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December 21 2012

02mydafsoup-01


J.S. Bach, Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, BWV 140
yt-permalink

http://www.amazon.com/Bach-John-Passion-Wachet-Stimme/dp/B0000069CU


1. Coro: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Wake up, the voice calls to us)
2. Recitativo (tenor): Er kommt (He comes)
3. Aria (soprano, bass): Wann kommst du, mein Heil? (When will you come, my salvation?)
4. Chorale (tenor): Zion hört die Wächter singen (Zion hears the watchmen singing)
5. Recitativo: So geh herein zu mir (So come in with me)
6. Aria (soprano, bass): Mein Freund ist mein! (My friend is mine!)
7. Chorale: Gloria sei dir gesungen (May Gloria be sung to you)

(oAnth: recorded probably in the early 1970s)

Elly Ameling Soprano
Aldo Baldin Tenor
Samuel Ramey Bass

London Voices
English Chamber Orchestra
Raymond Leppard Conductor





cf.: the opening chorus in an excellent more recent interpretation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lz0FmmNrTck



From another complete recording with displayed score, here

Boy Soprano: Alan Bergius
Tenor: Kurt Equiluz
Bass: Thomas Hampson
Chorus master: Gerhard Schmidt-Gaden
Tölzer Knabenchor
Conductor: Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Concentus musicus Wien


More information, texts, and translations are available at this site:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV140.htm

A church cantata by German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), with the cantata chorale based on the Lutheran hymn "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" ("Sleepers awake, the voice is calling") by Philipp Nicolai. The text is based on the Parable of the Ten Virgins in Matthew 25:1-13, the reading of which is scheduled for the 27th Sunday after Trinity in the Lutheran lectionary. This cantata was first performed in Leipzig on November 25, 1731. Bach later transcribed the fourth movement chorale for organ (BWV 645) and published it along with the Schübler Chorales.

English text:


I. (Chorus)

Wake ye maids! hard, strikes the hour,
The watchman calls high on the tower,
Awake, awake, Jerusalem.
Midnight strikes, hear, hear it sounding,
Loud cries the watch, with call resounding:
Where are ye, o wise virgins, where?
Good cheer, the Bridegroom come,
Arise and take your lamps!
Alleluja!
Ye maids beware:
The feast prepare,
So go ye forth to meet Him there.

II. Recitative:

He comes.
The Bridegroom comes!
And Zion's daughter shall rejoice,
He hastens to her dwelling claiming
The maiden of his choice.
The Bridegroom comes; as is a roebuck,
Yea, like a lusty mountain roebuck,
Fleet and fair,
His marriage feast he bids you share.
Arise and take your lamps!
In eagerness to greet him;
Come! hasten, sally forth to meet him.

III. Aria (Duet)

[Soul] Come quickly, now come.
[Jesus] Yea quickly I come.
[Soul] We wait thee with lamps all alighted!
The doors open wide,
Come claim me my bride!
[Jesus] The doors open wide,
I claim me my bride.
[Soul] Come quickly!
[Jesus] Forever in rapture united

IV. Chorale

Zion hears the watchmen calling,
The Faithful hark with joy enthralling,
They rise and haste to greet their Lord.
See, He comes, the Lord victorious,
Almighty, noble, true and glorious,
In Heav'n supreme, on earth adored.
Come now, Thou Holy One,
The Lord Jehovah's Son!
Alleluja!
We follow all
The joyful call
To join Him in the Banquet Hall!

V. Recitative

So come thou unto me,
My fair and chosen bride,
Thou whom I long to see
Forever by my side.
Within my heart of hearts
Art thou secure by ties that naught can sever,
Where I may cherish thee forever.
Forget, beloved, ev'ry care,
Away with pain and grief and sadness,
For better or for worse to share
Our lives in love and joy and gladness.

VI. Aria (Duet)

[Soul] Thy love is mine,
[Jesus] And I am thine!
[Both] True lovers ne'er are parted.
[Soul] Now I with thee, and thou with me.
[Jesus] In flow'ry field will wander,
[Both] In rapture united forever to be.

VII. Chorale

Gloria sing all our voices,
With Angels all mankind rejoices,
With harp and strings in sweetest tone.
Twelve bright Pearls adorn Thy Portals,
As Angels round Thy glorious Throne.
No ear has ever heard
The joy we know.
Our praises flow,
Eeo, eeo,
To God in dulci jubilo.


