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March 14 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Berlin Rally #FREEBRADLEYMANNING 15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor #freebrad #wikileaks | Freiheit für Bradley Manning





GUILTY OF TELLING THE TRUTH. FREE BRADLEY MANNING!


Schuldig die Wahrheit ans Licht gebracht zu haben.



15. März 17 Uhr Kundgebung vor dem Brandenburger Tor, Pariser Platz Rückseite der Amerikanischen Botschaft. Rally for Bradley Manning in Berlin.





Reposted bywikileakslydschi

March 02 2012

Play fullscreen
Senate bill aims to prevent indefinite detention of US citizens

FSRN: Senate responds to controversial National Defense Authorization Act which President Obama signed into law late last year

Time: 05:32 More in News & Politics
Reposted bycheg00 cheg00

February 28 2012

02mydafsoup-01

Suing the United States Government to stop the implementation of the NDAA



Stop the NDAA!

Support Chris Hedges, Noam Chomsky, Daniel Ellsberg, and Birgitta Jonsdottir in suing the United States Government to stop the implementation of the NDAA - It's set to take effect on March 1, 2012 and we want to sign up as many grassroots supporters as possible before then.

February 05 2012

Bradley Manning Nobel Peace Prize Nomination 2012

laugardagur, febrúar 04, 2012

February 1st  2012 the entire parliamentary group of The Movement of the Icelandic Parliament nominated Private Bradley Manning for the Nobel Peace Prize. Following is the reasoning we sent to the committee explaining why we felt compelled to nominate Private Bradley Manning for this important recognition of an individual effort to have an impact for peace in our world. Our letter to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee: We have the great honor of nominating Private First Class Bradley Manning for the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize. Manning is a soldier in the United States army who stands accused of releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. The leaked documents pointed to a long history of corruption, war crimes, and imperialism by the United States government in international dealings. These revelations have fueled democratic uprising around the world, including a democratic revolution in Tunisia. [...]

via  Evernote
Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

February 01 2012

02mydafsoup-01

January 17 2012

Chris Hedges Sues Obama Admin Over Indefinite Detention of US Citizens Approved in NDAA

www.democracynow.org - Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges has filed suit against President Obama and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta to challenge the legality of the National Defense Authorization Act, which includes controversial provisions authorizing the military to jail anyone it considers a terrorism suspect anywhere in the world, without charge or trial. Sections of the bill are written so broadly that critics say they could encompass journalists who report on terror-related issues, such as Hedges, for supporting enemy forces. "It is clearly unconstitutional," Hedges says of the bill. "It is a huge and egregious assault against our democracy. It overturns over 200 years of law, which has kept the military out of domestic policing." We speak with Hedges, now a senior fellow at the Nation Institute, and former New York Times foreign correspondent who was part of a team of reporters that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper's coverage of global terrorism. We are also joined by Hedges' attorney Carl Mayer, who filed the litigation on his behalf in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York. Towatch the complete daily, independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, and for additional coverage of the NDAA and civil liberties issues, visit the Democracy Now! news archives at www.democracynow.org FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: www.facebook.com Twitter: @democracynow Subscribe on YouTube: www.youtube <b>...</b>
Views: 32
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Time: 12:11 More in News & Politics
Reposted fromVideosDemocracy VideosDemocracy

January 09 2012

7 Hebdo | L’éliminateur - Le Républicain Lorrain

Le film de Rithy Panh Duch, le maître des forges de l’enfer est diffusé demain sur France 3 avant sa sortie en salles le 18 janvier.

 

-------------------------------------

 // quotation by oAnth

 [...]

 Pourquoi et comment, un paisible enseignant en mathématiques s’est progressivement transformé en un rouage parfaitement huilé de l’une des plus monstrueuses machines de mort du XX e siècle ? Face à la caméra, c’est un homme-tronc, assis derrière une modeste table de travail, qui s’explique pendant plus d’une heure et quarante minutes. Relativement impassible, Duch raconte comment il fut l’artisan méticuleux de l’élimination physique des ennemis de l’Angkar, littéralement « l’organisation », qui était alors à la tête de son pays. Parce qu’il croyait à ce Kampuchéa démocratique né sur les cendres du royaume de Sihanouk. Parce que c’était « l’intérêt du parti » et parce que c’était « son propre intérêt : afin de rester vivant ». Pour toutes ces raisons, explique-t-il, « ce travail, je devais le faire ». Et parce qu’il n’était pas homme à négliger sa tâche, il s’en est remarquablement acquitté.

