions or duo shows include: When Attitudes Became Form Became Attitudes, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (San Francisco, USA), O-RA-LI-TÉ, Bugada & Cargnel (Paris, France), and Le Musée Décapité, Sies + Höke (Düsseldorf, Germany).

Etienne Chambaud: The Naked Parrot / Galería Labor, Mexico City. April 8, 2013. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

etienne-chambaud-040813

From the press release:

The Naked Parrot, the first addressee of the eponymous exhibition at Labor, is a modern chimera, a being fully constructed from the outside. Here this construction is not based on mythological grounds or scales, but on the very process of creation of figures that we inherited from modern machines such as the zoo and the museum. Domestication and conservation are indeed stitching techniques that endlessly attempt to heal the wound of the cuts their very existences are based on. The Naked Parrot is thus an assemblage of exogenous intentions collapsing on their sutured understandings and misunderstandings: the idea of a human talking animal in a falling pigeonhole.

To be naked, to lay bare, the parrot had to be dressed up by this theater of the outside. What is laying bare if not precisely this deluded work: the private seriousness within the beaming positivity of deceit? — The only way to fabricate truth out of error.

In the exhibition space, a self-supporting structure with no fixed shape has emerged: the Fractal Zoo. It is composed of abandoned and forgotten bronze human figures crossed over by industrial beams. On this fragile yet massive structure built as an arrested fall, between the plinth and the cage, the farm and the theater stage, birds have lived, yet are gone. What remains of them in the show are sketches of their feathers unaddressed expressions and traces of their induced colored feces.

The Fractal Zoo lays empty — vacant habitat of the Naked Parrot — crossed only by human presence.

The time of the exhibition is not the time of the Naked Parrot.

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March 10 2013

The Architectural Ellipsis / Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco, Mexico City

The Architectural Ellipsis at Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco in Mexico City is a project by Ruth Estévez and Javier Toscano. It “explores the possibility of thinking through the consequences of an architectural reason that wants to go beyond both the ordering subjectivity of its creators, producers and critics, and the entire sphere of discourse that constitutes it.“ (excerpt from the exhibition text). The artists participating are Esteban Azuela, Tania Candiani, Jordi Colomer, Democracia, Jimmie Durham, Larissa Fassler, Luca Frei, León Ferrari, Enrique Ježik, José Jiménez Ortiz, Mark Manders, Matt Mullican, Erik Olofsen, Clarisa Tossin and Anri Sala. The exhibition runs until June 16, 2013.

The Architectural Ellipsis / Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco, Mexico City. June 27, 2013. Video by Jacinto Astiazarán.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Press release:

The constitution of the disciplines of knowledge and of action has grown up around the precise delimitation of their analytical categories, the identification of the problems they address, the determination of their goals and the concrete means of achieving these. In this regard, architecture does not escape any of the usual rules of discursive construction. Nevertheless, the real world is not parcelled up into ordered disciplines to the same degree as the epistemological imagination would have us believe.

This project explores the possibility of thinking through the consequences of an architectural reason that wants to go beyond both the ordering subjectivity of its creators, producers and critics, and the entire sphere of discourse that constitutes it. It is evident that this territory has no official existence, nor is it generated merely on the basis of negating the order architecture entails. A cue: given that we are not working in the field of a particular discipline, and not subject to the same logic, it may be evoked through the use of ellipses, analogies and chiasms, references and partial allusions that form an inter-disciplinary field in which other kinds of operations of analysis and experimentation are possible.

Following this idea, it may be thought that an ellipsis of this architectural logic might make visible phenomena from other perspectives that are blind spots for architecture itself. Certain forms of art—performance, conceptual and post-conceptual practices, archive interventions—may constitute creative forms of understanding this meta-architectural order, in order to explore architecture beyond function, beyond the generation of spaces, beyond the functions of the field. From this moment on, it is possible to rethink any construction as a symbol and model of organization, its territorial demands as political demands, and its understanding of notions of citizenship and the (dis)ordered activities of individuals.

At the same time, the exploration of the alternate, ex-centric use of architectural tools engaged in by these artistic practices may provide a platform to investigate other facets of what may broadly be called the foundation of experience—in this case through denatured forms of representation—of what sometimes comes to make up a major part of our everyday urban practice. Thus, the détournement of the arsenal of architectural tools serves at the same time to reveal aspects of an architectural knowledge that are not necessarily evident to the practice itself, as well as to examine, from the perspective of other cognitive tools, the possibilities for meaning and impact of a habitability that can only be grasped on a multiplicity of levels.

Participating artists: Esteban Azuela, Tania Candiani, Jordi Colomer, Democracia, Jimmie Durham, Larissa Fassler, Luca Frei, León Ferrari, Enrique Ježik, José Jiménez Ortiz, Mark Manders, Matt Mullican, Erik Olofsen, Clarisa Tossin and Anri Sala.

A book accompanies the exhibition. It presents a group of theoretical texts and other experimental pieces which, stemming from different disciplines—anthropology, geography, urbanism or architecture itself—and from international case studies, provide different cognitive approaches and perspectives. It includes original artistic pieces and research by Santiago Borja, Decolonizing Architecture (Alessandro Petti, Sandi Hilal & Eyal Weizman), Sarah Demeuse, Ruth Estévez, Chloé Fricout & Javier Toscano and James Zomighani.