Text of the Parable of the Ten Virgins:


Matthew 25:1-13 (WEB)

'Then the Kingdom of Heaven will be like ten virgins, who took their lamps, and went out to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. Those who were foolish, when they took their lamps, took no oil with them, but the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps. Now while the bridegroom delayed, they all slumbered and slept. But at midnight there was a cry, "Behold! The bridegroom is coming! Come out to meet him!" Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps. The foolish said to the wise, "Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out." But the wise answered, saying, "What if there isn't enough for us and you? You go rather to those who sell, and buy for yourselves." While they went away to buy, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went in with him to the marriage feast, and the door was shut. Afterward the other virgins also came, saying, "Lord, Lord, open to us." But he answered, "Most certainly I tell you, I don't know you." Watch therefore, for you don't know the day nor the hour in which the Son of Man is coming.'

November 23 2012

02mydafsoup-01
yt-playlist


Georg Friedrich Händel (1685-1759)

Neun deutsche Arien - Nine German Arias

Lyrics from: Barthold Heinrich Brockes (1680-1747)

Lyrics in German and English: see pdf at pp 16-17 or via links given in the song index at the  bottom.


[...]

Handel's "nine German arias" (he wrote other arias in German, but this is a discrete group) were written in the mid-1720s, long after the composer left his native Germany for Italy and then booming Great Britain. It is not known why he should have written music in German at that late date, and the pieces have a quietly contented tone that sets them somewhat apart from almost everything else in Handel's oeuvre. The texts are by Hamburg poet Barthold Heinrich Brockes, whose so-called Brockes-Passion had already been set by Handel a decade earlier. They are religious but not exactly sacred -- spiritual in a personal way, perhaps, with a good deal of nature imagery that is only lightly reflected in the music. Instead Handel sticks to the da capo aria pattern, forging a gentle language for the soprano soloist that evokes the outlines of the Italian operatic aria but tones the whole thing down to chamber dimensions.

[...]

cited from answers.com




*Neun deutsche Arien (Nine German arias)







St. Cecilia's Day - 22nd of November
- Catholic Encyclopedia
- Wikipedia


November 18 2012

02mydafsoup-01
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Heinrich Schütz. Musikalische Exequien - YouTube

Veröffentlicht am 29.03.2012 von Alberto Sosa

Heinrich Schütz. Musikalische Exequien op. 7, SWV 279 - 281

1.- Concierto en forma de misa de funeral alemán
2.- Motete: Herr, wenn ich nur Dich habe
3.- Canticum Simeonis: Herr, nun lässest Du Deinen Diener

La Chapelle Royale
Philippe Herreweghe

August 27 2012

02mydafsoup-01

How we made: Peter Sellars and William Christie on Theodora

The team behind Glyndebourne's landmark production of Handel's oratorio recall an emotional high

Peter Sellars, director

I had heard Lorraine Hunt singing Theodora in a concert performance, and was overwhelmed by the drama and sheer beauty of Handel's music. The story is basic tabloid fare, and Handel treats it almost entirely as interior drama. [An oratorio in three acts, it concerns the Christian martyrdom of Theodora and her Roman lover Didymus.] When Glyndebourne asked me where they should begin with staging Handel, it was easy. At that time, people didn't quite know what Theodora was: we were in a secret cathedral, discovering a masterpiece the world did not know.

The staging flowed in an extremely organic way. Visionary works such as this wait for another era in which they are allowed to speak in their own language and not have to ventriloquise the conventional wisdom of the day. A lot of it was done as in medieval or byzantine art – as simply as possible: the emotional and spiritual aura of each character was what we were concerned with.

The work is a soundtrack for two people leaving this world that is as chilling as anything Handel ever wrote. A lot of opera focuses on execution. It's a huge question: when we take people's lives as a society; when and how we justify killing. In the US, execution had been illegal for a period and then [in 1976] the Supreme Court decision turned it around. It was decided that lethal injection was "humane", but it was hidden away. I thought it was important to see what the process was. We investigated and were incredibly literal, down to the timing.

The effect was profound. During most performances, people had to be carried from the auditorium; there were emergency medical services standing by. I am not proud of putting people into an emergency medical van, of course, but I do think that's why the Greeks invented theatre: to put these things in front of citizens and say, how do we feel about them?

There was an incredible rehearsal where we ran the first act for the first time in the darkened theatre, and the piece just rose up, like some majestic host and said, "I'm here." We were weeping, holding each other, truly overwhelmed. The production remains a high point of all our lives.

