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October 07 2013

Kuwait's Stateless Protest for Citizenship Rights

To mark the international day of non-violence, more than 3,000 protesters from the stateless community of Kuwait (Bedoon) marched to demand their rights to citizenship. The protest, which was covered by local civil groups and bedoon activists, took place in Taimaa area on October 2.

Inspired by the ousting of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, Kuwait's stateless community has been protesting since February 2011. Since then, activists from the community have been establishing different grassroots movements that focus on issues of citizenship, education, and poverty.

Bedoon means without in Arabic and explains the community's situation in a nutshell. Members of the community, estimated at 120,000, are denied access to healthcare, education, employment, and any sort of documentation.

Social media has revolutionized the means of communication and political dialogue among activists from the community but more importantly has contributed positively to the cause, gaining sympathizers from inside and outside Kuwait. As in other censored spaces, Twitter helps the Bedoon document violations committed against them – which are not covered by mainstream media. In fact, this protest was led and organized by an anonymous account called “A Nation's Cry” that was created last month to mobilize for the 2nd of October protest using the hashtag #اعتصام_2_أكتوبر, which translates to the October 2 Protest [ar].

هذا الحساب يدار عبر مجموعة من شباب الكويتيين البدون آمنوا بأن الحياة ماهي إلا وقفة عز وقرروا إكمال المشوار حتى اكتمال هذا العز وظهور الحق.

Q8voice1: This account is moderated by a group of Kuwaiti-Bedoon youth who believe in standing for dignity and who want to continue fighting until justice is gained.

Local Solidarity
Although Kuwaiti political groups have been reluctant in supporting the Bedoon cause, the political tension between opposition groups and authorities has been fruitful for the Bedoon. The political struggle helped kuwaiti political groups realize the importance of supporting the Bedoon in their demands. A few days before the protest, 21 political groups in Kuwait signed a statement that declares support to the October 2nd protest. The statement included three main demands: the Bedoon's right to peaceful protest, the necessity to find a final solution to their issue, and the importance of involving Kuwait's civil society in mapping out a solution for the community's longstanding issues.

In this regard, professor of political science at Kuwait University Mohammad Alwuhaib tweeted one day before the protest [ar]:

كم أتمنى أن أرى أعداد المواطنين غدا في تيماء تفوق أعداد البدون: هل بإمكان المواطن أن يتجرد من كل شيء إلا إنسانيته؟

@m_alwuhaib: I really wish to see more Kuwaiti citizens in Taimaa tomorrow than Bedoon protesters: citizens should maintain their sense of humanity.

Although only a small number of Kuwaitis showed up to the protest, one of them, who is a Kuwaiti political activist and poet, has led the march with his chants:

Tweeting the protest
Although the number of protesters was relatively big, the protest did not last more than a few hours, considering the attacks made against protesters by the riot police. Bedoon activist Falah althuwaini tweeted from the protest:

“@althuwaini: #stateless #bedoon groups are gathering in one large group near Najashi street in Taima in #Kuwait”

@althuwaini: Helicopter and riot forces in large number in Taima, so far they didn't storm the #Statelessness protesters.

“@althuwaini: #stateless #bedoon R marching from their city (for Bedoons only) Taima toward Naseem (city for Kuwaitis)”

Other accounts on Twitter were also posting updates from the protest, including this one who published a controversial picture which was widely circulated afterwards:

“@s_alshmmari: the police department's cameramen set fire to the garbage and videotape it to blame the bedoon for this act.”

Others documented the police crackdown on the protest:

“@Nashmiq8: Smoke bombs used against protesters.”

Because Bedoon women have been attacked by riot police in previous protests, many of them restrained from protesting. This picture shows balloons flying during the protests made by Bedoon women who want to show their support and presence – but could not attend the protest:

ballons 2oct

April 25 2013

Arabic Hashtag Trending Worldwide on Twitter

Arabic hash tags finally trending worldwide  on Twitter

Arabic hashtags finally trending worldwide on Twitter

Kuwaiti Hamad Al Sabah tweets:

@hmalsabah: Twitter is finally allowing Arabic hashtags to trend worldwide #كلام_مصري_مترجم pic.twitter.com/tb84Nkrk94

Netizens are using the hashtag, which translates to Egyptian Talk Translated, to translate Egyptian expressions and idioms.

April 04 2013

Kuwaiti Twitter User Jailed for Insulting Emir

On March 31, Hamad Al Khalidi (@HAMED_ALKHALDI) was sentenced to two years in prison by a Kuwaiti lower court for insulting the Emir of Kuwait on Twitter. He has already begun serving his sentence, though his attorneys plan to file an appeal on April 8.

Al Khalidi personally announced the sentence via Twitter:

تم الحكم على نواياي بالسجن سنتين مع الشغل والنفاذ !

Because of my opinions I'm sentenced to two years imprisonment with forced labour!

Hamad Al Khalidi (Image Credit: Courtesy: Al Aan)

Hamad Al Khalidi (Image Credit: Courtesy: Al Aan)

Al Kahlidi's lawyer, Jasser Aljade (@jasser_aljade) also tweeted right after the sentence was pronounced:
سأستأنف حكم حامد الخالدي بعد قليل وسنحدد جلسة استئناف في
أقرب فرصة ومتوقع تغيره بإذن الله
We are requesting an appeal hearing at the earliest opportunity and expect this sentence to change, God willing.

The Gulf News reports that the Kuwaiti government has broadened its crackdown on tweets that allegedly insult the leader of the Gulf nation:

Al Khalidi is one of dozens of opposition activists and former MPs who have either been sentenced to various jail terms or are on trial on similar charges…More than a dozen youth activists and former MPs have so far been handed down jail terms following a clamp-down on opposition social network users and activists. Criticising the emir is illegal in Kuwait and is considered to be an offence against state security.

February 20 2013

Targeted by Kuwaiti Police, Stateless Vlogger Calls it Quits

A video blogger known for documenting violence against stateless protesters in Kuwait has quit, writing on Twitter that authorities beat and coerced him to do so.

Under the nickname “حمقان البدون” meaning the “Angry Bedoon“, (Arabic for stateless), the blogger made a name for himself in his community for using footage of violence by riot police against stateless protesters to make videos on YouTube subtitled in English. Many of his videos were used by TV channels, being the only footage available documenting violence against stateless protesters.