During the exhibition, the uiui (unit for intensive urban imagination) will produce, in collaboration with the Laboratorio para la Ciudad, a series of tours around Mexico City, guided by Cecilia Barraza (art historian) & Luisa Cortés (cultural promoter), María José Freytes & Ana Nava (artists), Luisa Lacorte (social scientist), Pablo Landa (anthropologist) and Gustavo Lipkau (architect). After every tour, the guides will give public talks at the Centro Cultural España. For the complete program please visit www.uiui-urbanunit.net or www.ccemx.org.

tlatelolco-022713

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February 27 2013

Laura Lima. For the Love of Dissent / MUAC, Mexico City

In this video we have a look at Brazilian artist Laura Lima’s work for the new curatorial program Sexta Sur of Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC). For the love of dissent is the title of the first series of exhibitions held as part of the Sexta Sur project. The artwork of Laura Lima takes the body as starting point and sets it in relation to the exhibition building and the landscape around the museum.

Laura Lima. For the Love of Dissent / MUAC, Mexico City. Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City. February 9, 2013. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

From the exhibition webpage:

For the love of dissent is the title of the first series of exhibitions held as part of the Sexta Sur project, comprising Edgardo Aragón (Mexico), Laura Lima (Brazil), Carlos Bunga (Portugal) and Marcela Armas (Mexico). Fundamental to the curators’ intention is for each of the proposals to take anti-gravity as a key vector, addressing the notion by way of a dissident reaction. Although the projects are presented separately, the intervention of each of these artists in the space generates an out-of-synch conversation between their practices on the basis of the idea of the local, global, historical, technological and performative, beginning with the shared horizon of dissidence.

2/4
Laura Lima
For the love of dissent

The artwork of Laura Lima takes the body as its starting point, and integrates it as a material potential and as an object of knowledge and sensibility, as just another element in the configuration of the work in space. She produces living works in which the gesture takes on scale within the context of the installation. Rather than fitting pre-established categories such as the performance or the happening, Lima is interested in the “carnality” not only of living beings, but of things and the world. This is the basis of her glossaries such as her formula H=c–M=c [Man=flesh/woman=flesh] which since 1995 has generated a series of paradoxical works that reflect on the forms and meaning of the body in contemporary life.

Part of the same series, the work HcMc–Puxador [HcMc–Handle] joins For the love of dissent with the aim of challenging the meaning of the room as limitation and condition of the exhibition space. As such, the body does not follow a narrative, but rather activates the work to generate a displacement towards the exterior, revealing the height, distance and tension between the human scale and the dimensions of the building, while directing our attention to the landscape around the museum.

Sexta Sur

Sexta Sur is a new curatorial program that brings together four solo exhibitions each year by emerging artists from both Mexico and abroad, with the aim of creating a platform for alternatives and experimentation that enables a flow of divergent and spontaneous interventions that form an authentic dialogue. The sum of each artist’s occupation of the space at different times will combine such that each project may be considered a fraction of a whole: 1/4, 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4.

Information in Spanish:

Por amor a la disidencia es el título de la primera serie de exposiciones del proyecto Sexta Sur* integrada por Edgardo Aragón (México), Laura Lima (Brasil), Carlos Bunga (Portugal) y Marcela Armas (México). Parte fundamental del planteamiento curatorial es que cada una de las propuestas integre la antigravedad como vector fundamental, al tiempo de reflexionarla como una reacción disidente. Aunque los proyectos se presenten de manera individual, la intervención de cada uno de estos artistas en el espacio genera una conversación a des-tiempo entre sus prácticas, desde lo local, lo global, lo histórico, lo tecnológico y lo performático, partiendo del horizonte compartido de la disidencia.

2/4
Laura Lima
Por amor a la disidencia

El trabajo de Laura Lima parte del cuerpo como principio de su investigación, lo integra en su propuesta como una potencia material, como un objeto de conocimiento y sensibilidad, un elemento más de la configuración de la obra en el espacio. Se trata de piezas vivas donde el gesto adquiere una dimensión en el conjunto de la instalación. Más que insertarse en categorías específicas como el performance o el happening, Lima se interesa por la “carnalidad” no sólo de los seres vivos, sino de las cosas y del mundo; de ahí que genere glosarios propios como su fórmula H=c–M=c [Hombre=carne/Mujer=carne] con la que desde 1995 viene configurando una serie de piezas paradójicas que reflexionan sobre las formas y el significado del cuerpo en la vida contemporánea.

Perteneciente a la misma serie, la obra HcMc–Puxador [HcMc–Jalador] se integra a Por amor a la disidencia con el fin de generar un desbordamiento de lo que implica la sala como límite y condicionante del espacio de exhibición. En este sentido, el cuerpo no sigue una narrativa, tan sólo activa la pieza para generar un desplazamiento hacia el exterior, haciendo visible la altura, la distancia y la tensión entre la escala humana y las dimensiones del edificio, al mismo tiempo nos dirige hacia el paisaje que rodea al museo.