William Christie, conductor

Glyndebourne's general manager had asked if there was a Handel piece I would like to do. They had never staged anything of his there before. I wanted an oratorio, something that would use Glyndebourne's chorus, rather than an opera – and Theodora had stuck in my mind as incredibly moving. He said: "That's curious, the fellow we've asked to direct said the exact same thing!"

I had not met Peter before although of course I knew of him: he's a fellow of great notoriety, in the best sense of the word. You knew that he wasn't going to give you anything other than a controversial, or at least a very personal, sense of the drama. The fact that this Christian woman and her converted lover find themselves on a gurney in a Texas military hospital awaiting execution was incredibly shocking, but I found it horribly moving. We were talking about martyrdom, a word that's existed as long as humans have. Peter was hellbent on making a political statement, registering his dismay and revulsion about aspects of America, but also making music that was written several hundreds of years ago more relevant.

The starting point of any successful lyric piece is giving the singers a long leash. I gave space to them as well as to the music. We had so many happy moments in the casting. I wanted desperately to have Lorraine Hunt: the role of [Theodora's friend] Irene is strong and forthright, as Lorraine was as a singer and a human being. Richard Croft [as Didymus's friend Septimus] was also someone I particularly wanted; there is great honesty in the way he sings.

It's an incredibly emotional piece. We were all caught up in it. I remember Lorraine not being able to mark in rehearsals [sing in a way that rested her voice]. She'd be singing full voice at 11am.

• A DVD of the production is available from glyndebourne.com


guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

------------------------------------

// oAnth - a yt-playlist with a chronological  sequence of excerpts taken from  Peter Sellars' production of Händel's Theodora (demanding!) is available on soup.io here.



April 07 2012

02mydafsoup-01
Georg Friedrich Händel (1685-1759)

yt-playlist

Excerpts from the Sacred Oratorio Theodora

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment
Conductor: William CHRISTIE
Director: Peter SELLARS
Singers / soloists: Frode OLSEN, David DANIELS, Richard CROFT, Dawn UPSHAW, Lorraine HUNT LIEBERSON;

Production for GLYNDEBOURNE 1996 

complete libretto

January 31 2012

Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism

Some of the iconic winter landscapes by Pieter Bruegel the Elder are more than just fine examples of sixteenth-century Dutch art. Paintings such as Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow (1565) also serve as vivid evidence for the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period of cold climate conditions and glacier advances in Europe and elsewhere that lasted from the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century.

There has been quite some debate over the years about the precise onset and the physical causes of this extended cold spell, with one school of thought favouring low solar activity during the ‘Maunder Minimum’ and another the cooling effect of big volcanic eruptions.

A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters may put the solar-trigger hypothesis at rest. Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado in Boulder and his colleagues suggest that the Little Ice Age began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 AD following four large sulfur-rich explosive eruptions, most likely in the tropics, over a mere 50-year period.

Sulfate particles hurled high up into the atmosphere by the massive eruptions would have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the ground and caused a series of cold summers. The found that ice-growth records from Baffin Island and Iceland indicate that glaciers and Arctic sea ice did advance abruptly at the time.  The resulting climate feedbacks seem to have maintained cold conditions for centuries.

“What is new in this study is that the authors have data on the growth of small icecaps in Canada and Iceland, showing a rapid increase in ice volume at the end of the thirteenth and close to the middle of the fifteenth century,” says Georg Feulner, a climate scientist at the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research in Germany.

“These periods coincide with phases of strong volcanic eruptions, but a mechanism is required to produce cooling on longer timescales as the temperature drop after volcanic eruptions typically last only for a few years. In climate model simulations, the authors find that the persistent cooling observed in the climate records can be explained by expanded sea ice resulting in cooling by the ice-albedo feedback mechanism, and cooling in large parts of the North Atlantic by sea-ice export from the Arctic.”

Over at the New York Times DotEarth blog, Jennifer Francis, a climate and sea-ice researcher at Rutgers University in New Jersey, comments on the importance of the findings:

During the past several decades we have seen the enhanced warming of the Arctic owing to a variety of feedbacks involving snow, sea ice, and water vapor, but Arctic Amplification also works in the reverse direction, as in the case of the little ice age.

If a similar series of strong volcanic eruptions were to happen in the next few decades, we would likely experience global cooling with an amplified response at high latitudes. As long as greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, however, the cooling can only be temporary.