His story was first reported by Alaan online newspaper with the title “The Bedoon's Minister of Information Resigns.” The move comes nearly three months after activist Abdulhakim al-Fadhli, who is on hunger strike, was sentenced to two years in jail for organizing protests using Twitter to mobilize demonstrations.

7mgan wrote the following tweets on February 11, making his farewell to cyber-activism:

لا أود الإسهاب بذكر ما حدث وحصل لي من قمع وضرب بسبب إحدى الجهات الحُكومية وتوقيعي على تعهدات وتبصيمي بعدم تصميم أي فيديو

@7MGAN: I do not want to elaborate in narrating what happened to me because of of repression and beating by one of the government bodies. They made me sign pledges to not make any more videos.

ويعلم الله بأني غيرت الأرقام السرية لقناة اليوتيوب منذ أسابيع وأنا مُغمض العينين لتبقى شاهدةٌ على ما حل بنا من ظُلم وقمع

@7MGAN: God is my witness to this: I changed the passwords to my YouTube channel with blind eyes weeks ago so it would stay an evidence to the injustice and oppression against us.

سامحوني يا بدون الكويت ! ويعلم الله أن الضغط فوق طاقتي فلقد وُضعت بزاوية ضيقة جداً وحمقان عاشق المظلومين لن ينساكم أبداً

@7MGAN: I hope the stateless of Kuwait would forgive me. This is out of my hand. I was put in a sensitive position but “the angry Bedoon, lover of the oppressed” will never forget you.

January 22 2013

Kuwait: Stateless Activist Goes on Hunger Strike

On January 16, stateless activist Abdulhakim AlFadhli entered hunger strike in prison right after getting a two-year jail sentence. The court charged the activist with attacking a policeman in a protest last March. The activist stated that this charge, among others, is fabricated against him because of his political activism in demanding the rights of Kuwait's stateless community. AlFadhli was arrested earlier last month with his brother Abdulnasser AlFadhli, who was acquitted in the same case and released. Here is a translated excerpt of his statement, as published by Jadaliyya:

At 7p.m. on 16 January 2013, I officially announce from this freedom cell in Kuwait's Central Jail that I will go on an indefinite hunger strike in protest of the injustice and the cases fabricated unfairly against me by the security system. They are trying to destroy my life, reputation, future, and freedom. They are torturing me to force me to stop my activism for the cause of the stateless of Kuwait. I will not stop my hunger strike until: 1) I am released;
2) Cases fabricated against me are dropped; 3) The formation of a national nonpartisan committee to investigate cases of kidnapping, arrests, torture, and fabrications against activists, including my own case.
Most probably, this will be my last message to you for the time being as I am sure there will be repercussions after this message is released to the media and the public. I know I will be put into solitary confinement, away from the light of the sun and people, to punish me for exercising my right to defend my freedom through a hunger strike.

Right after his statement, the community protested in Taimaa area against the jail sentence. Here are some photographs from the protest shared on Twitter:

(Posted by @HumanRightsKW)

(Posted by @a_miyah)

A protester wearing a T-shirt with the activist's picture and his famous line “Do not give up your right” (posted by @robn_hod)

Twitter users in Kuwait have been posting messages of solidarity with AlFadhli. An account dedicated to human rights in Kuwait posted the following video in which AlFadhli was interviewed:

لهذا سجن عبدالحكيم الفضلي سنتين… تقرير عن قمع الكويتيين البدون وحديث لعبدالحكيم…

@rightskw: This video is why AlFadhli got two years in jail. It is a report about repression of Bedoon [stateless] in which Abdulhakim was interviewed

Stateless activist Ahmed AlAounan wrote:

يدخل معتقلنا البطل عبدالحكيم الفضلي يومه السادس من إضرابه عن الطعام وسط تردي وضعه الصحي وصمت مؤسسات المجتمع المدني صمود ياحر

@ahmedal3onan: Our detainee the hero Abdulhakim AlFadhli is entering his sixth day in hunger strike as his health condition gets worse and NGOs keep silent. Solidarity with this free man.

Another activist reported AlFadhli's health condition:

للتو تأكدت أن عبدالحكيم الفضلي سقط مغشياً عليه داخل الزنزانة وقام المساجين بطلب الامن وتم اسعافه الى عيادة السجن لاضرابة لليوم الخامس

@alnssar1: I just got confirmed news that AlFadhli fainted in his cell, other prisoners called the security, and he was taken to the prison clinic after 5 days of hunger strike.

وهو يعاني من آلام بسبب الاضراب الحاد وتحديداً في الكلى اليسرى وهو الان في عيادة السجن

@alnssar1: He suffers because of his hunger strike especially in his left kidney. He is still in the prison clinic.

Several others, reacting to the activist's health condition, called on him to stop his strike:

أنا فلاح الثويني .. أناشد عبدالحكيم الفضلي أن يتوقف عن الإضراب عن الطعام

@althuwaini: I am Falah AlThuwaini. I call on Abdulhakim AlFadhli to stop his hunger strike.

أناشد عبدالحكيم الفضلي أن يتوقف عن الإضراب عن الطعام نحتاج لأمثالك للدفاع عن القضية الانسانية الاولى

@Fatma_alhayyan: I call on Abdulhakim AlFadhli to stop his hunger strike. We need people like you to defend the no. 1 human rights cause here.

Another Twitter user wrote in solidarity:

كم موجع هذا الصمت ياشعب الكويت ! كم موجع هذا الصمت يامن تقرأ هذه التغريدة ! #عبدالحكيم_الفضلي في السجن ويؤلمه هذا الصمت وهو مضرب عن الطعام

@Nietzsche69k: How painful this silence is, Kuwaiti people! How painful this silence, you who read this tweet! Abdulhakim AlFadhli is in jail and is suffering in pain because of this silence as he hunger strikes.

After a few days, a Twitter user named “Anonymous Stateless” started a hashtag for AlFadhli's case:

@AnonStateless: #Kuwait #stateless activist @Hakeemq80 lost consciousness after 5 days of hunger strike. spread hashtag #SaveHakeem

January 11 2013

Kuwaiti Twitter User Jailed for Two Years for Insulting Emir

Seven months after the sentencing a Twitter user to five years in jail for defaming the Emir of Kuwait, another Twitter user Ayyad Al-Harbi was sentenced this Monday to two years in jail for the same charge. Al-Harbi wrote several tweets critical of the Emir and the oppression practiced against protesters. According to the court order (published by Sabr online), the tweets Ayyad was prosecuted for contain the following lines:

- Damn any ruler who jails his people. Damn any ruler that has more opposition than supporters.
- Your highness, the best unity between Kuwaitis happened in Erada square and you targeted it.
- What is left? no revolution, no development, no freedom, no dignity, no parliament, no voting, no protests, no objection, for God's sake, what are you doing to us?
- So I should either insult and accuse people of things with no proof and say it is freedom or I should say my account is hacked and get released?
- If you are not Kuwaiti, then you are from the Gulf. You will face the oppression and tyranny and arrests with a bit of oil.
- The tyrant and oppressor should not be apologized to, he should fall down and be on trial and jailed and killed.
- Curse the state that does not stop its dogs from eating the dignity of its people just because they are opposing.