*Sexta Sur
Sexta Sur es un nuevo programa curatorial que integra cuatro exposiciones individuales al año de artistas emergentes, nacionales y extranjeros, con el fin de generar un espacio de alternancia y experimentación que permita el flujo de intervenciones divergentes y espontáneas que se integren a un verdadero diálogo. En este sentido y jugando con la idea de un cuarto como “espacio propio” la ocupación de cada uno de los artistas en distintos momentos se irá sumando con el fin de que cada uno de los proyectos sea concebido como la fracción de un todo: 1/4, 2/4, 3/4 y 4/4.

laura-lima-0213

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January 11 2013

Guy de Cointet: Tempo Rubato at Fundación / Colección Jumex

The exhibition Tempo Rubato at Fundación / Colección Jumex in Mexico City is dedicated to the French-born artist Guy de Cointet. Curated by Magalí Arriola, Guy de Cointet – Tempo Rubato features set design, performance art, prints and drawings, as well as documents relating to the artist’s life and work. Guy de Cointet was born in Paris in 1934. He moved to New York in 1965, and then to Los Angeles in 1968. He lived in Los Angeles from 1968 until his death in 1983. His work is said to have influenced that of Paul McCarthy, Mike Kelley, and others. The exhibition Guy de Cointet – Tempo Rubato at Fundación / Colección Jumex in Mexico City runs until February 24, 2013.

Guy de Cointet: Tempo Rubato. Retrospective at Fundación / Colección Jumex in Mexico City. Opening reception, November 30, 2012.

PS: From January 16, LACE Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions will present the exhibition LA Existancial. The show is organized by curator Marie de Brugerolle and brings together international artists such as John Baldessari and Andrea Fraser to explore the legacy of Guy de Cointet.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

From the press release:

After discussing the Italians’ skill of performing with their hands while they’re talking as if improvising on a melody, Rosa and Butch—the main characters in Guy de Cointet and Robert Wilhite’s IGLU—converse about what they understand by tempo rubato. In their exchange, the musical term that refers to the expressive and rhythmic freedom of the performer who shapes music by introducing variations to the tempo of the original score, is now a matter of performative speech. This very sense of practiced spontaneity in the production of meaning is what gives substance to Guy de Cointet’s synesthetic practice, whose associations of shapes, words, and body language, manage to undermine the social values and cultural codes that administer our day-to-day lives.

The exhibition Guy de Cointet – Tempo Rubato features prints and drawings, performance art and set design, as well as various documents relating to the life and work of Guy de Cointet, a French artist born in 1934 who lived in Los Angeles from 1968 until his death in 1983. The show includes a wide range of works: from his first encrypted drawings and books, to his later monologues and theatrical productions inspired by the current events of his time, mass media, and popular culture. Growing up in a military family, de Cointet had a marked fascination for the encrypted languages used during World War II, and the everyday dynamics generated around them, that he further associated with the manipulative character of the media. After traveling to New York City where he frequented Andy Warhol’s Factory, he moved to Los Angeles where he worked as an assistant to sculptor Larry Bell. This was where de Cointet began to use the dialogue in Mexican radio soap operas, the world of fashion, and the communication codes that mediate people’s interactions, as some of the main sources for his work.

Finding inspiration in such diverse territories as domestic conversations, literary passages and pre-Columbian codices, de Cointet conceived, over the years, a series of situations in the form of graphics and performable texts that, like lost or misplaced moments, manage to escape the routine of daily life. In these situations, words generate images that become stories without a plot. These narratives-in-the-making are deployed in space as characters activate objects and as the identity of these objects shifts, making them acquire a life of their own that manages to unsettle and transcend the ordinary.

This exhibition, unprecedented in Mexico, represents not only an occasion for the work to travel to a territory that was familiar to the artist, but it provides viewers with the opportunity to delve into a seldom-explored terrain, one where painting, sculpture, storytelling and performance intermingle, and one that has acquired renewed relevance in the art making of recent years.

guy-de-cointet-113012

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December 24 2012

Jill Magid: Faust 24 at Galería Labor, Mexico City

The exhibition Faust 24 at Galería Labor is American artist Jill Magid’s first solo exhibition in Mexico. Faust 24 deals with the gun violence and public shootings in the US, specifically with the school shooting at the University of Texas in Austin in 2010, where a student, Colton Tooley, walked through the campus firing shots into the air and ground with an AK47 assault rifle, and finally committed suicide.

Jill Magid’s exhibition at Galería Labor presents Police footage of the event and related 911 calls. In addition, Magid wrote a dramatic text, based on her transcription of the material. This book, titled Tooley, A Tragedy, is shown alongside Goethe’s drama, Faust. Both texts are open to page 24, where suicide is either confirmed or imminent.

Jill Magid was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1973. She lives and works in New York. Magid received her Master of Science in Visual Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. The artist has exhibited in various institutions including Stedelijk, Amsterdam (2005), Gagosian Gallery, New York (2007), Tate Modern, London (2009), and Yvon Lambert, Paris (2012).

Jill Magid: Faust 24 at Galería Labor, Mexico City. November 17, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Press release (English):

Faust 24 evokes an atmosphere of a distressed search, delimited by the dash-cam surveillance recordings of five patrol cars that responded to an emergency call of a school shooter at the University of Texas in late 2010. The perpetrator, a math major named Colton Tooley, wearing a ski mask and armed with an AK47, walked through campus firing shots into the air and ground. Harming no one other than himself, Tooley, ended his route by taking his own life in the Comparative Literature and Poetry section of the Perry-Castañeda Library.

The motives behind the spectacle Tooley created and his suicide are unknown. The enigma opens up the intuitive possibilities of the dramatic text that Magid wrote, based directly on her transcriptions of the police footage and related 911 calls, which the artist obtained with an Open Records Request to the UT Police Department. The book, Tooley, A Tragedy, is shown alongside an abridged facsimile of Goethe’s drama, Faust. Both texts are open to page 24, the moment within each narrative where suicide is either confirmed or seemingly imminent. The monologue in which Faust, alone in his library, prepares to drink a phial of poison can be heard on the headphones hanging over the desk.

It is possible to look through the book Tooley, A Tragedy, as well as its Spanish translation, with the help of Labor’s staff.

Faust is one of the universal ciphers for doubt and death, a poetic work that Magid has adopted in recent projects as a way of gaining insight into recent public shootings in the US.

Jill Magid lives and works in New York. Her work “is incisive in its poetic questioning of the ethics of human behavior and the hidden political structures of society. Her intelligent conceptual strategies engage the viewer in an absorbing aesthetic and intellectual experience that turns conventional assumptions of power, secrecy, control and social space inside out.” (Chrissie Isles, 2010).

Among others, her recent exhibitions include The Status of the Shooter, Yvon Lambert, Paris 2012. Failed States, Arthouse, Austin TX, 2012. Closet Drama, Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley CA, 2011. A Reasonable Man in a Box, Whitney Museum, NY, 2010. Author- ity To Remove, Tate Modern, London 2009. With Full Consent, Gagosian Gallery, NY, 2007.

LABOR, Mexico City, 2012

Press release (Spanish):

Faust 24 sugiere una atmósfera de angustia, delimitada por las grabaciones de las video cámaras integradas a las cinco patrullas que atendían el llamado de amenaza de una masacre colectiva en la Universidad de Texas a finales del año 2010. El perpetrador, Colton Tooley, usando un pasamontañas y armado con una AK-47, caminó por el campus disparando hacia el aire y la tierra. Sin lastimar a nadie más que a sí mismo, Tooley terminó quitándose la vida en la sección de Literatura Comparada y Poesía de la biblioteca Perry-Castañeda.

Las razones detrás del espectáculo montado por Tooley y su posterior suicidio son inciertas. Este enigma abre las posibilidades intuitivas del libro escrito por Magid a partir de la transcripción de grabaciones de la policía y de las llamadas registradas en el 911. La información fue obtenida por la artista tras solicitar al Departamento de Policía de la Universidad de Texas que abriera sus registros. El libro, que lleva por título Tooley, A Tragedy, se muestra sobre un escritorio de madera, junto a un facsímil abreviado del Fausto de Goethe. Los dos libros están abiertos en la página 24, momento en el que el suicidio se presenta o es inminente en ambos textos. El monólogo en el que Fausto, a solas en su biblioteca, se prepara para beber una ampolla de veneno puede escucharse en los audífonos que cuelgan sobre el escritorio.

Tanto el libro Tooley, A Tragedy, como una traducción al Español de la narración que se escucha en los audífonos, pueden consultarse con el personal de LABOR.

Fausto, de Goethe, es uno de los códigos universales sobre la duda y la muerte, un eje poético que Magid ha retomado en sus proyectos más recientes para indagar en las razones detrás de los recientes tiroteos públicos en los Estados Unidos.

Jill Magid vive y trabaja en Nueva York. Su obra “es incisiva en su cuestionamiento poético de la ética del comportamiento humano y las clandestinas estructuras políticas de la sociedad. Sus astutas estrategias conceptuales involucran al espectador en una fascinante experiencia intelectual y estética que invierte las convenciones del poder, el ocultamiento, el control y el espacio social.” (Chrissie Isles, 2010).

Entre otras, su exhibiciones recientes incluyen The Status of the Shooter, Yvon Lambert, Paris 2012. Failed States, Arthouse, Austin TX, 2012. Closet Drama, Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley CA, 2011. A Reasonable Man in a Box, Whitney Museum, NY, 2010. Authority To Remove, Tate Modern, London 2009. With Full Consent, Gagosian Gallery, NY, 2007.

LABOR, Ciudad de México, 2012

jill-magid-111712

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Jill Magid: Faust 24 at Galería Labor, Mexico City

The exhibition Faust 24 at Galería Labor is American artist Jill Magid’s first solo exhibition in Mexico. Faust 24 deals with the gun violence and public shootings in the US, specifically with the school shooting at the University of Texas in Austin in 2010, where a student, Colton Tooley, walked through the campus firing shots into the air and ground with an AK47 assault rifle, and finally committed suicide.

Jill Magid’s exhibition at Galería Labor presents Police footage of the event and related 911 calls. In addition, Magid wrote a dramatic text, based on her transcription of the material. This book, titled Tooley, A Tragedy, is shown alongside Goethe’s drama, Faust. Both texts are open to page 24, where suicide is either confirmed or imminent.

Jill Magid was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1973. She lives and works in New York. Magid received her Master of Science in Visual Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. The artist has exhibited in various institutions including Stedelijk, Amsterdam (2005), Gagosian Gallery, New York (2007), Tate Modern, London (2009), and Yvon Lambert, Paris (2012).

Jill Magid: Faust 24 at Galería Labor, Mexico City. November 17, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

Press release (English):

Faust 24 evokes an atmosphere of a distressed search, delimited by the dash-cam surveillance recordings of five patrol cars that responded to an emergency call of a school shooter at the University of Texas in late 2010. The perpetrator, a math major named Colton Tooley, wearing a ski mask and armed with an AK47, walked through campus firing shots into the air and ground. Harming no one other than himself, Tooley, ended his route by taking his own life in the Comparative Literature and Poetry section of the Perry-Castañeda Library.