Reposted fromSigalontech Sigalontech

January 08 2012

02mydafsoup-01

November 19 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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J. H. Schmelzer-Sonata III in G minor

Uploaded by evoimeneovde on Jul 24, 2010

// Johann Heinrich Schmelzer (c.1620--23 -- between 29 February and 20 March 1680) was an Austrian composer and violinist of the Baroque era. Almost nothing is known about his early years, but he seems to have arrived in Vienna during the 1630s, and remained composer and musician at the Habsburg court for the rest of his life. He enjoyed a close relationship with Emperor Leopold I, was ennobled by him, and rose to the rank of Kapellmeister in 1679. He died during a plague epidemic only months after getting the position.

Schmelzer was one the most important violinists of the period, and an important influence on later German and Austrian composers for violin. He made substantial contributions to the development of violin technique and promoted the use and development of sonata and suite forms in Austria and South Germany. He was the leading Austrian composer of his generation, and an influence on Heinrich Ignaz Biber.
Schmelzer was born in Scheibbs, Lower Austria. Nothing is known about his early years, and most of the surviving information about his background was recounted by the composer himself in his petition for ennoblement of 1673. He described his father as a soldier, but in another document, the 1645 marriage certificate of Schmelzer's sister Eva Rosina, he is listed as a baker. Schmelzer does not mention his father's name, but Eva Rosina's marriage certificate does: Daniel Schmelzer. At any rate, it remains unclear where and from whom Schmelzer received primary music education. His activities before 1643 are similarly unknown--the composer is first mentioned in a document dated 28 June 1643, relating to his first marriage. He is referred to as a cornettist at St. Stephen's Cathedral (Stephansdom), Vienna. The date of his arrival to Vienna is unknown, but he probably worked at the court chapel in late 1630s, in the employ of Ferdinand II and, after 1637, Ferdinand III. Schmelzer's colleagues at the chapel included such distinguished composers as Johann Jakob Froberger, Giovanni Valentini, and Antonio Bertali.

Schmelzer was officially appointed court violinist in 1649. Our knowledge of his position, duties, and activities is incomplete. He apparently rose to prominence as a violin virtuoso, as well as a composer, and enjoyed a close relationship with Emperor Leopold I, who was a well-known patron of the arts and a composer himself. Schmelzer started publishing his music in 1659. He was appointed vice-Kapellmeister on 13 April 1671. On 14 June 1673, after the composer petitioned for ennoblement, the Emperor raised Schmelzer to the ranks of nobility; Schmelzer now added von Ehrenruef to his name. Eventually, after his predecessor Giovanni Felice Sances had died, Schmelzer became Kapellmeister, on 1 October 1679. Unfortunately, he fell victim of the plague early in 1680, and died in Prague, where the Viennese court moved in an attempt to evade the epidemic.
Schmelzer attained a high reputation in a field (violin playing and violin composition) which at the time was dominated by Italians; indeed, one traveler referred to him in 1660 as "nearly the most eminent violinist in all of Europe". Schmelzer's Sonatae unarum fidium of 1664 was the first collection of sonatas for violin and basso continuo to be published by a German-speaking composer. It contains the brilliant virtuosity, sectional structure, and lengthy ground-bass variations typical of the mid-baroque violin sonata.

Schmelzer was the foremost Austrian composer of instrumental music of his day, and had an important influence on the Austrian violinist and composer Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber (1644-1704), who is believed to have been one of Schmelzer's students.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Heinrich_Schmelzer //



quote from the text to the video

-----------------------------------------------

there are no indications concerning the interprets - IMO it should be Music of the Spheres - read here more about the ensemble via https://magnatune.com/artists/spheres (the linked recordings have in the online version spoken adds during and between the diverse music pieces & movements).



November 14 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725) & Francesco Durante (1684-1755)

2 Concerti (F. Durante) and 1 Motet (A. Scarlatti - Lauda Jerusalem - Psalm 147 [paraphrase])
youtube playlist (~30 min)

November 11 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Marin Marais (1656-1728) - Sonnerie de Ste. Genevieve du Mont de Paris (1723) - 

Uploaded by theprof1958 on Dec 25, 2009

Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks, viola da gamba (in the picture)
Pieter Jan Belder, clavicembalo
Rémy Baudet, violino

more from the same cellist
http://magnatune.com/artists/albums/meulenbroeks-marais/

------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marin_Marais

Marin Marais (31 May 1656, Paris -- 15 August 1728, Paris) was a French composer and viol player. He studied composition with Jean-Baptiste Lully, often conducting his operas, and with master of the bass viol Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe for 6 months. He was hired as a musician in 1676 to the royal court of Versailles. He did quite well as court musician, and in 1679 was appointed "ordinaire de la chambre du roy pour la viole", a title he kept until 1725.