Al-Harbi was also charged for retweeting a poem by Iraqi poet Ahmed Matar critical of dictators. The tweep also wrote a tweet when the Emir left to Jordan saying:

Since he left to Amman for fishing, the children sang for rain after the adults were singing “beating the people has become a norm.”

Right after his sentence was announced, Al-Harbi tweeted his last tweet:

أحبّــــّــّــك .. يا وطن !

@ayyadQ8Q8: I love you, my country!

Al-Harbi posted on the 6th of January that he is facing three charges:

غداً صباحاً النطق بمحاكمتي على تهم أمن الدولة ( الطعن بالذات الأميرية / نشر أخبار كاذبة بالخارج / إساءة إستخدام هاتف ) لا تحرمونا من دعائكم

@ayyadQ8Q8: Tomorrow morning, the court verdict on my case will be made regarding charges made by the state security: defaming the Emir, spreading false news abroad, and misusing a cellphone. Your prayers matter.

Twitter users from Kuwait and other countries wrote critically of having such a sentence that violates one's right to free speech. Ayyad's friend Hussain Al-Shammari posted Ayyad's picture with a comment:

قبل يومين أخرج لي عياد الحربي السلاح الخاص الذي حُكم عليه بالسجن بسببه ، كان عبارة عن 140 حرف وأحلام ممتدة للسماء !
“@Havana_H : Two days ago, Ayyad Al-Harbi showed me his special weapon which got him two years in jail.. it was 140 letters and dreams that reach the sky.”

Sabr online newspaper posted a picture of Ayyad's Kuwaiti passport in reaction to those accusing him of being Saudi citizen:

Egyptian activist Gamal Eid commented in solidarity:

صديقنا وزميلنا عياد الحربي من الكويت ، حتى أمس كان يغرد معنا ، والان اضيف لقائمة سجناء الرأي رقم جديد !!

@gamaleid: Our friend and colleague Ayyad al-Harbi from Kuwait was with us tweeting until yesterday and has become now a new number in the list of prisoners of conscience.

Monther alhabeeb, from Kuwait, who was arrested before in a protest, wrote a tweet after Ayyad's sentence and about the other detainees in Kuwait Rashed Al-Enizi and Salam Al-Rujaib, who were arrested in the latest opposition rally, and Bedoon [stateless] activist Abdulhakim Al-Fadhli:

كل دقيقة لكم في الزنازين تستنشقون بها حريتكم، هي تمر علينا كالساعات نتجرع بها الإنكسار. الحربي العنزي الرجيب الفضلي

@Montheralhabeeb: In every minute passing while you're in jail, you breathe your freedom. Those minutes pass like hours for us as we taste grief.

January 10 2013

Kuwaiti Twitter User Jailed for Two Years for Insulting Emir

Seven months after the sentencing a Twitter user to five years in jail for defaming the Emir of Kuwait, another Twitter user Ayyad Al-Harbi was sentenced this Monday to two years in jail for the same charge. Al-Harbi wrote several tweets critical of the Emir and the oppression practiced against protesters. According to the court order (published by Sabr online), the tweets Ayyad was prosecuted for contain the following lines:

- Damn any ruler who jails his people. Damn any ruler that has more opposition than supporters.
- Your highness, the best unity between Kuwaitis happened in Erada square and you targeted it.
- What is left? no revolution, no development, no freedom, no dignity, no parliament, no voting, no protests, no objection, for God's sake, what are you doing to us?
- So I should either insult and accuse people of things with no proof and say it is freedom or I should say my account is hacked and get released?
- If you are not Kuwaiti, then you are from the Gulf. You will face the oppression and tyranny and arrests with a bit of oil.
- The tyrant and oppressor should not be apologized to, he should fall down and be on trial and jailed and killed.
- Curse the state that does not stop its dogs from eating the dignity of its people just because they are opposing.

Al-Harbi was also charged for retweeting a poem by Iraqi poet Ahmed Matar critical of dictators. The tweep also wrote a tweet when the Emir left to Jordan saying:

Since he left to Amman for fishing, the children sang for rain after the adults were singing “beating the people has become a norm.”

Right after his sentence was announced, Al-Harbi tweeted his last tweet:

أحبّــــّــّــك .. يا وطن !

@ayyadQ8Q8: I love you, my country!

Al-Harbi posted on the 6th of January that he is facing three charges:

غداً صباحاً النطق بمحاكمتي على تهم أمن الدولة ( الطعن بالذات الأميرية / نشر أخبار كاذبة بالخارج / إساءة إستخدام هاتف ) لا تحرمونا من دعائكم

@ayyadQ8Q8: Tomorrow morning, the court verdict on my case will be made regarding charges made by the state security: defaming the Emir, spreading false news abroad, and misusing a cellphone. Your prayers matter.

Twitter users from Kuwait and other countries wrote critically of having such a sentence that violates one's right to free speech. Ayyad's friend Hussain Al-Shammari posted Ayyad's picture with a comment:

قبل يومين أخرج لي عياد الحربي السلاح الخاص الذي حُكم عليه بالسجن بسببه ، كان عبارة عن 140 حرف وأحلام ممتدة للسماء !
“@Havana_H : Two days ago, Ayyad Al-Harbi showed me his special weapon which got him two years in jail.. it was 140 letters and dreams that reach the sky.”

Sabr online newspaper posted a picture of Ayyad's Kuwaiti passport in reaction to those accusing him of being Saudi citizen:

Egyptian activist Gamal Eid commented in solidarity:

صديقنا وزميلنا عياد الحربي من الكويت ، حتى أمس كان يغرد معنا ، والان اضيف لقائمة سجناء الرأي رقم جديد !!

@gamaleid: Our friend and colleague Ayyad al-Harbi from Kuwait was with us tweeting until yesterday and has become now a new number in the list of prisoners of conscience.