The motives behind the spectacle Tooley created and his suicide are unknown. The enigma opens up the intuitive possibilities of the dramatic text that Magid wrote, based directly on her transcriptions of the police footage and related 911 calls, which the artist obtained with an Open Records Request to the UT Police Department. The book, Tooley, A Tragedy, is shown alongside an abridged facsimile of Goethe’s drama, Faust. Both texts are open to page 24, the moment within each narrative where suicide is either confirmed or seemingly imminent. The monologue in which Faust, alone in his library, prepares to drink a phial of poison can be heard on the headphones hanging over the desk.

It is possible to look through the book Tooley, A Tragedy, as well as its Spanish translation, with the help of Labor’s staff.

Faust is one of the universal ciphers for doubt and death, a poetic work that Magid has adopted in recent projects as a way of gaining insight into recent public shootings in the US.

Jill Magid lives and works in New York. Her work “is incisive in its poetic questioning of the ethics of human behavior and the hidden political structures of society. Her intelligent conceptual strategies engage the viewer in an absorbing aesthetic and intellectual experience that turns conventional assumptions of power, secrecy, control and social space inside out.” (Chrissie Isles, 2010).

Among others, her recent exhibitions include The Status of the Shooter, Yvon Lambert, Paris 2012. Failed States, Arthouse, Austin TX, 2012. Closet Drama, Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley CA, 2011. A Reasonable Man in a Box, Whitney Museum, NY, 2010. Author- ity To Remove, Tate Modern, London 2009. With Full Consent, Gagosian Gallery, NY, 2007.

LABOR, Mexico City, 2012

Press release (Spanish):

Faust 24 sugiere una atmósfera de angustia, delimitada por las grabaciones de las video cámaras integradas a las cinco patrullas que atendían el llamado de amenaza de una masacre colectiva en la Universidad de Texas a finales del año 2010. El perpetrador, Colton Tooley, usando un pasamontañas y armado con una AK-47, caminó por el campus disparando hacia el aire y la tierra. Sin lastimar a nadie más que a sí mismo, Tooley terminó quitándose la vida en la sección de Literatura Comparada y Poesía de la biblioteca Perry-Castañeda.

Las razones detrás del espectáculo montado por Tooley y su posterior suicidio son inciertas. Este enigma abre las posibilidades intuitivas del libro escrito por Magid a partir de la transcripción de grabaciones de la policía y de las llamadas registradas en el 911. La información fue obtenida por la artista tras solicitar al Departamento de Policía de la Universidad de Texas que abriera sus registros. El libro, que lleva por título Tooley, A Tragedy, se muestra sobre un escritorio de madera, junto a un facsímil abreviado del Fausto de Goethe. Los dos libros están abiertos en la página 24, momento en el que el suicidio se presenta o es inminente en ambos textos. El monólogo en el que Fausto, a solas en su biblioteca, se prepara para beber una ampolla de veneno puede escucharse en los audífonos que cuelgan sobre el escritorio.

Tanto el libro Tooley, A Tragedy, como una traducción al Español de la narración que se escucha en los audífonos, pueden consultarse con el personal de LABOR.

Fausto, de Goethe, es uno de los códigos universales sobre la duda y la muerte, un eje poético que Magid ha retomado en sus proyectos más recientes para indagar en las razones detrás de los recientes tiroteos públicos en los Estados Unidos.

Jill Magid vive y trabaja en Nueva York. Su obra “es incisiva en su cuestionamiento poético de la ética del comportamiento humano y las clandestinas estructuras políticas de la sociedad. Sus astutas estrategias conceptuales involucran al espectador en una fascinante experiencia intelectual y estética que invierte las convenciones del poder, el ocultamiento, el control y el espacio social.” (Chrissie Isles, 2010).

Entre otras, su exhibiciones recientes incluyen The Status of the Shooter, Yvon Lambert, Paris 2012. Failed States, Arthouse, Austin TX, 2012. Closet Drama, Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley CA, 2011. A Reasonable Man in a Box, Whitney Museum, NY, 2010. Authority To Remove, Tate Modern, London 2009. With Full Consent, Gagosian Gallery, NY, 2007.

LABOR, Ciudad de México, 2012

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December 20 2012

Olinka and Aurora. Two New Exhibitions at Museo Tamayo, Mexico City

Two new exhibitions have recently opened at the expanded and renovated Museo Tamayo in Mexico City: Olinka or Where Movement is Created, and Aurora: A Project by Pia Rönicke. Olinka runs until April 15, 2013, Aurora is on display until February 19, 2013.

Olinka or Where Movement is Created is a group exhibition curated by the director of Kunsthalle Basel, Adam Szymzcyk. He was originally invited in 2010 to curate an exhibition at the Museo Tamayo. The show he came up with is based on a project called “Olinka”, an imaginary international city of culture conceived by the Mexican artist Dr. Atl (Gerardo Murillo 1875–1964).

The exhibition Aurora: A Project by Pia Rönicke is an elaboration and continuation of the artist’s former work Scanning Through Landscapes (2008-2010), which revolves around a small settlement in Los Angeles called Chávez Ravine.

Olinka and Aurora. Two New Exhibitions at Museo Tamayo, Mexico City. Opening, December 11, 2012. Video by Jacinto Astiazarán.

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Press release:

The recently expanded and renovated Museo Tamayo is pleased to announce two new projects opening as 2012 draws to a close: Olinka or Where Movement is Created, a group exhibition curated by Adam Szymzcyk, guest curator, and Aurora: A project by Pia Rönicke, curated by Magnolia de la Garza, Associate Curator at Museo Tamayo.