He was a master of the basse de viol, and the leading French composer of music for the instrument. He wrote five books of Pièces de viole (1686-1725) for the instrument, generally suites with basso continuo. These were quite popular in the court, and for these he was remembered in later years as he who "founded and firmly established the empire of the viol" (Hubert Le Blanc, 1740). His other works include a book of Pièces en trio (1692) and four operas (1693-1709), Alcyone (1706) being noted for its tempest scene.

Titon du Tillet included Marais in Le Parnasse françois, making the following comments on two of his pieces:
" A piece from his fourth book entitled The Labyrinth, which passes through various keys, strikes various dissonances and notes the uncertainty of a man caught in a labyrinth through serious and then quick passages; he comes out of it happily and finishes with a gracious and natural chaconne. But he surprised musical connoisseurs even more successfully with his pieces called La Gamme [The Scale], which is a piece de symphonie that imperceptibly ascends the steps of the octave; one then descends, thereby going through harmonious songs and melodious tones, the various sounds of music. "

As with Sainte-Colombe, little of Marin Marais' personal life is known after he reached adulthood. Marin Marais married a Parisian, Catherine d'Amicourt, on September 21, 1676. They had 19 children together.

Facsimiles of all five books of Marais' Pièces de viole are published by Éditions J.M. Fuzeau. A complete critical edition of his instrumental works in seven volumes, edited by John Hsu, is published by Broude Brothers. Marais is credited with being one of the earliest composers of program music.[1] His work The Gallbladder Operation, for viola da gamba and harpsichord, includes composer's annotations such as "The patient is bound with silken cords" and "He screameth."[1]





November 07 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Passacaglia by Alessandro Piccinini 1566-1638

yt-video uploaded by BaroqueMusicOnly on Dec 21, 2010

// Alessandro Piccinini (December 30, 1566 -- ca. 1638), was an Italian lutenist and composer.

Piccinini was born in Bologna into a musical family: his father Leonardo Maria Piccinini taught lute playing to Alessandro as well as his brothers Girolamo (d. 1615) and Filippo (d. 1648). He held appointments at the Este court in Ferrara (from 1582 to 1597) and with Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, papal legate at Bologna and Ferrara. Piccinini died around 1638, probably in Bologna.

He is best known for his two volumes of lute music: Intavolatura di Liuto et di Chitarrone, libro primo (Bologna, 1623) and Intavolaturo di Liuto (Bologna, 1639), the latter published posthumusly by his son Leonardo Maria Piccinini. The 1623 collection is of particular importance because of Piccinini's lengthy preface, which includes a detailed manual on performance, as well as claims to have invented the archlute (Piccinini also made important modifications to the chitarrone). Piccinini concentrated on toccatas, courantes and galliards, as well as different kinds of variations. No other works by Piccinini are known; his music for La selva sin amor, the first opera performed in Spain, composed by his brother Filippo Piccinini is lost.

Passacaglias for lute have been composed by figures such as Alessandro Piccinini, G. H. Kapsberger, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Esaias Reusner, Count Logy, Robert de Visée, Jacob Bittner, Philipp Franz Lesage De Richee, Gleitsmann, Dufaut, Gallot, Denis Gaultier, Ennemond Gaultier, and Roman Turovsky-Savchuk, a passacaglia for bandura by Julian Kytasty, and for baroque guitar by Paulo Galvão, Santiago de Murcia, Francisco Guerau, Gaspar Sanz, and Marcello Vitale. //

quote from the yt-video text

September 22 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Where shall I seek.. Acis&Galatea Händel. David Hernandez

yt - permalink
yt account: davidoski001

David Hernandez, tenor
Dario Moreno, dir.
British Baroque Orchestra

---------------------------------------

Acis

Where shall I seek the charming fair?
Direct the way, kind genius of the mountains!
O tell me, if you saw my dear!
Seeks she the grove, or bathes in crystal fountains?
Where. . . da capo

---------------------------------------------

Händel scores to download

complete libretto

---------------------------------------------

A recording from 1959 of 'Acis and Galatea' is bundled with this video via tag, here.