Monther alhabeeb, from Kuwait, who was arrested before in a protest, wrote a tweet after Ayyad's sentence and about the other detainees in Kuwait Rashed Al-Enizi and Salam Al-Rujaib, who were arrested in the latest opposition rally, and Bedoon [stateless] activist Abdulhakim Al-Fadhli:

كل دقيقة لكم في الزنازين تستنشقون بها حريتكم، هي تمر علينا كالساعات نتجرع بها الإنكسار. الحربي العنزي الرجيب الفضلي

@Montheralhabeeb: In every minute passing while you're in jail, you breathe your freedom. Those minutes pass like hours for us as we taste grief.

December 29 2012

MENA: Acclaimed Authors’ Favorites of 2012

M. Lynx Qualey, blogger, who is interested in Arab and Arabic literature, wrote a series of posts introducing acclaimed Arab poets, novelists, and short-story writers’ favorite Arab reads of 2012. She started with a list of nonfiction books, then followed by a list for poetry [En] and fiction [En].

December 23 2012

Jailed Kuwait Stateless Activist Tweets Torture Ordeal

Over the past two years, people outside the Gulf, have been exposed to the issue of statelessness in the region as the Bedoon (which translates to without in Arabic) communities protest for their rights to education, health, employment, and most importantly, their right to citizenship. The Bedoon of Kuwait have been the most outspoken in the Gulf, protesting in their areas to raise awareness for their plight. More than 230 of them have been arrested and charged with illegal protesting since the Arab Spring started.

Last October, Kuwait witnessed one of the biggest Bedoon protests on the international day of non-violence. In that protest, in Taimaa area, a protester named Abdullatif Ajil Al-Shammari was shot in the eye and is trying right now raising money for a surgery that might save his eye in France. The same protest was mainly organized by prominent Bedoon activist Abdulhakim Al-Fadhli, who is now in Kuwait's Central jail.

Picture of activist Abdulhakim Al-Fadhli in court (posted by @7raak)

According to Bedoon Rights, the activist was arrested after his brother Abdulnasser was taken. The website published this picture of a protest in Taimaa on the 12th of December that called for the release of the Al-Fadhli brothers.

Bedoon protesting for the freedom of the two activists - Bedoon Rights

Jail and Deportation!
According to their lawyer, Bedoon Rights reports that the brothers were taken after a court verdict of “two years in jail and a deportation order” was issued against them. The verdict was made in absentia for case number 357/2012, which accused them of attacking a policeman in a protest last March. The policeman has actually cancelled the case against the two activists but authorities pushed the case to punish the two activists for their leading role in organizing protests in the past two years.

Tweeting about Torture
On December the 13th, Abdulhakim Al-Fadhli's account on Twitter had new updates about the way he and his brother were arrested. Al-Fadhli spoke also of the way they were arrested. It seems that Al_Fadhli is tweeting his ordeal and that of his brother's - from jail.

Here are the tweets:

‏عاجل عاجل/من داخل السجن المركزي صباح الخير بعد قليل سأقوم بكتابة تفاصيل ماحدث معي انا وأخي عبدالناصر وكيفية اعتقالنا وماتعرضنا له من تعذيب!

@Hakeemq80: Urgent from the Central jail: Good morning, in a bit, I will write to you the details of what happened to me and my brother Abdulnasser and how we were arrested and tortured.

اولا سأحكي تفاصيل اختطاف أخي تم اختطاف عبدالناصر في يوم الأحد مساءا واعترضته سيارات المباحث في صباح السالم وكان عددهم أكثر من ٨ أشخاص

@Hakeemq80: First I will write how my brother was kidnapped on Sunday evening (9th of December) and was blocked by state police cars in Sabah AlSalem area. The police men were more than eight.

وقاموا شبيحة الحمود بأنزال أخي من مركبتة وقيدوه بالكلبشات واقتادوه الى مخفر الصليبية وهناك قاموا بتعذيبة وضربة لرفضه اعطاهم معلومات عني

@Hakeemq80: The thugs of [interior minister] Al-Humood got my brother out of his car, handcuffed him and took him to Sulaibiya police station and tortured him there and beat him to give them information about me.

ومارسو معه جميع ادوات التعذيب من (شواية وفلقه) وشددو بضربهم على اماكن حساسه بجسمه لمدة ٢٤ ساعة ومنعوا عنه الاكل والشراب

@Hakeemq80: They tortured him with different methods such as burning and falaqa. They also focused on beating him in sensitive parts of his body for 24 hours and did not allow him to eat or drink.

وبعد ما اسأت حالة أخي عبدالناصر الصحية من قبل شبيحة احمد الحمود لتعذيبهم له قاموا بتحويله الى مباحث الجنائية وهناك اتضح أن عليه حكم سنتان

@Hakeemq80: When my brother Abdulnasser's health deteriorated because of all the torture, AlHumood's thugs took him to the criminal investigations where he was told that he has a two years jail sentence.

قاموا بتحويله الى السجن المركزي وهو الان بجانبي حالته الصحية سيئة من شدة الضرب والتشوهات الكثيره في جسمه من كثرة التعذيب الذي مارسوها معه

@Hakeemq80: He was sent to the Central Jail and now he is next to me in a bad shape because of the beating and has different deformed areas in his body because of the torture.

والأن سأحكي لكم تفاصيل اختطافي تمت مراقبتنا منذ خروجنا من الاعتصام الذي كان في تيماء يوم الثلاثاء لحين وصولنا الى النفق اللي بصليبية

@Hakeemq80: Now I will write details of how I got kidnapped. I was tracked since I left the protest in Taimaa on Tuesday until we got to the tunnel in Sulaibiya area.

وبعدها دخلنا النفق وقاموا بتسكير النفق علينا من امامنا وخلفنا بمركباتهم ونزلوا علينا حاملين أسلحتهم وقاموا بأنزالنا من مركبتنا

@Hakeemq80: We got into the tunnel and they closed the tunnel from the front and back with their cars. They came to us with their guns and took us from our car.

واسقطونا ارضاً ووضعوا أسلحتهم على رؤوسنا وقاموا بتكبيلنا وربطوا عيوننا “بالشماغ” ومن ثم توجهوا بنا الى مخفر الصليبية وهناك مارسو معي الضرب

@Hakeemq80: They put us on the ground, pointed their guns to our heads, handcuffed us and blindfolded us, and took us to Sulaibiya police station and beat me there.