Szymczyk was originally invited in 2010 to curate an exhibition at the Museo Tamayo. Since then, he has become interested in the concept of Olinka, a project conceived by the Mexican artist Dr. Atl (Gerardo Murillo 1875–1964). “Olinka” is Dr. Atl’s name for his imaginary international city of culture, where artists, poets, philosophers and scientists would gather to plan human evolution. Olinka comes from the word Ollin, which is Nahuatl for movement, change and earthquake.

The imaginary conception of Olinka is transferred to the exhibition space seen as a place in movement. The curatorial discourse proposes a dialogue between contemporary artists and the works and documents of Dr. Atl and Nahui Ollin; two relevant characters in the artistic scene of Mexico during the 1940s. The exhibition features works by Nairy Baghramian, Ross Birrell and David Harding, Mariana Castillo Deball, Kate Davis, Thea Djordjadze, Susan Hiller, Paulina Olowska, Manuel Rodríguez Lozano, Vivian Suter, Tercerunquinto, Danh Vo and Elisabeth Wild.

In spite of the differences between the original contexts in which these works were made, every piece in this exhibition shares a peculiar relation with the past. Far from considering history as a collection of facts accumulated in memory, Olinka or Where Movement is Created perceives history as an unstable territory in constant movement, with the possibility of becoming materialized when being reinterpreted or evoked.

Aurora: A project by Pia Rönicke, is an elaboration and continuation of her former work Scanning Through Landscapes (2008–2010), a story that revolves around the site in Los Angeles called Elysian Park, a place hidden in the hills of the park that used to be the home of a small settlement called Chávez Ravine, which established there in the early 1900s.

Chávez Ravine was an urban settlement largely inhabited by descendants of Mexican immigrants. In 1949, the Los Angeles government negotiated the purchase of the houses from the owners, who were promised to receive a new home from the new public housing program said to be developed in that land. However, the plans were abandoned, leaving many of the members from this community homeless. In 1960 the area was used for the construction of the stadium for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Angels baseball teams. Nevertheless, the residents who remained in the neighborhood tried to resist eviction; Aurora Vargas was one of the last residents who refused to abandon her house, which led to her imprisonment in 1959.

The installation Aurora at the Museo Tamayo consists of two videos and two slide projections, all of which complement each other. The double-slide projection includes archival photographs and documents chosen by the artist to show the Chávez Ravine settlement from the 1940s and the territory as it exists today. The video shows eviction records of the last residents, including that of Aurora Vargas.

Lastly, the film Aurora is based on archival documents, excerpts from television broadcasts of the Chavez Ravine settlement, as well as newspaper articles and interviews with its former residents. Pia Ronicke combines this information to create a narrative that is read through a series of letters by the artist to Aurora, and which takes place at an indefinite time between 1959 and 2012. In this way the boundaries between fiction and reality are blurred as the documents and facts are presented within an imaginary structure.

These projects have been accomplished thanks to the support of Fundación Olga y Rufino Tamayo, Fundación Colección Jumex, Grupo Habita and the Danish Arts Council.

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October 30 2012

Ruta de Galerías, Mexico City

Ruta de Galerías is a new project that aims to promote the galleries located in the San Miguel Chapultepec and Tacubaya areas of Mexico City. The first event was held on September 29, 2012. On the occasion of this event, VTV correspondent Diego García Sotomoro visited two of the participating galleries, Galería Labor and Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura.

Galería Labor presents a solo show with works by Canadia artist Terence Gower, entitled Ottagono. Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura presents two shows: La felicidad es una esponja caliente (y fría) (Happiness is a hot (and cool) sponge), curated by Guillermo Santamarina, and Fonosistemas: hacia la portabilidad del sonido (Phonosystems: Towards sound portability), curated by Regina Pozo.

The galleries, participating in Ruta de Galerías are Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura, Casa Luis Barragán, Central Art Projects, Galería de Arte Mexicano, Gallé Antigüedades, Jan Mot, kurimanzutto, Labor, Estacionamientos San Miguel Chapultepec, and Fundación Alumnos47.

Ruta de Galerías: Galería Labor: Terence Gower; Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura: La felicidad es una esponja caliente (y fría) and Fonosistemas: hacia la portabilidad del sonido. Mexico City, September 29, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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Info about Ruta de Galerías in Spanish language:

Es un proyecto cultural que nace en 2012, cuyo objetivo es promover a las galerías ubicadas en las colonias San Miguel Chapultepec y Tacubaya como puntos de encuentro articulados a partir de un solo interés: estar juntos. Dicho acto facilitará los vínculos entre espacios, pensamiento y público para formar una comunidad entendida como dispositivo de interrogación, retroalimentación y futuras colaboraciones.

Dentro de ese perímetro, el público podrá desplazarse el 29 de septiembre para visitar galerías de arte contemporáneo, diseño y antigüedades que ofrecerán un presente disperso, en emergencia de algo: en el jardín de Archivo tocará Los Eclipses mientras que en Gallé las hermanas Rosenzweig presentarán su nueva publicación y a unas cuadras de ahí un grupo de amigos estará inmerso en la instalación de R. Tiravanija en la kurimanzutto.

En una palabra, esta sinergia generará una nueva forma de intercambio y producción de ideas en colectividad.

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October 11 2012

Rirkrit Tiravanija and Arto Lindsay at kurimanzutto, Mexico City

The current show at kurimanzutto gallery in Mexico City is a collaboration between the artists Rirkrit Tiravanija and Arto Lindsay. It’s a reproduction of the apartment and of most of the objects of the artist and musician Arto Lindsay. The exhibition invites the spectator to inhabit and activate the work. The exhibition is entitled Untitled 2012, (All those years at No. 17E London Terrace) and runs until November 3, 2012.