(this aria besides 2 others is missing in the historical recording from 1959 - LP length optimum was about 70 min)


September 17 2011

02mydafsoup-01
yt-playlist


Georg Friedrich Händel

ACIS AND GALATEA
(c. 1718)

A Serenata; or Pastoral Entertainment

Words by John Gay, Alexander Pope and John Hughes


Galatea (soprano)

Acis (tenor)

Damon (tenor)

Polyphemus (bass)

Chorus of Shepherds and Shepherdesses

---------------------------------------------

Händel scores to download

complete libretto

---------------------------------------------

Performer:  Dame Joan SutherlandOwen BranniganPeter PearsDavid Galliver
Conductor:  Sir Adrian Boult
Orchestra/Ensemble:  St. Anthony SingersPhilomusica of London -  1959

about this recording


September 14 2011

02mydafsoup-01
James Kibbie - Bach Organ Works

Free downloads of the complete organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach, recorded by Dr. James Kibbie on original baroque organs in Germany, are offered on this site.

Click Familiar Masterworks to begin with a selection of audience favorites.

Click Catalog for a list of all works.

Click Search to find a specific work, collection or venue.

Click Download in Groups to download multiple works with a single click.

This project is sponsored by the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance with generous support from Dr. Barbara Furin Sloat in honor of J. Barry Sloat. Additional support has been provided by the Office of Vice-President for Research, the University of Michigan.

On-site recording: Christian Cerny, Leipzig, Germany
Editing and mastering: David Lau, Brookwood Studio, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA


scores / Noten to download via
http://www.bh2000.net/score/orgbach/

Reposted bynydivorcelawyer nydivorcelawyer

September 02 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Dietrich Buxtehude  - Chamber Music (~52 min)


yt permalink
yt account: TheGravicembalo2

-------------------------------------------

Dieterich Buxtehude  [WP - EN] (German pronunciation: [ˈdiːtəʁɪç bʊkstəˈhuːdə], also Dietrich; Danish Diderich [ˈdidəʁɪk buksdəˈhuːðə], equivalent to the modern Diderik) c. 1637-1639 - May 1707


-------------------------------------

of the International Dieterich Buxtehude Society

Documents         go to Music>>

The Buxtehude-Werkverzeichnis (List of Works), updated 2010
open as a PDF file>>
open as a Word-Document>>

The Buxtehude Bibliography, updated August 2010 by Sylvia Budde-Manhart (Lübeck)
open as a PDF file>>
open as a Word-Document>>

------------------------------------------------

June 19 2011

May 25 2011

02mydafsoup-01
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Georg Friedrich Händel: Agrippina - Aria: Ogni Vento

Youtube permalink
yt-account: elias12186

George Frederick Handel (Composer),
Jeanne Lamon (Conductor),
Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra (Orchestra),
Karina Gauvin (Performer)

------------------------------------------------

libretto via
http://www.opera-guide.ch/opera.php?id=142


Atto Secondo
SCENA XXI°

Aria

AGRIPPINA
Ogni vento ch’al porto lo spinga,
benché fiero minacci tempeste,
l’ampie vele gli spande il nocchier.
Regni il figlio, mia sola lusinga,
sian le stelle in aspetto funeste,
senza pena le guarda il pensier.

------------------------------------------

AGRIPPINA
Für jeden Wind, der ihn in den Hafen bringt,
auch wenn wilde Stürme drohen,
setzt der Seemann volle Segel.
Dass der Sohn herrsche, ist mein einziger Wunsch.
Mögen die Sterne auch dunkel sein,
der Geist betrachtet sie doch ohne Sorge.

------------------------------------------

Google translation in EN

Wherefore the harbor every wind push it,
although fierce storms threaten,
the wide spreads the pilot's wings.
Kingdoms son, my only lure,
are the stars look dire,
worth the watch without thinking

May 16 2011

02mydafsoup-01
via Theatinerkirche https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/de/wiki/Theatinerkirche_(München)

Blick in die Kuppel der Theatiner-Kirche am Odeonsplatz in München
View in the cupola of the Theatines Church in Munich 

April 27 2011

02mydafsoup-01

April 20 2011

02mydafsoup-01
Georg Friedrich Händel
JEPHTHA
(1752)

An Oratorio; or Sacred Drama
Words by Thomas Morell

Video playlist in 12 parts from yt-account: 400KJV


(no information about this interpretation is available - it seems to be recorded in the late 50ies - may be that David Willcocks is the conductor. )


The interpretation as such is imho inspite of the relative weak recording quality stunning - thanks to Youtube its the first time I have had the chance to listen to it.


The libretto may be followed on the video screen. The complete libretto is available on opera.stanford.edu .
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