والتعذيب لعدم تسليم نفسي والتحريض المتكرر للاعتصاماتنا وقالوا لي حرفياً ( راح نوديك ورا الشمس ) !! ولكن اراهن عليكم

@Hakeemq80: They tortured me for not turning myself in and for calling for protests. They told me “we will send you behind the sun” [a police expression in Arabic for threatening extreme punishment]. But I count on you.

ولكن اراهن عليكم يا أخوتي وعزوتي “البدون” بأنكم ماراح تخلون حقكم وأستمروا بحراكم السلمي ولا توقفكم تهديدات الاجهزة القمعية وترهيبهم لكم

@Hakeemq80: I count on you my Bedoon brothers. I bet you will not let go of your right and that you will keep your peaceful struggle. Do not let police oppression scare you.

The activists are set to meet a judge on the 26th of December for an appeal.

December 01 2012

Kim Kardashian Does Kuwait and Bahrain

Kim Kardashian completed a visit to Kuwait and is now visiting Bahrain. Here's Brian Whitaker's take on her visit.

November 29 2012

Kuwait: Who is Dumping Garbage Outside My Home?

Empty plot of land turned into garbage dumpster

Empty plot of land turned into garbage dumpster

Mark from Kuwait complains about an empty plot of land behind his home is being turned into a garbage dump. (more…)

November 17 2012

Why is the GCC Quiet about Gaza?

“Gulf countries awfully quiet about Gaza,” tweets Foreign Policy editor Blake Hounshell. Lebanese journalist Antoun Issa adds:

@antissa: Amazing how eager GCC are to arm Arabs to fight each other, while disappearing completely when it comes to Palestine. #Gaza

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) is made up of Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

November 13 2012

Arab World: What will Change with Obama's Re-Election?

Barack Obama has won a second term as US President but how does he fare among netizens across the Arab world? Here's a snippet of the conversation on Twitter following his re-election. Reactions were divided and while many were not pleased with the US foreign policy in the region, others were happy Obama won.

Saudi Essam Al Zamil pulls the conspiracy theories from the hat. He writes [ar]:

إسرائيل كانت تفضل فوز رومني. رغم ذلك خسر. غريبة!! ما كانوا يقولون إن إسرائيل والصهاينة يتحكمون العالم ويحركوننا كأننا بيادق على رقعة شطرنج؟!

@essamz: Israel preferred [Mitt] Romney winning. Despite this, he lost. Strange!!! Weren't they saying that Israel and the Zionists controlled the world and moved us as if we were chess pieces?

Egyptian Gigi Ibrahim wonders how Obama's reaction [praising his wife and daughters] after his win would be received has he been an Arab president:

@Gsquare86: Obama telling Michelle how he loves her publicly and speaking to his daughters haha imagine Morsi or any egy pres doing that

And Kuwaiti Al Saqar shares a similar thought:

اوباما يحتضن زوجته بعد الفوز بالرئاسة وربعنا يفوز بانتخابات جمعية يتزوج على مرته !! هههههههههههه

@alsaqar_87: Obama hugs his wife after he wins the presidential elections while our friends take a second wife if they win a society election!! haha

Kuwaiti politician Dr Aseel Al Awadhi pays tribute to Obama's victory speech:

خطاب اوباما بعد اعلان فوزه يجب ان يدرس كمادة اساسية لكل القيادات العربية. نستورد منهم كل شئ ليش ما نستورد نوعية خطابهم السياسي؟

@AseelAlawadhi: Obama's speech after his victory was announced should be taught as an essential subject for all Arab leaders. We import everything from them so why don't we also import their political addresses?

And using tongue in cheek, Syrian Bint Al Rifai pays tribute to Obama's administration:

@BintAlRifai: Obama admin… Mastering the art of lip service

Egyptian Raafat Roheim tries reason, saying the US foreign policy does not change with the change of a president:

الناس العبيطة اللي مفكره أن سياسة أمريكا الخارجيه هتتغير لو رومني فاز، والنبي آتوكسو. لو كيم كارداشين بقت الرئيس السياسه مش هتتغير يا مواشي


@Raafatology:
Stupid people think the US foreign policy would have changed had [Mitt] Romney won. Even if Kim Kardashian became president, their policy won't change.

Egyptian journalist Ayman Mohyeldin remarks:

@AymanM: 2 years of campaigning, billions of dollars spent, obama wins, democrats control senate, republicans run house but will it change anything?

While Jordanian Naseem Tarawnah jokes about Obama's Islamic links:

@tarawnah: If President Obama thanks Allah during his victory speech he will freak everyone out. EVERYONE.

Meanwhile, Jordanian Fadi Zaghmout offers his support to Obama:

@ArabObserver: As a world citizen, I would vote for Obama in the #USElection #ivoted

He adds:

@ArabObserver: Thank you my Americans friends who voted for sanity yesterday. This is a win for all of us. Congratulations!

And Egyptian Nadia El-Awady wishes America good luck:

@NadiaE: Nice to wake up this morning to the news of #Obama's win. Good luck, America.

November 10 2012

Anonymous Twitter Account Leads Major Protests in Kuwait

After witnessing its biggest protest, the anonymous organizers of the “Dignity March” called for another one. Tens of thousands showed up in the areas of Mishref and Sabah Al-Salem protesting the Kuwaiti ruler's amendment of the voting law, which now allows a citizen to vote for one candidate instead of four. Protesters did not find the Amir's decree constitutional and believe the new law is made to play with the coming elections in December and to weaken the opposition that won most of the parliament's seats earlier this year. Like the previous march, Sunday's [Nov. 4, 2012] protest witnessed smoke and tear gas bombs and several arrests of protesters, who were later released.

Who is leading the protests?
In the past few years, protests were criticized because they were led by opposition MPs. Lately, the youth tried to be the leaders of those protests. This shift got bigger numbers to show up for those dignity marches. What is interesting though is that an anonymous Twitter account is the one deciding dates of both marches and the meeting points.
The account @KarametWatan [Arabic for Dignity of a Nation] tweeted a message on the 24th of October to Twitter not to revel their identity to the Kuwaiti authorities:

We the people of Kuwait ask you to protect the privacy of our account details of @karametwatan from all/any officials seeking the information of the owners and/or IP addresses of the persons using and posting from the mentioned account. We are responsible for the organization of a march called “Dignity of a Nation” in Kuwait, the largest ever march in the history of Kuwait calling for democracy, human rights, and fight against corruption. The turn-out reached over 150,000 (around 11.5% of citizens of Kuwait) that stunned the government. In return the government ordered their forces to attack the peaceful demonstration in a brutal manner that was never been seen before for no reason. Over 100 people were injured and over 50 were detained in an unlawful manner. We do not feel safe and your protection of our privacy is pivotal.