Untitled 2012, (All those years at No. 17E London Terrace). Rirkrit Tiravanija and Arto Lindsay at kurimanzutto, Mexico City. Opening reception, September 21, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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October 01 2012

Eduardo Terrazas at Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City

Mexico City’s art gallery Proyectos Monclova inaugurated its new space in Colonia with a solo show by Mexican artist Eduardo Terrazas. The gallery represents the artists Edgardo Aragón, Nina Beier, François Bucher, Mario Garcia Torres, Christian Jankowski, Nina Beier & Marie Lund, Eduardo Sarabia, Tercerunquinto, Eduardo Terrazas.

Eduardo Terrazas at Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City, September 5, 2012. Video: Diego García Sotomoro.

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August 30 2012

Reopening of Museum Tamayo, Mexico City

The Museo Tamayo in Mexico City reopened on August 26, 2012 after a major renovation and expansion of the museum. The expansion project was designed by Teodoro Gonzalez de Leon, one of the architects of the original building that was designed over 30 years ago. The Tamayo Museum openes with seven new exhibitions and projects organized by the museum’s curatorial team and guest curators.

Pierre Huyghe created a site-specific intervention titled El día del ojo in the museum’s sculpture patio; Ryan Gander presents an exhibition that is constructed around the artwork The Corridor by George Segal titled Boing, boing, squirt; Michael Stevenson shows a work titled New Math; the exhibition Tamayo / Trayectos is a retrospective exhibition focusing on the diverse ways in which Rufino Tamayo approached various classical art historical genres; the exhibition Tomorrow was already here is a group show that includes works by artists such as Dorit Margreiter, Pedro Reyes, Simon Starling, and Victor Vasarely; First Act is another group show that deals with the role of the Tamayo Museum itself; Finally, the Modulario provides complementary information about the exhibitions on show.

Reopening of Museum Tamayo, Mexico City. August 26, 2012. Video by Jacinto Astiazarán.

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August 13 2012

Surrealismo. Vasos Comunicantes at Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL), Mexico City

Surrealismo. Vasos Comunicantes (Surrealism. Communicating Vessels) at Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL) in México City presents more than 120 artworks from key figures of the Surrrealist art movement including paintings, photographs, sculptures and films. Surrealism. Communicating Vessels runs until September 15, 2012. The exhibition showcases works of artists such as Yves Tanguy, Man Ray, Max Ernst, René Magritte, Joan Miró, Salvador Dalí, Luis Buñuel, Gunther Gerzso, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Leonora Carrington, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo, María Izquierdo, among others.

Surrealismo. Vasos Comunicantes has been realized in collaboration with foreign collections such as the Centre Georges Pompidou and Mexican and foreign institutions and brings together works from institutional and private collections from Mexico, the U.S. and Europe. The title of the exhibition, Communicating Vessels, refers to the role of the Surrealist movement as a link between Europe and America.

Surrealismo. Vasos Comunicantes at Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL), México City. Opening reception, June 5, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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Excerpt from the website:
Partiendo de un principio hidrodinámico, formulado en la física de Pascal, los vasos comunicantes son recipientes comunicados entre sí, generalmente por su base. En cada uno de los continentes, el contenido alcanza el mismo volumen. Este principio fue reformulado por André Breton y es el concepto central que permite plantear en esta exposición los nexos entre artistas y pensadores europeos y americanos, definiendo al Surrealismo como una vanguardia que permitió que Europa y América alcanzaran el mismo nivel de enunciación en sus propuestas plásticas. Este principio físico nos permite mostrar el proceso por el que dos o más continentes, unidos entre sí, siempre aspirarán a tener el mismo nivel de importancia en una enunciación de muchas voces, ya que en la historiografía del arte, América permanece con frecuencia como el continente relegado. Ante los contactos de Breton y de otros surrealistas con un universo cultural distinto al suyo, ante la asimilación de los principios surrealistas elaborada por artistas latinoamericanos, planteamos que el Surrealismo es el tubo que une a los continentes (entendidos en ambos sentidos: el geográfico y el físico) y, por tanto, la vanguardia que le permite a América adquirir el mismo nivel de enunciación plástica que Europa.

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July 10 2012

Tribute to Edward Krasinski at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City

The group show En todo y en todas partes at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City is a tribute to the Polish avant-garde artist Edward Krasiński (1925–2004). The exhibition, curated by Polish curator Andrzej Przywara includes works by Karla Black, Marieta Chirulescu, Babette Mangolte, and Susanne M. Winterling.

Edward Krasiński was born in 1925 in Lutsk (Volhynia) into a Polish aristocratic family. The artist became known for his use of blue Scotch tape in his actions, sculptures and photo-based works from 1968 onwards. Krasiński pasted the 19 mm wide blue line around trees, walls, gallery windows, etc. Always running at the height of 130 cm.

En todo y en todas partes. Tribute to Edward Krasiński at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City. Opening reception, June 30, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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June 04 2012

Bridget Bate Tichenor. Retrospective at Museo de la Ciudad de México

The biography of Bridget Bate Tichenor reads like a who is who of the high society of the first half of the 20th Century, but only in recent years, her oeuvre as surrealist painter received attention after exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey in Mexico in 2008, and LACMA in Los Angeles in 2012. Now the Museo de la Ciudad de México (Museum of the City of Mexico) is presenting a solo exhibition with over 100 paintings, dedicated to Bridget Tichenor. The show runs until August 5, 2012.