 Un raisonnement parfaitement glacial servi par des exécutants pour qui les prisonniers étaient si certainement voués au trépas qu’ils finissaient par les considérer « comme de simples bûches ». C’est-à-dire des objets, des non-sujets. Rien de plus. Duch s’étonne d’ailleurs : « Méchant ? Cruel ? Je ne sais pas quel sens donner à ces mots ».

 [...]

 Original URL -- http://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/actualite/2012/01/08/l-eliminateur

 

See it on Scoop.it, via manually by oAnth - from my scoop.it contacts

January 01 2012

3793 7413

thedailywhat:

This Is Important, You Should Know About It of the Day: President Obama today quietly signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, which contains controversial provisions requiring military custody for any non-citizen suspected of terrorism and affirming the president’s authority to indefinitely detain any supporter of al-Qaeda “or associated forces, irrespective of citizenship.

In a signing statement, the President said he had “serious reservations” about the bill, and criticised lawmakers for interfering with the work of counterterrorism professionals.

“Moving forward, my administration will interpret and implement the provisions described below in a manner that best preserves the flexibility on which our safety depends and upholds the values on which this country was founded,” the statement said.

The Obama administration was successful in striking down a provision that would have removed the ability of the executive branch to override the military custody requirement. Additionally, US citizens and legal immigrants may not be subjected to military custody under the revised bill.

However, an amendment to explicitly exclude American citizens and lawful residents from indefinite detention was rejected by Congress.

“My administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens,” Obama said. “Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a nation.”

The President’s personal stance aside, in addition to creating myriad difficulties for counterterrorism agents working with suspected terrorists to gain information, the NDAA provisions leave the door wide open for future presidents to indefinitely detain American citizens without trial.

[ap / think / aclu.]

Reposted fromLuckyLobos LuckyLobos viasofias sofias

December 22 2011

Play fullscreen
New Military Detention Powers Threaten Basic Rights

David Swanson: President Obama in full support of provisions that target US citizens and others with extraordinary powers of detention without trial

Time: 11:06 More in News & Politics
Reposted bysofiasn0gbrightbytemondkroeteozelbotkrekk

December 19 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Play fullscreen
Glenn Greenwald Reports on Bradley Manning's Military Pre-Trial Hearing
Uploaded by democracynow on Dec 19, 2011
DemocracyNow.org - Democracy Now! interviews constitutional lawyer and Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald about the military pre-trial hearing now underway for alleged U.S. Army whistleblower Bradley Manning, who has been accused for releasing classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks. Greenwald comments on the possible strategy being put forth by Manning's defense. "All the Manning [tribunal] hearings have been shrouded in secrecy," Greenwald says, noting there may be more transparency in Guantánamo detainee hearings than there has been for the Manning tribunal. "Presumably, his lawyer believes that one of the best ways they have to keep him out of prison for the next six decades is to argue that he had diminished capacity by virtue of emotional distress over the gender struggles that he had, over his sexual orientation being in a military that had a policy of banning those who were openly gay, and so part of this emotional distress that they're raising is designed to say that he should be excused of his actions because they were not the byproduct of full choice," says Greenwald, who is openly gay, and has been writing extensively about this aspect of Manning's case. "He is, and I don't blame him at all, trying to do whatever he can to avoid having his life destroyed: Either being killed by the state or locked up in a cage for the rest of his life."

To watch the complete daily, independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, and for more information about Bradley Manning and WikiLeaks, visit http://www.democracynow.org/tags/wikileaks
Reposted bywikileakssofiasbrightbyteignominy

December 17 2011

02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01

December 16 2011

Obama and the final destruction of the constitution

The 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, if signed into law, will signal the death knell of our constitutional republic and the formal inception of a legalized police state in the United States. Passed by the House on May 26, 2011 (HR 1540), the Senate version (S. 1867) was passed on Dec. 1, 2011. Now only one man — Barack Obama, a scholar of constitutional law — will make the decision as to whether the Bill of Rights he went to Harvard to study will be superceded by a law that abrogates it.
First, let’s be clear what is at stake. Most critical are Sections 1031 and 1032 of the Act, which authorize detaining U.S. citizens indefinitely without charge or trial if deemed necessary by the president. The bill would allow federal officials to take these steps based on suspicions only, without having to demonstrate to any judicial official that there is solid evidence to justify their actions. No reasonable proof will any longer be required for the government to suspend an American citizen’s constitutional rights. Detentions can follow mere membership, past or present, in “suspect organizations.” Government agents would have unchecked authority to arrest, interrogate, and indefinitely detain law-abiding citizens if accused of potentially posing a threat to “national security.” Further, military personnel anywhere in the world would be authorized to seize U.S. citizens without due process. As Senator Lindsay Graham put it, under this Act the U.S. homeland is considered a “battlefield.”
What is at stake is more than the Constitution itself, as central as that document has been to the American experiment in democracy. What is a stake is nothing short of the basic fundamentals of western jurisprudence. Central to civilized law is the notion that a person cannot be held without a charge and cannot be detained indefinitely without a trial. These principles date back to Greco-Roman times, were developed by English common law beginning in 1215 with the Magna Carta, and were universalized by the Enlightenment in the century before the American Constitution and Bill of Rights were fought for and adopted as the supreme law of the land.
For more than two centuries of constitutional development since then, the United States has been heralded as the light to the world precisely because of the liberties it enshrined in its Declaration of Independence and Constitution as inalienable. It now seems as if the events of 9/11 have been determined to be of such a threatening magnitude that our national leaders feel justified to abrogate in their entirety the very inalienable principles upon which our Republic was founded.
At the heart of this Act is the most fundamental question we must ask ourselves as a free people: is 9/11 worth the Republic? The question screaming at us through this bill is whether the war on terror is a better model around which to shape our destiny than our constitutional liberties. It compels the question of whether we remain an ongoing experiment in democracy, pioneering new frontiers in the name of liberty and justice for all, or have we become a national security state, having financially corrupted and militarized our democracy to such an extent that we define ourselves, as Sparta did, only through the exigencies of war?
Within a week of 9/11, the Use of Military Force Act was approved which authorized the full application of U.S. military power against “terrorism.” A month later, on Oct. 26, 2001, Congress overwhelmingly passed the Patriot Act that began the legislative assault on the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment right to freedom of association was gutted as federal officials were authorized to prosecute citizens for alleged association with “undesirable groups.” The Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search and seizure was compromised by permitting indefinite detentions of those suspected of “terrorism.” The Fourteenth Amendment right to privacy was obliterated as unchecked surveillance was authorized to access personal records, financial dealings, and medical records of any citizen at any time without any judicial oversight or permission. Evidence obtained extra-judicially could be withheld from defense attorneys.
The Patriot Act also criminalized “domestic terrorism.” It stated that civil conduct can be considered “domestic terrorism” if such actions aim to “influence by intimidation or coercion” or “intimidate or coerce a civilian population.” Put in plain language, this means that actions such as Occupy Wall Street can be designated as “domestic terrorism” by Federal authorities without judicial oversight and dealt with outside the due process of constitutional protections.
Two weeks after passage of the Patriot Act, on Nov. 13, President Bush issued Military Order No. 1 authorizing the executive branch and the military to capture, kidnap, or otherwise arrest non-citizens anywhere in the world if suspected of engaging in terrorist activities. Proof was not required. It stipulated that trials, if held, would be military tribunals, not civil courts, and that evidence obtained by torture was permissible. No right of appeal was afforded to those convicted. Numerous executive orders, findings, and National and Homeland Security Presidential Directives followed, further consolidating the militarization of due process under the law and enabling the executive branch to act without legal constraint after it has defined a person or group as potentially engaging in “terrorist” activity.
A year later, on Nov. 25, 2002, the Homeland Security Act was passed that for the first time integrated all U.S. intelligence agencies, both domestic and foreign, into a single interactive network under the president. The Act gave these intelligence agencies complete freedom to collect any and all data on anyone anywhere in the United States and, working with allies abroad, to access complete information on anyone anywhere in the world, working closely with local police, intelligence agencies, and the corporate sector. This dissolved the distinctions between domestic and foreign spying and made more ambiguous the distinction between domestic and foreign “terrorism.”
The next major step took place on Oct. 17, 2006, when Congress passed the Military Commissions Act that effectively abrogated habeas corpus for domestic and foreign enemies alike, stating, “Any person is punishable who aides, abets, counsels, commands, or procures” material support for alleged terrorist groups. One of the most basic principles of both our democracy and our civilization, that a person cannot be held without being charged, was surrendered, and done so by substantial majorities in both houses. On the same day, the 2007 NDAA was passed, which amended the 1807 Insurrection Act and 1878 Posse Comitatus Act, prohibiting U.S. military personnel from acting upon U.S. citizens within U.S. borders. Not only was anything allowable in the pursuit of “terrorists,” but the military was authorized to conduct operations inside the homeland in their pursuit.
Now comes the 2012 NDAA, which completes the process and thus serves as the coup de grace for a democratically voted metamorphosis from republic to national security state. It puts the final nail in the coffin of the Constitution by designating the entire United States as essentially the same “battlefield” in the war on terror as Iraq or Afghanistan, and authorizes the executive branch and the military to take whatever actions they consider legitimate against any human being anywhere on planet earth, civilian or enemy combatant, and to do so without any judicial oversight or constitutional constraint. If this Act is passed, the Bill of Rights will no longer protect American citizens from their government. The Constitution will no longer be the ultimate law of the land.
The House and Senate versions of the Act must now be reconciled and the Act sent to the president to either sign or veto. With his decision, he will determine the fate of those very liberties which, up to this point, have been integral to and indeed have defined America.