In a comment on having a Twitter account organizing those major marches, Hamad Al-Sabah wrote:

@hmalsabah: Am I the only one that is uneasy about the fact that thousands of people in #Kuwait are obeying the commands of some anonymous Twitter acct?

Should Bahrainis support Kuwaitis?
Considering the sectarian remarks and support of Kuwaiti opposition figures for the Bahraini regime against the February 14th revolution, the Shia of Kuwait do not want to protest next to the opposition. This, in result, influenced the Shia of Bahrain and started a discussion on whether Bahrainis should or should not support Kuwaiti marches. In comment on this topic, Bahraini Human Rights Defender Maryam AlKhawaja wrote:

@MARYAMALKHAWAJA: yes, i support anyone with righteous demands regardless of whether they support mine or not.

@MARYAMALKHAWAJA: there r many of whom supported the bahrain protests who r taking part in the kuwaiti protests as well. but thats not the point

Another Bahraini activist, Ahmed Al-haddad, from the European-Bahraini Organization for Human Rights wrote [ar]:

اذ كنت تعتقد بأن لك الحق بتصوير الحراك الكويتي على أنه أخونجي وطائفي اذا يحق لغيرك تصوير حراكك بالشيعي الطائفي

@DiabloHaddad: If you think you have the right to consider the Kuwaiti struggle as of Muslim Brotherhood and sectarian, then others have the right to consider yours [Bahraini struggle] as Shia and sectarian too.

Other objections
Aside from the sectarian conflict, there were others who showed objection to the current protests. Hamad Al-Sabah, who thinks the coming parliament can solve this crisis instead of protests, tweeted:

@hmalsabah: Let me reiterate that I believe that the protesters have a just cause, but I don't support their methods. It can easily be solved peacefully

In reply, Fawaz Al-Matroud wrote:

@FawazAM: people often mistake mob rule and political freedom. Just because lots of people break the law together, doesn't make them right.

As for blogger “His & Hers”, he tweeted:

@HisHersQ8: The Amir has a point when it came to illegal protests. Democracies all around the world stops any illegal protests

Liberal tweep Khaled AJaser tweeted:

@k_jaser: i hope the stockpile of tear gas & sound bombs are limitless here in #Kuwait for there is no other way of dealing with this lawlessness.

Pictures and videos of the protest

Crowds getting tear gassed (posted on Twitter by @Fajoor)

Picture of security vehicles heading towards protesting points (posted by blogger alziadiq8)

One of the protesters with her sign (posted by blogger alziadiq8)

And this photograph, which was shared far and wide, showing a protester, helping a security personnel, who was effected by the tear-gas:

Picture of a protester helping a security man who was effected by tear gas (posted by @AboShla5Libraly)

Footage of the protest in Mishref area (posted by saad971)

Another footage showing bombs, injuries, and marches (posted by 7eyad)

Video of the protest in Sabah Al-Salem area (posted by KharjAlsrb)

Did Jordanians crackdown on Kuwaitis?
Weeks ago, an anonymous Twitter user named Mujtahidd tweeted about Jordan sending troops to repress Kuwaiti protesters. The popular and controversial Twitter user got Salafi MP Walid AlTabtabai to tweet the news. Yesterday, in the protest, former MP and opposition frontman Musalam Al-Barrak gave a controversial speech. The MP was jailed last week for defaming the Amir but got released in two days due to the big protests that took place in his support.

In this video, Al-Barrak says: “Security men are our brothers. If they beat you, do not react. But if they are Jordanian or Palestinian security men, then we will step on them.”

In reaction, Jordan's foreign ministry made a statement denying the accusations.

The Amir's reply
Due to the major protests, people were expecting the Amir to take back his decree that stirred all those marches. However, the Amir made a speech on Monday stating that he will not take his decision back and that he leaves it for the coming parliament to amend the voting law. He also added that he has the support of GCC countries in keeping the security of his country. Here's the video of his speech (posted by blogger AlZiadiq8)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujOw7QlkL6k

October 23 2012

Egypt: Advice to Protesting Kuwaitis

As Kuwaitis embarked on their largest ever protest to denounce changes to the electoral law, passed by the country's hereditary ruler while the Parliament was dissolved, Egyptians kept themselves busy on Twitter, dishing advice to them on what to do and not to do.

Samah Anwar tackles the dress code of Kuwaiti men, who wear a long flowing gown called a thobe. She tweets [ar]:

لبس الجلبيات ده مينفعش خالص ف الثورات

@samahanwar: Wearing a thobe is not suitable for revolutions

In another tweet, she uses reason:

ماتجبوش الخراب لبلدكم انتو عايشين كويس واحمدو ربنا غيركم مش لاقي العيش

@samahanwar: Don't destroy your country. You are living well. Thank God for your blessings. Other people aren't able to live

Many Egyptians echoed similar sentiments. Ebrahim Elkhadm writes [ar]:

#نصيحة_مصرية_للكوايته.. تبقوا ولاد مره لو سمعتوا كلامنا .. ده احنا اساسا معرفناش ننصح نفسنا بلا هبل

@ebrahimelkhadm: You would be losers if you listen to us. We don't even know how to advice ourselves. Let's not be stupid

Elshazli adds:

ركزوا فى كل كلمة مكتوبة فى الهاشتاج دا واعملوا عكسها هتلاقوا ثورتكم نجحت

@El_Shazli: Focus on every word written under this hash tag and do its opposition. You will discover that your revolution has become a success

Egyptians advise protesting Kuwaitis on Twitter

Egyptians advise protesting Kuwaitis on Twitter. Kuwaiti Naser AlMufarrij shares this screenshot on Twitter


And Kuwaiti Naser AlMufarrij shares this screenshot of a tweet, which reads in Arabic:

Why would you have a revolution when the youngest child amongst you is richer than an Egyptian minister?