Bridget Bate Tichenor was born in Paris in 1917 and attended schools in England, France, and Italy. At the age of 16 she moved to Paris, where she worked as a model for French Fashion designer Coco Chanel. She was subject for the photographers Man Ray, Cecil Beaton, Irving Penn, John Rawlings, and George Platt Lynes. Bridget Tichenor’s mother, who was reputedly descended of George III and had highest connections, was the public relations liaison to the royal families of Europe for Coco Chanel. After an arranged marriage Bridget Tichenor moved to New York where she was a student at the Art Students League of New York. In 1945, after the divorce from her first husband, she married Jonathan Tichenor, an assistant of photographer George Platt Lynes.

In 1953 she got divorced from her second husband, left her job as professional fashion and accessories editor for Vogue behind, and moved to Mexico, where she began her career as surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism. Her works were inspired by the experience of the diverse cultures she lived in, her interest in occult religions and esoteric sciences, and the Mexican mythos. Bridget Tichenor died in 1990 in Mexico City.

Bridget Bate Tichenor. Retrospective at Museo de la Ciudad de México. Opening reception, May 23, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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May 03 2012

Zona Maco Mexico Arte Contemporaneo Art Fair 2012, Mexico City

The 2012 edition of Zona Maco, the international art fair in Mexico that took place in mid-April at Centro Banamex in Mexico City, presented the program of more than 90 galleries from around the world. In addition to the Main Section of the fair that hosts galleries with more than five years of experience, the fair also has section for younger galleries, a project section, and Zona Maco Design, a pavilion that shows national and international design galleries. This video provides you with a walk-through of the fair on May 21, 2012.

Zona Maco Mexico Arte Contemporaneo Art Fair 2012, Mexico City. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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April 30 2012

Gabriel Kuri. Solo Exhibition at Galería Kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Gabriel Kuri is known for sculptures and collages that he creates from the remains of everyday purchases and objects such as tickets, cigarettes, body care products, slabs of marble, stones and other materials. Gabriel Kuri works with a variety of media, including installation, sculpture, collage, and photography. With his work, he explores questions about the current social order. This video provides you with a walk-through of his current exhibition at Kurimanzutto Gallery in Mexico City.

Gabriel Kuri studied at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas (ENAP) in Mexico City and at Goldsmith College in London. With his works, he has participated in numerous international group shows, such as the 54th Venice Biennale (2011) and the 5. Berlin Biennale (2008). Gabriel Kuri was born in Mexico in 1970. The artist lives and works in Mexico City and Brussels.

Gabriel Kuri. Solo Exhibition at Galería Kurimanzutto, Mexico City, April 19, 2012. Video by Diego García Sotomoro.

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April 25 2012

Tony Orrico Penwald Darwings Performance at Polyforum Siqueiros, Mexico City

Currently, Polyforum Siqueiros in Mexico City presents the third solo exhibition of Tony Orrico, titled CARBON, and curated by MARSO. Tony Orrico is a visual artist as well as a performer and choreographer. Orrico was a former member of Trisha Brown Dance Company and Shen Wei Dance Arts. He was chosen as one of the performers that re-performed Marina Abramovic’s work in her retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

In his work, Tony Orrico combines movement and drawing. His drawings are created by performances that he realizes either in his studio or live in front of an audience. His Penwald Darwings are “a series of bilateral drawings in which Tony Orrico explores the use of his body as a tool of measurement to inscribe geometries through movement and course. The master of each drawing is a conceptual score of Orrico’s efficacious techniques, imposed variables, and specified durations and/or objectives.” (Tony Orrico). Because of the geometric curves that he creates during his performances, he is sometimes called the “human spirograph”.

Tony Orrico’s three month solo exhibition takes place in a remarkable building that was designed by the Mexican social realist painter David Alfaro Siqueiros in the 1960s. The decagon shaped construction hosts the massive mural work called “La Marcha de la Humanidad”.

Tony Orrico: Fourths And Quarters (performance). Polyforum Siqueiros, Mexico City, April 19, 2012. Video by Jacinto Astiazarán.

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February 06 2012

Luis Felipe Ortega: Some Things Last a Long Time / Galeria Desiré Saint Phalle, Mexico City

Currently, Galeria Desiré Saint Phalle in Mexico City presents new works by Mexican artist Luis Felipe Ortega. Luis Felipe Ortega was born in 1966 in Mexico City, he lives and works in Mexico. Solo shows include Horizonte Invertido at El Clauselito, Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico (2010); Before the Horizon at Maison d’Art Actuel des Chartreux in Brussels (2006), and km96 at Kurimanzutto, Mexico City (2002). In 2011 he participated in group shows at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco; Polyforum Siqueiros, Mexico City; Muac, Mexico City; among others.

Desiré Saint Phalle Gallery was founded in 2010 in Mexico City, Mexico. Currently, the gallery represents the artists Cécile Bart, Rodolfo Díaz Cervantes, Jerónimo Hagerman, Ilán Lieberman, MoNDAo Corp., Jean-Luc Mouléne, Luis Felipe Ortega, Jean-Marie Perdix, Carlos Ranc, Marco Rountree Cruz.

Luis Felipe Ortega: Some Things Last a Long Time / Galeria Desiré Saint Phalle, Mexico City. Opening reception, February 4, 2012. By VernissageTV correspondent Jacinto Astiazarán.

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