20111215-181926.jpg

Reposted fromSigalontech Sigalontech

November 13 2011

Egypt: Plight of Bloggers Continues at Military Courts

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

A military court today decided to jail blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah for another 15 days, 15 days after first detaining him, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges. Blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad's trial was also once again postponed until November 27.

Abd El Fattah was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecution, in protest against its legitimacy. His arrest, and the international outcry it has caused, is shedding light on the plight of more than 12,000 civilians, including Sanad, who have been put on military trials in Egypt since the the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) took power. Abd El Fattah is accused of inciting violence against the military, stealing a weapon and destroying military equipment during the October 9 Maspero massacre, in which 25 Egyptians, mostly Copts, were killed in clashes between the military poilce and protesters demanding answers for the burning of churches in Sohag and Aswan.

Supporters wrote freedom for alaa abd el fattah on the ground outside the military prosecution building in cairo. photo by nazly hussein, posted on twitter

Supporters wrote Freedom for Alaa Abd El Fattah on the ground outside the Military Prosecution building in Cairo. Photo by Nazly Hussein, posted on Twitter

Abd El Fattah's trial coincided with Sanad's - Egypt's first blogger to be arrested and charged by a military court after the revolution which ousted Hosni Mubarak as president. Sanad was sentenced to three years in prison, for writing a post on his blog, which the military said was insulting.

The charges against Sanad are insulting the armed forces, publishing false information on his blog and disturbing public security. Last month, the Supreme Military Court of Appeals annulled the conviction but continued to hold Sanad, who had started a hunger strike, transferring him to a mental health facility.

Back in prison, Sanad continued with his hunger strike and his defiance to accept being subjected to the trial of a military court, a stance similar to Abd El Fattah's.

Today's rulings are seen by many as yet another blow for free speech and human rights in post-revolutionary Egypt.

The Big Pharaoh sums up the day:

@TheBigPharoah: Alaa refused to recognize the military court legitimacy, #MaikelNabil told his lawyers not to speak. Respect. #FreeAlaa

Rasha Abdulla adds:

@RashaAbdulla: Alaa Abdel fattah gets another 15 days in prison pending investigation. MaikelNabil postponed to Nov 27. Min of defence detainees acquitted

At first, news emerged that the Military Prosecutor dropped one of the charges from Abd El Fattah's accusations - that of stealing a weapon.

