Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

March 28 2012

02mydafsoup-01
Play fullscreen
Dizzy Gillespie on the Bahá'í Faith | berfrois.com

yt-permalink
Reposted bymartineatsiranelection

January 27 2012

02mydafsoup-01
[...]

Mathew D. Rose: Mit der R rot-grünen Regierung wurde der Korporatismus in der Bundesrepublik aufgegeben. Diesen Korporatismus will ich keinesfalls verklären, doch mit ihm wurde nach einem gesellschaftlichen Konsens gesucht, auch wenn die Interessen der Wirtschaft meist bevorzugt wurden. Mit der Kommerzialisierung der Demokratie unter Rot-Grün bekam der Höchstbietende den politischen Vorrang - und zwar er allein. Dann gab es zum Beispiel die Liberalisierung der Finanzmärkte, die Riester-Rente und Hartz IV ohne Mindestlohn. Unter der gegenwärtigen Bundesregierung kamen der zeitweise Ausstieg aus dem Atom-Ausstieg und die Reduzierung der Mehrwertsteuer für das Hotelgewerbe dazu. Alle Parteien wandelten Partikularinteressen in Gesetze um und behaupteten, dass das alternativlos war

[...]
"Die Parteien sind Konzerne geworden" | Telepolis 2012-01-27
Reposted byeat-slowkissalonecomplexFrauJulepowerToThePoeplegregoaregenmaedchen

January 26 2012

The back of Berlusconi: Is this the end of populism in Europe?

Luigi Guiso, Helios Herrera, Massimo Morelli, 25 January 2012

What good might come from Europe’s crisis? Profligate governments in Italy and Greece, while pandering to the masses, have left their countries with crippling debt. This column draws parallels with Latin America and argues that the current hardship may sound a death knell for populism in southern Europe, as it has elsewhere.

Full Article: The back of Berlusconi: Is this the end of populism in Europe?

----------------
 
// oAnth - IMHO extremely weak, but an outstanding example, how to miss a good chance to characterise the turn from media orientated populism  to media orientated strict authoritarianism.
Reposted from02myEcon-01 02myEcon-01

October 03 2011

02mydafsoup-01

The Shock of Victory by David Graeber | theanarchistlibrary.org 2007


The biggest problem facing direct action movements is that we don’t know how to handle victory.

This might seem an odd thing to say because of a lot of us haven’t been feeling particularly victorious of late. Most anarchists today feel the global justice movement was kind of a blip: inspiring, certainly, while it lasted, but not a movement that succeeded either in putting down lasting organizational roots or transforming the contours of power in the world. The anti-war movement was even more frustrating, since anarchists and anarchist tactics were largely marginalized. The war will end, of course, but that’s just because wars always do. No one is feeling they contributed much to it.

I want to suggest an alternative interpretation. Let me lay out three initial propositions here:

  1. Odd though it may seem, the ruling classes live in fear of us. They appear to still be haunted by the possibility that, if average Americans really get wind of what they’re up to, they might all end up hanging from trees. It know it seems implausible but it’s hard to come up with any other explanation for the way they go into panic mode the moment there is any sign of mass mobilization, and especially mass direct action, and usually try to distract attention by starting some kind of war.

  2. In a way this panic is justified. Mass direct action — especially when organized on democratic lines — is incredibly effective. Over the last thirty years in America, there have been only two instances of mass action of this sort: the anti-nuclear movement in the late ‘70s, and the so called “anti-globalization” movement from roughly 1999-2001. In each case, the movement’s main political goals were reached far more quickly than almost anyone involved imagined possible.

  3. The real problem such movements face is that they always get taken by surprise by the speed of their initial success. We are never prepared for victory. It throws us into confusion. We start fighting each other. The ratcheting of repression and appeals to nationalism that inevitably accompanies some new round of war mobilization then plays into the hands of authoritarians on every side of the political spectrum. As a result, by the time the full impact of our initial victory becomes clear, we’re usually too busy feeling like failures to even notice it.

Let me take the two most prominent examples case by case:

[...]

-------------------------

oAnth:

this entry is part of the OccupyWallStreet compilation 2011-09/10, here.

August 20 2011

02mydafsoup-01

3sat.Mediathek - Video: Ende einer Supermacht - Der Putsch gegen Gorbatschow (19/08/11)

Ende einer Supermacht - Der Putsch gegen Gorbatschow

Die Welt hält am 19. August 1991 den Atem an: Panzer in Moskau. Kommunistische Hardliner haben Gorbatschow an seinem Urlaubsort festgesetzt. Der Westen befürchtet die Wiedergeburt des Kalten Kriegs.


Other entries to the 20th anniversary of the End of the Soviet Union on soup.io - oAnth - you find here


August 18 2011

02mydafsoup-01
[...]

In the West, the failure of the putsch is still considered to be the heroic victory of Boris Yeltsin and the Russian people over the last guard of the Soviet evil empire in the West. And there is no question that the coup touched off the peaceful collapse of one of the most heavily armed superpowers in the history of the world.  It also signalled the end of the Cold War and a period of US hyperpower status. But triumph of good over evil?  Well...

The Russian people certainly do not think so. A recent poll in Russia by the Levada center (July 15-19, 2011) reveals that an increasing number of Russians now view the failure of the August coup as "tragic news having disastrous consequences for the country." (up to 39% from 36% last year). The majority of others surveyed saw the coup as simply "a struggle for power at the highest levels of Russian government." Only 10% see the news as a victory for democratic revolution. 

As we approach the 20th anniversary of the Putsch, how should we understand these poll numbers?  Would the coup plotters have instigated the same reforms as Yeltsin and the other republic leaders?  Would they have spared Russia and the other Soviet republics the hyperflation and turmoil of the 1990s?

[...]


----------------------------------------------

You find other entries in occasion of the 20th anniversary from the End of the Soviet Union on, here.
Putin Watcher: 20 Years Since the Fatal Blow to the Soviet Union | 2011-08-16
Reposted bycheg00 cheg00

August 17 2011

March 04 2011

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl