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September 13 2013

Raquel Rolnik is an USP urbanist, a major academic figure in Brazilian urban studies... called a…

Raquel Rolnik is an USP urbanist, a major academic figure in Brazilian urban studies... called a loopy leftist in the british press

Via la la liste de géographie critique

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Outrage as ’loopy’ UN inspector lectures Britain: She’s from violent, slum-ridden Brazil, yet still attacks us on housing and human rights | Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418194/Outrage-loopy-UN-inspector-lectures-Britain-Shes-violent-slum-ridden-Br

Outrage as ’loopy’ UN inspector lectures Britain: She’s from violent, slum-ridden Brazil, yet still attacks us on housing and human rights

Iain Duncan Smith said Raquel Rolnik undermined impartiality of the UN
Work and Pensions Secretary wants UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon to investigate
Tory MP Stewart Jackson said Miss Rolnick was a ‘loopy Brazilian leftie’
Her country has 54million living without clean water or sanitation
There are an estimated 30million homeless in the city of Sao Paulo and 625,000 live below the poverty line

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Raquel Rolnik: A dabbler in witchcraft who offered an animal sacrifice to Marx | Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418204/Raquel-Rolnik-A-dabbler-witchcraft-offered-animal-sacrifice-Marx.html

Raquel Rolnik: A dabbler in witchcraft who offered an animal sacrifice to Marx

Academic brought up a Marxist and offered an animal sacrifice to Karl Marx
The architect appears to follow Candomble, an African-Brazilian religion that originated during the slave trade

Libby Porter, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the School of Geography and Environmental Science in Monash University, Australia

"Well, these are outrageously disgusting and insulting media reports of a highly respected activist and voice for housing rights for the poor. We should note in particular, the use of ’loony leftie’, ’raised in violent slums’ and ’witchcraft’ as a means to denigrate and undermine Rolnick along class, gender and political lines. Rolnick is quite right to launch a significant attack on Britain’s housing policy, because that policy is frankly appalling, just as she mounts similar cogent arguments and critiques in countless other places and has done so for years"

#racisme #royaume-uni #arrogance

September 03 2013

US spied on presidents of Brazil, Mexico, documents from Snowden reveal - World Socialist Web Site

US spied on presidents of Brazil, Mexico, documents from Snowden reveal - World Socialist Web Site

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/09/03/snow-s03.html

US spied on presidents of Brazil, Mexico, documents from Snowden reveal
By Tom Eley
3 September 2013

The US National Security Agency eavesdropped on the communications of the presidents of Brazil and Mexico, according to documents gathered by whistleblower Edward Snowden and revealed by journalist Glenn Greenwald to the Brazilian television news program Fantastico.

#prism #snowden #états-unis #mxique #brésil #espionnage

August 27 2013

We're not in 1984. We're not in Brave New World. We're in Brazil !

We’re not in 1984. We’re not in Brave New World. We’re in Brazil ! http://www.imsdb.com/scripts/Brazil.html

INTERVIEWER: Deputy minister, what do you believe is behind this recent increase in terrorist bombings ?

HELPMANN: Bad sportsmanship. A ruthless minority of people seems to have forgotten certain good old fashioned virtues. They just can’t stand seeing the other fellow win. If these people would just play the game, instead of standing on the touch line heckling -

INTERVIEWER: In fact, killing people

HELPMANN: In fact, killing people - they’d get a lot more out of life.

INTERVIEWER: Mr. Helpmann, what would you say to those critics who maintain that the Ministry Of Information has become too large and unwieldy... ?

HELPMANN: David... In a free society information is the name of the game. You can’t win the game if you’re a man short.

Reposted bymurdeltadesi

Turmoil in emerging economies a symptom of global crisis - World Socialist Web Site

Turmoil in emerging economies a symptom of global crisis - World Socialist Web Site

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/08/27/econ-a27.html

Turmoil in emerging economies a symptom of global crisis
By Barry Grey
27 August 2013

This summer’s crisis of the so-called “emerging market” economies reached a new stage last week, as India, Brazil, Turkey and Indonesia all announced emergency measures in an attempt to stem a plunge in their currencies and stock and bond markets.

India, whose rupee has fallen 15 percent versus the US dollar since the start of the year, announced restrictions on the amount of money individuals and companies can send abroad. Turkey raised its interest rates in hopes of curtailing capital flight that has driven down the lira by 10 percent. Indonesia announced steps to increase the availability of dollars in its markets, increase taxes on luxury items and reduce oil imports. Its rupiah has dropped 8 percent this year.

#crise_économique #pays_émergents #brics #crise

August 05 2013

Maximum security prisoners in Brazilian jail take up knitting to create designs for high-end…

Maximum security prisoners in Brazilian jail take up knitting to create designs for high-end fashion label | Mail Online
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2384376/Maximum-security-prisoners-Brazilian-jail-knitting-create-designs-high-

Poring over their fine-quality crochet, the prisoners of Brazil’s Arisvaldo de Campos Pires maximum security penitentiary are a model of concentration.

And it’s no wonder, when you consider what’s at stake.

Thanks to a collaboration with Brazilian fashion designer Raquel Guimaraes, the inmates have one day taken off their sentence for every three days of knitting they perform.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/08/04/article-2384376-1B1F5E40000005DC-875_634x361.jpg

#prison #tricot #Brésil

July 03 2013

Egypt, Brazil, Turkey : without politics, protest is at the mercy of the elites | Seumas Milne |…

Egypt, Brazil, Turkey: without politics, protest is at the mercy of the elites | Seumas Milne | Comment is free | The Guardian
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jul/02/politics-protest-elites-brazil-egypt-organisation

Despite their differences, all three movements have striking common features. They combine widely divergent political groups and contradictory demands, along with the depoliticised, and lack a coherent organisational base. That can be an advantage for single-issue campaigns, but can lead to short-lived shallowness if the aims are more ambitious – which has arguably been the fate of the Occupy movement.

...

In the era of neoliberalism, when the ruling elite has hollowed out democracy and ensured that whoever you vote for you get the same, politically inchoate protest movements are bound to flourish. They have crucial strengths: they can change moods, ditch policies and topple governments. But without socially rooted organisation and clear political agendas, they can flare and fizzle, or be vulnerable to hijacking or diversion by more entrenched and powerful forces.

That also goes for revolutions – and is what appears to be happening in Egypt. Many activists regard traditional political parties and movements as redundant in the internet age. But that's an argument for new forms of political and social organisation. Without it, the elites will keep control – however spectacular the protests.

June 28 2013

24/7 Wall St. » Blog Archive Countries Spending the Most on the Military «

24/7 Wall St. » Blog Archive Countries Spending the Most on the Military «
http://247wallst.com/2013/06/27/countries-spending-the-most-on-the-military/print

For the first time since 1998, global military spending is down. This coincides with a major decline in U.S. spending, which fell by more than $40 billion between 2011 and 2012. Even with this decline, however, the United States still had a military budget four times larger than China, the next biggest spender.

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24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 10 countries that spend the most on their military in 2012, based on SIPRI's measure of military spending in more than 130 nations. We also reviewed SIPRI data on military exports and imports, as well as military expenditure as a percentage of GDP. From Globalfirepower.com, we reviewed statistics on military size and strength, based on the most recent available data. We also considered GDP and GDP growth figures from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

10. Brazil
> Military expenditure: $36.8 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 1.5%
> One-year spending change: -0.5%
> Total exports: $14.1 million (24th highest)
> Total imports: $212 million (24th highest)

Brazil spent roughly $36.8 billion on its military in 2012, higher than all but nine other countries. Military spending has fallen in Brazil since 2010, when the government spent $38.1 billion. Despite being among the top 10 in military spending, the country is barely among the top half in terms of the spending as a percentage of GDP, which was just 1.5% in 2012. In addition to the more than 371,000 people in Brazil who were actively serving in 2011, there were more than 1.3 million Brazilians serving in the active reserves, more than all but five other countries.

9. India
> Military expenditure: $48.3 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 2.5%
> One-year spending change: -2.8%
> Total exports: $1.8 million (32nd highest)
> Total imports: $2.0 billion (the highest)

Military spending in India comprised 2.5% of the country's GDP in 2012, higher than most other countries. However, this has declined every year since 2009, when India spent 2.9% of its GDP on military affairs. Between 2011 and 2012, India's military budget declined by 3%. As of 2011, India had more than 1.3 million active military members, more than any other country except for China and the United States. In addition, India had 1.7 million active reserve members, more than any country except for North Korea and South Korea. India has been the biggest arms importer worldwide in recent years, as it has been upgrading its largely Soviet-era weapons.

8. Germany
> Military expenditure: $48.6 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 1.4%
> One-year spending change: 0.9%
> Total exports: $486 million (6th highest)
>Total imports: $126 million (33rd highest)

Germany spent more than $48.6 billion on its military in 2012, or 1.4% of the country's GDP. This was in line with the 1.3% of GDP it spent back in 2011 but still lower than the majority of countries measured. Germany exported $486 million worth of arms in 2012, higher than all but five other countries. In 2012, Germany announced the largest cuts to its military since the end of World War II. The government intends to scale back or close 100 of its 400 bases and cut the number of soldiers by 15,000 to 185,000. Germany expects to implement the cuts through 2017 at the latest.

7. Saudi Arabia
> Military expenditure: $54.2 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 8.9%
> One-year spending change: 11.7%
> Total exports: n/a
> Total imports: $261 million (16th highest)

Saudi Arabia's military budget comprised 8.9% of the country's GDP in 2012, higher than any other country. However, this was down from 11% of GDP in 2009 and 10% of GDP in 2010. Military spending in 2012 has increased by nearly $10 billion since 2008, reaching more than $54.2 billion last year. Between 2011 and 2012 alone, military spending increased by 12%, higher than most other countries in the world. Solmirano pointed out that oil revenue in Saudi Arabia has allowed the country to spend heavily on the military in recent years. As of 2012, Saudi Arabia produced more than 11.1 million barrels of oil a day, more than any other country.

6. Japan
> Military expenditure: $59.2 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 1.0%
> One-year spending change: -0.6%
> Total exports: n/a
> Total imports: $6 million (78th highest)

Although just five nations spent more on their military in 2012 in absolute terms, in relative terms — as a percentage of GDP — more than 100 nations spent more than Japan. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began pushing for a stronger military after winning the office at the end of 2012. Abe's plans to boost military spending may be limited by the country's massive debt concerns. The IMF estimates Japan's gross debt at nearly 238% of GDP in 2012, proportionally more than any other country. Despite these concerns, Japan recently increased military spending for the first time in 11 years. Although Japan's constitution prohibits initiating military action, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe recently has argued that the country should be permitted to join U.N.-sanctioned military actions.

5. United Kingdom
> Military expenditure: $59.8 billion
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 2.5%
> One-year spending change: -0.8%
> Total exports: $351 million (10th highest)
> Total imports: $254 million (17th highest)

Military spending in the United Kingdom fell for the second straight year in 2012. This was likely due, in part, to a slow GDP growth of less than 1% for the second straight year and a decline in government spending as a percentage of GDP for the third straight year. Early this year, the United Kingdom cut 5,000 troops from its armed forces as part of the nation's broad austerity measures. The U.K. spent just 2.5% of GDP on the military in 2012 and exported just over $350 million in weapons. By contrast, 25 years earlier, the nation spent 4.0% of its annual GDP on its military and exported $2.5 billion worth of arms.

Also Read: The Most Dangerous Cities in America

4. France
> Military expenditure: $62.6 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 2.3%
> One-year spending change: -0.3%
> Total exports: $272 million (11th highest)
> Total imports: $87 million (38th highest)

France's military budget of $62.6 billion in 2012 was higher than any other country in the European Union. However, this has declined every year since 2009, when military spending reached more than $69.4 billion. The military cuts are not over. In April, France announced it would freeze military spending, with an expected budget of roughly $235 billion for the next six years. By 2019, France is expected to reduce its armed forces headcount by 34,000, or nearly 10% of its current force. As of 2011, France had more active military members than all other countries in the EU at 362,485.

3. Russia
> Military expenditure: $90.6 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 4.4%
> One-year spending change: 15.7%
> Total exports: $3.8 billion (2nd highest)
> Total imports: $8.2 million (74th highest)

Russia's military budget has grown significantly in the past several years. In 2008, Russia spent just under $68 billion, or 3.7% of GDP. By 2012, the military budget had grown to more than $90.6 billion, or 4.4% of GDP. The largest increase in spending came between 2011 and 2012, when the budget was increased by 16%. Russia has been in the process of upgrading its weapons over the past several years, working to replace aging submarines, assault ships and ballistic missiles. Russia was the second-largest exporter of weapons in 2012, shipping out more than $3.8 billion in arms. Russia has more self-propelled guns and Corvette missiles than any other country.

2. China
> Military expenditure: $157.6 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 2.0%
> One-year spending change: 7.8%
> Total exports: $443 million (8th highest)
> Total imports: $872 million (4th highest)

China increased its annual military expenditure from $107 billion in 2008 to more than $157 billion in 2012. Despite this spending increase, military expenditure as a percentage of GDP has remained relatively stable at around 2%. China has had one of the world's fastest growing economies in recent years, even with GDP growth slowing to 7.8% in 2012. Currently, China is embroiled in a tense dispute with Japan over the resource-rich Diaoyu islands (called the Senkaku islands in Japan). China also historically has had tense relations with Taiwan, which it still considers to be a breakaway province.

1. United States
> Military expenditure: $668.8 billion
> Expenditure as pct. of GDP: 4.4%
> One-year spending change: -6.0%
> Total exports: $6.2 billion (the highest)
> Total imports: $670 million (6th highest)

The United States spends more on the military than any other country by a wide margin. The country's military budget accounts for roughly 40% of all military spending in the world, according to SIPRI. However, military spending has declined since 2010, when it hit more than $720 billion. Much of the drop has been due to reduced presence in Iraq and Afghanistan. The United States is by far the largest arms exporter in the world — in 2012 the United States exported more than $6.2 billion worth of arms, more than $2.4 billion more than the second-largest exporter, Russia. Earlier in June, the White House announced it was arming Syrian opposition against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

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