Alfred Raouf tweets:

@Kemety: will be detained for another 15 days, they dropped accusation of stealing weapons. He still refused recognizing the court.

And Azza Shaaban explains [ar]:

رغم اسقاط تهمة سرقة السلاح عن علاء عبدالفتاح لكن تهم التحريض واتلاف والتجمهر واستخدام القوة لسه لم تسقط
@Azza_Shaaban: Even though the charge of stealing a weapon has been dropped from Alaa Abd El Fattah, the charges of inciting violence, gathering, destruction of property and the use of force still remain

It then turns out that the judge “forgot” to turn the charge sheet to the next page.

Sultan Al Qassemi reports:

@SultanAlQassemi: Egypt Military Prosecutor: 's charge of “stealing army weapons” remains. Judge “forgot” to turn the charge sheet.

Farah Saafan notes:

@FarahSaafan: A Military Council that issues official statements on FB with judges that forget 2 turn pages during trials & can't protect minorities= SCAF

And Moutaz Dawood adds [ar]:

وبتجديد حبس علاء عبالفتاح .. يثبت المجلس العسكرى أنه لايجيد التفاوض ولا المرواغه .. ادواته الوحيده القضاء العسكرى والشرطه العسكريه
@Moutaz_D: By renewing Alaa Abd El Fattah's detention, SCAF proves that it doesn't master the art of negotition and that its only tools are military trials and military police

Meanwhile, Nazly Hussein reports about a defiant Abd El Fattah emerging out of court [ar]:

علاء خرج دلوقتي و هتف يسقط يسقط حكم العسكر من جوة البوكس

@nazlyhussein: Alaa just left and chanted: “Down Down with Military Rule” from inside the police jeep

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Egypt: Why Free Blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah?

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

A graffiti of alaa abd el fattah which reads: don't forget me. photo by bassem sabry

A graffiti of Alaa Abd El Fattah which reads: Don't forget me. Photo by Bassem Sabry

A military court judge will decide today whether Alaa Abd El Fattah will be released or will spend another 15 days behind bars, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges. He is accused of inciting violence against the military, stealing arms and damaging military property.

Abd El Fattah was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecution, in protest against its legitimacy. His arrest, and the international outcry it has caused, is shedding light on the plight of more than 12,000 civilians, who have been put on military trials in Egypt since the the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) took over.

On Twitter, supporters have been rallying for his freedom under the hashtag #WhyFreeAlaa . Here is a selection of some of the tweets under this hashtag.

Mostafa Rafat tweets:

@llvllostafa: #WhyFreeAlaa cuz he is in prison instead of me & u

Ahmad moein shares a similar sentiment:

@ahmadmoein: #WhyFreeAlaa because you're next!

S K adds:

@nolesfan2011: #whyfreealaa because he's a hero, he's innocent and he's my friend one of the most inspiring people I know

Hussein Adel Fahmy admits [ar]:

عشان أقوله أسف أنى كنت واخد فكرة غلط عنك تماما قبل الثورة..
@7usfahmy: So that I can apologise to him because I had a completely wrong impression about him before the revolution

And his sister Mona Seif, who has been championing against the military trial of civilians, since the beginning of the revolution, tweets:

@Monasosh: #WhyFreeAlaa coz I really miss u and I am tired of pretending it's easy

Columnist Mona Eltahawy sums it up:

@monaeltahawy: #WhyFreeAlaa Because he makes #Egypt better.

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Egypt: Free Speech on Military Trial in Post-Revolution Egypt

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Bloggers and freedom of speech and human rights defenders are holding their breath as Egypt's military courts decide the fate of two bloggers today. Maikel Nabil Sanad's trial continues today. Also, a military court judge will decide whether Alaa Abd El Fattah will be released or will spend another 15 days behind bars, pending investigations on what defenders say are trumped up charges.

Louisa Loveluck reminds us:

@leloveluck: Important day for freedom of speech in : court ruling and Abdelfattah investigation both taking place.