Many Egyptians used the opportunity to joke about their own revolution, like Gepril Thuwaiba who tweets:

قبل ما تتحركوا المره اللى جايه كل واحد يتفق مع صحابه ..بعد المسيره مفيش كلام ولا جدال والا الفراق

@Gepril1: Before you take to the streets next time, everyone should agree with his friends. After the march, don't talk, argue and part ways

And he adds:

هما ثلاث خطابات لو حصل مبروك عليكوا متنسوناش بعد الفرحه الكبيره كام برميل كده ع الماشى احسن الحاله ضنك

@Gepril1: There are only three speeches [in reference to Mubarak's three speeches before leaving power]. If that happens, then congratulations! After your big celebration, don't forget us. Remember us with a few barrels [of oil] as our circumstances are dire

Kuwaitis were also quick to point out that the protests in Kuwait were just that - protests and not a revolution. Barcelonya explains:

دي مش ثورة دا احتجاج يا اخوانا

@Barcelonya: This isn't a revolution. It is a protest.

But Mona Abo Elyazeed is adamant in her advice and shares one thought:

@MonaAbo: no compromise

Kuwait: The Country's Biggest Protest?

Tear gas and stun grenades were used to disperse a protest in Kuwait against changes to the electoral law. The call for the Karamat Watan (A Nation's Dignity) march, which took place on Sunday, was made on Twitter, and attracted about 150,000 out of the country's population of 3 million. Media outlets considered this number to be the biggest in the small Gulf emirate's history.

The protest came in reaction to the Amir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah decree to change the electoral law, making a citizen vote for one candidate instead of four, as it used to be in the elections of Kuwaiti parliament. The protest was not only an objection for making such a change but more importantly to protest the change of a law without the parliament or the people having their say in it. Since last June, Kuwaiti parliament has been frozen by the Amir and then dissolved by the constitutional court for ‘wrong procedures' in dissolving the parliament before it.

The opposition has been protesting since but was never able to gather such a huge crowd; even the liberal “Tahalof” and Pan-Arabist “Manbar” took part in Sunday's demonstration despite their disagreement with the Islamist-Conservative opposition.

In a unique step, this demonstration was organized through Twitter. The account @KarametWatan [ar] (which translates to A Nation's Dignity) was started to call for the protest. It suggested an orange avatar (in reference to the 2006 youth movement that changed the electoral law from 25 districts to 5), and organized the meeting points with the following map:

The protest route

The protest route shared by @KarametWatan on Twitter

As usual, Kuwaitis used Twitter to post pictures and videos of the protest. Here are some of the pictures:

One of the signs the police asked its holder to drop

On Twitter, @NforNaser says the police asked him to drop this sign or else they would beat him up. The sign reads: Believe in the people; disbelieve in the system.

Picture of the crowds marching posted by @nourah_ibrahim

A protester with a head injury (photo posted by @BuNaWaFF)

Another injured protester with his feet cuffed (posted by @3asalaswad)

Protesters running away from tear gas bombs (posted by @JanarlySpeaking)

To show the numbers, crowds, and chants, this video was posted on YouTube by Q8jo7a:

Here is another video of the crowds marching, from a distance, posted by jozifanto:

Blogger Alziadi posted this video showing protesters running from the tear gas bombs:

On Monday [Oct 22], Sabr Online Newspaper reported that all detained protesters have been released:

@Sabrnews: عاجل/ إطلاق سراح جميع معتقلي مسيرة “كرامة وطن

Urgent: All those arrested in the Nation's Dignity march have been released

October 20 2012

Kuwait: “Demonstration will be met with Force”

Anti-government protests are planned in Kuwait tomorrow. Ahmad Al Kandare tweets [ar]:

@AhmadAlkandare: Kuwaiti foreign minister: “We call upon the Syrian regime not to oppress and prevent peaceful demonstrations.” The Government of Kuwait: “Tomorrow's demonstration is prohibited and will be faced with force.”

October 04 2012

Kuwait: Shotgun Used Against Stateless Protesters

On the International Day of Non-Violence, the stateless community of Kuwait decided to protest to demand their right to citizenship. The community has been protesting, on and off, since February 2011. Over the past two years, the self-acclaimed ‘Gulf democracy' has arrested more than 200 protesters, put them on trial, fabricated charges against them, and then acquitted them. This Tuesday, the protest was different as it attracted more than 3,000 protesters, foreign media, and several NGOs.

In the past weeks, the protesters were way smaller, comparatively, of a community estimated to be about 120,000 of Kuwait's 3 million population. Bedoon translates to without - and in this case refers to Kuwaitis with no official documents like passports and ID cards.

According to Bedoon Rights, the security forces used rubber bullets, smoke bombs, tear gas, sound bombs, and for the first time shotguns. Confirmed news say Abdulatif Al-Nabhan was shot in his eye and has a little chance to rescue it right now. Here are different pictures posted by Bedoon and Kuwaiti netizens online:

Picture of a security man pointing his shotgun towards protesters

One of the Bedoon protesters getting arrested (posted by @Mohd_AlSalem)

Different pictures of injuries caused by rubber bullets (posted by @YaqoobAbdualla)

One of the signs held in the protest (posted by @Mohd_AlSalem)

Gas canisters and rubber bullets (posted by @HAlshammri)

Bedoon protester head-injured (posted by @FawazFarhan)

Picture of the weapon used to fire teargas against protesters (posted by @Montheralhabeeb)

Pro-bedoon Kuwaiti activist Hussain Al-Khaldi getting arrested (posted by @faisalalmana)

Rubber bullets used against protesters (posted by @AleradaNews)

This video (posted by 7MGAN) puts together a 15 minute footage of the Bedoon protest:

In response to criticism, the Interior Ministry issued a statement on Tuesday night accusing the Bedoon of the following:

1- Distracting the work of the Central Agency through social media and making false accusations against this governmental body 2- Causing problems in the country in abuse of the crisis that the country is going through 3- Rioting, violence, and calling for an illegal protest 4- Vandalism, blocking traffic, and starting fires in public and private properties 5- Risking the lives of citizens 6- Attacking security men and 7- Vandalizing ambulances and throwing stones on them and on security men.

August 28 2012

Lebanon: Tourism Pays the Ultimate Price

Lebanon lacks oil and mineral resources. It is geographically too small to be independent in terms of agriculture. And the only way the country can survive is by relying on its services sector, mainly tourism, if and when politics permit.

But Lebanon has not been lucky with this regard. It has been plagued with a 30 year civil war which repelled tourists. After that, and whenever the Lebanese tried to attract visitors to the Land of the Cedars, whether Westerners or Arabs, a calamity would take place and all efforts to promote the tourism sector would go in vain.