Sarrah Abdelrahman explains:

@sarrahsworld: today is critical. Maikel Nabil court ruling. Alaa Abdelfattah investigation

Hossam Eid calls on supporters to turn up at the hearing. He tweets:

@EidH: If you could show up at S28 in support with Alaa and all the military trailed Egyptians that would be great

And Rasha Abdulla is on her way to the trial, accompanied by Abd El Fattah's nine-month pregnant wife Manal Hassan, to C28, the headquarters of the military prosecutors:

@RashaAbdulla: Will now pick up to S28 where Alaa's case will be tried. join us at Nasr city near microbus stop

Both Sanad and Abd El Fattah refuse to acknowledge the military court trying them. Sanad was arrested days after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as the president of Egypt, and was sentenced in April to three years in prison for posts he published on his blog.

The charges against Sanad are insulting the armed forces, publishing false information on his blog and disturbing public security. Last month, the Supreme Military Court of Appeals annulled the conviction but continued to hold Sanad, who had started a hunger strike, transferring him to a mental health facility.

Back in prison, Sanad continued with his hunger strike and his defiance to accept being subjected to the trial of a military court, a stance similar to Abd El Fattah, who was detained on October 30, after refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecutor, in protest against its legitimacy. Abd El Fattah is accused of inciting violence against the military, overtaking armed forces weapons and damaging military equipment.

Since January 28, more than 12,000 civilians have been put on military trials in Egypt.

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

November 11 2011

ROG fordert Ende der Verfolgung von Bloggern in Ägypten

Reporter ohne Grenzen hat heute eine Petition gestartet, die unsere Unterstützung benötigt.

In Ägypten werden Blogger und Dissidenten weiterhin verfolgt und inhaftiert, weil sie berichten und ihre Meinung äußern.Die Petition von ROG fordert die Einstellung der Verfolgung von Internetdissidenten sowie die umgehende und bedingungslose Freilassung der ägyptischen Blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad und Alaa Abdel Fattah.

Spread The Word!

November 03 2011

02mydafsoup-01
[...]

From their stories I discover the truth of the great achievements of the restoration of security. Two of my colleagues are seeing jail for the first time, simple youth without a grain of violence and their accusation is? Forming a gang. Indeed, Abu Malik alone is an armed gang unto himself. Now I understand what the Interior Ministry means when it reports that it has caught armed gangs. I congratulate us for the restoration of security then.

[...]
Felix Arabia: Translation of article by detained Egyptian blogger Alaa Abdel Fattah | sultanalqassemi.blogspot.com 2011-10-02

November 02 2011

Egypt: SCAF - The Last Pillar of the House?!

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Over the past few days we witnessed the detention of the prominent Egyptian blogger, Alaa Abd El Fattah; one more civilian victim of the Military Trials is believed to be tortured to death in his jail; the murderers of Khaled Said (the case that fueled the Egyptian revolution) were recently punished with only seven years in jail; and until now, the Supreme Council of Armed Forces refuse to hold responsibility for the massacre the took place in Maspero area, earlier this month. All these incidents made Egyptian bloggers wonder whether are we back to square one? Or as Alaa wrote in the message he sent from his detention, and was translated by Sultan AlQassemi:

I did not expect that the very same experience would be repeated after five years, after a revolution in which we have ousted the tyrant, I go back to jail?

It is clear to many, including Amira Nowaira, that the Supreme Council for Armed Forces (SCAF) is not doing well in managing the transitional period in Egypt.

More than 3 weeks after the deadly clashes that left 27 dead (so far) and hundreds injured on Sunday 9 October in front of the Egyptian State TV building, Maspero, there are still more questions than answers. The only thing that is clear is that the brutal attack against peaceful, mostly Coptic, protesters, marks a dangerous turning point in the ruling military council’s (dis)management of Egypt’s transition and sends a number of worrying messages.

Not only are they said to be mismanaging the transitional period, but they are being accused of standing behind the massacre, as many stated here. And according to Bikya Masr writer, Hayden Pirkle, the Coptic businessman Naguib Sawiris too holds the Egyptian military responsible for Maspero massacre.

Prominent Coptic businessman turned politician, Naguib Sawiris, accused the Egyptian military of being complicit in the massacre at Maspero on October 9. Sawiris rejected that the violence at Maspero was incited by “infiltrators” and stated that it is the responsibility of the military to safeguard security, in an interview on Al Arabiya TV’s “Point of Order”

But how did we reach the point where the masses are to a big extent neutral to incidents like these ones and the majority even side with the army? A few months ago clashes took place in Al-Abbasseya district, and activists then wrote how the SCAF incited against their march for days on the state-run channels, and issued a statement the night prior to the clashes also carrying the same tone. And recently the same tactics were used in the Maspero massacre, and according to Amira Nowaira, the state TV was more blunt in incitement against the Copts:

This is the first time that State TV has been engaged in an open and shameless incitement against Copts. It did the unthinkable when it alleged that the army was being attacked by Copts and called on “honourable citizens” to come out to help defend the army, not realizing perhaps that it is the army that is supposed to defend citizens and not the other way round. This was tantamount to an invitation to extremists, bigots and racists to assault Copts on the streets.

And Elazul summarized the effect of the state media in the following paragraph.

Evidence only shows that not only were we opposed by Mubarak's group (including the SCAF), but also by a (large) segment of the population that until this day, curses the day we ever revolted, and considers us criminals & traitors.

Meanwhile, The Big Pharaoh added that the SCAF is also trying to deliver a certain message, not only the the Egyptians, but also to the US administration.

I wanted to know whether the Obama administration had gotten the message SCAF wanted to deliver ever since they allowed the Israeli embassy to be stormed. And this message can be summarized as follows: it’s either us or chaos in Egypt, it’s either us or sectarian strife.

Judging from the US’ mild statement after the massacre, I believe SCAF’s message was delivered. And it was not just delivered to the international community, but also to the general public as well. Fear and insecurity dominates the country today, and very few would like to collide with the military junta whom they consider to be the last remaining pillar holding the country together.

He then added that the delivery of such a message is like the green light for them that start a crackdown on activists and media.

This takes us to what I believe will happen to activists in Egypt. After ensuring that there won’t be much of a powerful objection from the inside front nor the international community, I believe SCAF will crackdown on activists and media unprecedentedly.

And this is exactly what many say is going on now. However, Abu Tawil mocked how the SCAF despite all this, is celebrating the raising of world’s highest flag in Egypt.

Naturally, in light of these troubled yet busy times and nearly eight months worth of their (mis)management, SCAF needed to take a break from trying activists in front of military trials, blaming invisible foreign hands for all of Egypt’s domestic problems, and decrying all protests and strikes for threatening national unity. Moreover thanks to the flight of foreign investment, dwindling foreign currency reserves, and an eighty percent decrease in the number of tourists, the Egyptian economy can afford to waste funds on useless public projects. As such, SCAF is proud to announce the raising of the world’s highest flag. Measuring 12 by 15 meters and flying at a height of 176 meters (14 meters higher than that of Azerbaijan), the flag has hoisted next to the dirt field where I play ultimate frisbee twice a week while patriotic poetry was recited and the national anthem was sung.

Meanwhile, the Egyptian parties are setting themselves for the parliamentary elections that will be held by the end of this month. And the importance of the coming parliament is that it will appoint the committee that will be writing the Egyptian constitution, however the deputy Prime Minister for Political Affairs, Ali Al-Selmy, invited political parties in order to seek their agreement on constitutional principles that are seen to give the military extraordinary power.

On Twitter, the changes got much heat.

@abuhatem: The supra-constitutional principles document drafted by the government in Egypt gives military extraordinary power.

@zalali: New draft provides inordinate amount of power to #SCAF 2 intervene in the drafting of new #constitution. Some attendees left meeting. #Egypt

However Khaled is worried that people in the street might not be really critical to the draft as the activists on Twitter are.

@Khaled_A_: أكيد إللى هتسمعه من حد فى الشارع على الوثيقة الفوق دستورية: و ماله ما يكون فوق الدستور ده جيشنا ده هو إللى حمى الثورة ده مضربش عليكم نار

@Khaled_A_: I am sure this is going to be the comment of the people in the street about the supra-constitutional draft: What's wrong with the army being above the constitution? It's our army, and they protected the revolution and didn't shoot anybody then.

And finally, Mohamed Kamel wonders, if there is still a possibility for people to revolt again.

@MohHKamel: Would it be difficult to get people to revolt again after the last 9 months? No security, sectarian tensions, shaky economy?

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

November 01 2011

Egypt: Blogger Maikel Nabil Military Trial Postponed

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

A stenciled image of sanad calling for his freedom. photo by hossam elhamalawy

A stenciled image of Sanad calling for his freedom. Photo by Hossam Elhamalawy

Egyptian blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad, who has so far spent 216 days in prison and 71 days on hunger strike, today refused to stand trial in a military court. Sanad was arrested days after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as the president of Egypt, and sentenced in April to three years in prison for posts he published on his blog.

The charges against him are insulting the armed forces and publishing false information on his blog and disturbing public security. Last month, the Supreme Military Court of Appeals annulled the conviction but continued to hold Sanad, who had started a hunger strike, transferring him to a mental health facility.

Back in prison, Sanad today continues with his hunger strike and his defiance to accept being subjected to the trial of a military court, a stance similar to that of blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah, who was detained for 15 days by a military court on Sunday (October 30) for refusing to be interrogated by the Military Prosecutor, in protest against its legitimacy.

Sanad's trial was today postponed to November 13, creating an uproar on social networking sites. A group of supporters who waited outside court chanted against military trials.

On Twitter, journalist Adam Makary announces:

@adamakary: #BREAKING: #MaikelNabil trial postponed to November 13. Four witnesses called to the stand #egypt

The Big Pharaoh explains:


@TheBigPharaoh
: Lawyers advised #mikaelnabil to apologise for his anti-SCAF blog post. He refused and also refused to accept military court legitimacy.

And Mona Seif, who has been campaigning against the military trial of civilians since January and who is Abd El Fattah's sister, notes [ar]:

مايكل نبيل في جلسة النهاردة،أصر على موقفه و طلب من محاميه الا يترافعوا،و منع المحامي المنتدب من المحكمة من التحدث باسمه. منتظرين حكم المحكمة

@Monasosh: Maikel Nabil, in today's trial, insisted on his stance and asked his lawyer not to take the stand. He also prohibited the court appointed lawyer to speak on his behalf. We are awaiting the court's decision.

The Free Maikel Twitter account released the following statement, reportedly written by Sanad and smuggled out of prison, last night:

@freeMaikel: Urgent statement from #MaikelNabil: I’m Still Boycotting the Military Judicature and I Bear the Consequences

A full statement is available on the Free Maikel Nabil Sanad Facebook page here. In the statement, he writes:

History repeats itself, the same way I objected the compulsory military service last year, this year I boycott litigation before the military officers.

Mr. officers… I say Mr. Officers and not Mr. judge, because the judge before anything has to have the characteristic of independence, whereas military officers are a branch of the executive authority. That’s why, you are an officer, not a judge no matter what names, titles or descriptions you were called.

Sanad continues:

I am a civilian person, I refuse to be tried before a military judicature or any other exceptional judicature, even any judicature lacking independence. I refuse to be tried for my beliefs or my opinions, or that settling of accounts be done with me for the same of fascist Intelligence agencies, which don’t respect rights.

Sanad is one of 12,000 Egyptian civilians subjected to military trials since the ousting of Mubarak after the January 25 revolution.

Supporters the maikel nabil military trial

Supporters the Maikel Nabil military trial. Photo from Twitter by Adam Makary

After hearing about the postponement of the case, Columnist Mona Eltahawy tweets:


@monaeltahawy
: #SCAF is waiting for #MaikelNabil to die. There is no other conclusion. And after 70days hunger strike& case postponed again, he will soon.

Sandra Yacoub adds:

@SandraYacoub: very few ppl thoughout hisotry lasted more than 70 days without food. They are killing #maikelnabil #freemaikel

And Mohannad concludes [ar]:

ابطالنا في في المحاكم العسكرية مايكل نبيل وعلاء عبد الفتاح ‎#FreeMaikel‏ ‎#FreeAlaa
@mand0z: Our heroes are in military courts - Maikel Nabil and Alaa Abd El Fattah

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

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