Just to name some of the few incidents which impacted Lebanese tourism recently: the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafic Hariri in 2005 and the wave of other political murders which followed, the July 2006 war with Israel, the May 2008 internal conflict between different political factions, and the recent events with the divide over the Syrian crisis and the return of kidnappings to the local scene.

With the warning of embassies to their citizens to leave Lebanon, reservations in hotels dropped by 60 per cent the week of August 14th. Cancellations are also noted in terms of flight reservations.

On Twitter, the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs tweeted the Embassy number in Beirut, urging its citizens in Lebanon to contact their Embassy to ensure their swift return back to their home:

لمواطني الدولة المتواجدين حاليا في لبنان التواصل مع سفارة الدولة في بيروت على الرقم009611857000 أو بادارة العمليات على الرقم00971600599991
@MOFAUAE For the citizens currently in Lebanon, please contact the Embassy in Beirut on the following number () or the operations on …

In return, Lebanese netizens are mourning the tourism season.

Najib from Blog Baladi is sad:

All in all, I think this is the worst summer we’ve had in Lebanon for the past 10 years, even worse than the 2006 summer. That’s really sad specially with all the potential we have in this country.

On Twitter, Rawad Khoueiry summarizes the situation:

@rawadkhoueirySummer Tourism in lebanon: No Electricity, Mokdad Military Wing, Airport Road Cut, North Frontier Shooting

Wael Abou Diab explains the causes [ar]:

#بيروت تعاني …فنادق فارغة و سياحة شبه معدومة و الأسباب أمنية إقليمية عشائرية
@Waelad: Beirut is suffering. Empty hotels, quasi non-existing tourism. The reasons are sectarian, regional and related to the clans.

But as usual Lebanese sense of humour is always present against all odds.

Ralph Nader believes that the huge number of Syrians taking refuge in Lebanon will make it up for the loss of Gulf nationals.

@Aamchit: Tourism is booming in Lebanon. People are coming from Damascus, Tartous, Homs, Aleppo, Deir El Zor and many other cities. #irony

Tourists have become such a rare species in Lebanon that Bechara is surprised.

@BouCha2ra: Guess what?! I saw a tourist yesterday! m/ O.o #Lebanon

Zeina Mhanna is also sarcastic:

@MissZenaH: Today I had a Turkish tourist client.. I gave her directions to protect herself from aliens abduction in #Lebanon

Wajih has been visiting Istanbul and that is how he is promoting tourism for his country:

@neruda906: Someone tell the Minister of Tourism I'm doing a great job here, I'm convincing everybody I meet not to visit Beirut :) #Lebanon

Gulf Netizens React

With Al Mekdad Clan threatening to kidnap them, nationals from the Gulf were disappointed.

Maktoum Bin Butti, from the UAE, notes:

@Makoumbinbutti: GCC countries supported Lebanon financially and boosted their tourism & in return they get kidnapped #awkward#GCC

AbdulRahman Al Haji calls his fellow citizen to boycott Lebanon:

من اليوم فصاعداً يا سواح الخليج قاطعوا لبنان بروحهم دولة دايخة قاطعوهم قاطعوهم
@alhajji1963: From now, Gulf tourists, boycott Lebanon, a confusing state. Boycott them. Boycott them

Borzou Daraghi, who is MENA correspondent for the Financial Times, believes Jordan and Turkey will benefit mostly from what is happening in Lebanon

@Borzou: With #Syria, #Egypt & now #Lebanon off the rich Gulf Arab tourist circuit I bet #Turkey & #Jordan will be raking in the cash

August 18 2012

Kuwait: The People Know Better

Kuwaiti netizens are expressing their disdain for an old-age tradition which gives the head of the tribe, or the Shaikh [Sheikh] absolute power. In a break with this tradition, they are tweeting under the hash tag #الشعب_أبخص‬‏ [ar], which translates to “The People Know Better.”

Kuwaiti television presenter Ali Al Sanad writes:

عبارة “الشيوخ أبخص” تعبر عن ثقافة مريضة تعبر عن التبعية والرعوية التي لاتعترف بالمواطنة الكاملة، لذلك جاء الوقت لكي نستبدلها بـ ‎‫#الشعب_أبخص‬‏

@al_snd: The saying “The Shaikhs know best” reflects a sick culture, which is made of followers and those with the herd mentality. It doesn't accept full citizenship. This is why the time has come to replace it with “The people know better.”

Tariq Al Mutari responds:

نعم الشيوخ أبخص في بيتوهم وحلالهم وهذا حقهم وفيه منطق ، لكن الشيوخ أبخص بحلال الشعب وأمواله وحياته ومستقبله بأي عقل ومنطق؟! #الشعب_أبخص
@al_tariq2009: Yes. The Shaikhs know better in their own homes and their own money and this is their right and logical. But what reason or logic is applicable when Shaikhs know better how to run the money, life and future of the people?!

And Omar Alessa adds:

عطيناكم خمسين سنة لقيادة الدولة وانتم من فشل لآخر ومن سيء لأسوأ.. وفوق هذا نقضتوا المواثيق.. عطونا فرصة نقود الدولة لأن #الشعب_أبخص

@omar_alessa

: We gave you 50 years to lead the nation and you have been sporting one failure after the other, and becoming from bad to worse. After all this, you also break promises. Give us a chance to lead the nation because the people know better

Meanwhile, Talal Al Harbi explains:

إلى غير رجعة ياحقبة العصور المُظلمة .. ! فلقد تحررت العقول وتصدر الأمة شباب يريدون أن يسطروا التاريخ بطريقتهم وأسلوبهم وفكرهم ف ‎‫#الشعب_أبخص‬‏

@Talal_M_1984: The dark ages are gone and will not return… The minds are now liberated and youth who want to write a new history want to lead this nation in their own way and ideas because the people know better

But Barjas Albarjas shares a different viewpoint. He says:

يعتقد الكثير أن ‎‫#الشعب_أبخص‬‏ هم حل نموذجي،محد عامل حسابه أن الشعب هو أنا وأنت وموظفو الخطوط والجوازات والاحوال والصحة وكل من تعّبنا وبهذلنا
@Barjasbh: A lot believe that the people know better is a model solution but no one is taking into consideration that the people are me and you and the airline employees and those who work in immigration, the meteorological office and health department - basically all those who have troubled and humiliated us

Khalid Al Rajhi concludes:

#الشعب_أبخص‬‏ لأنه فعلاً ابخص !!!

@khalid_alrajhi
: The people know better because they really know better

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