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May 01 2011

02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01

New FBI Documents Provide Details on Government’s Surveillance Spyware | Electronic Frontier Foundation 2011-04-29

EFF recently received documents from the FBI that reveal details about the depth of the agency's electronic surveillance capabilities and call into question the FBI's controversial effort to push Congress to expand the Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) for greater access to communications data. The documents we received were sent to us in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request we filed back in 2007 after Wired reported on evidence that the FBI was able to use “secret spyware” to track the source of e-mailed bomb threats against a Washington state high school. The documents discuss a tool called a "web bug" or a "Computer and Internet Protocol Address Verifier" (CIPAV),1 which seems to have been in use since at least 2001.2

What is CIPAV and How Does It Work?
The documents discuss technology that, when installed on a target's computer, allows the FBI to collect the following information:

  • IP Address
  • Media Access Control (MAC) address
  • "Browser environment variables"
  • Open communication ports
  • List of the programs running
  • Operating system type, version, and serial number
  • Browser type and version
  • Language encoding
  • The URL that the target computer was previously connected to
  • Registered computer name
  • Registered company name
  • Currently logged in user name
  • Other information that would assist with "identifying computer users, computer software installed, [and] computer hardware installed"3

It's not clear from the documents how the FBI deploys the spyware, though Wired has reported that, in the Washington state case, the FBI may have sent a URL via MySpace's internal messaging, pointing to code that would install the spyware by exploiting a vulnerability in the user's browser. Although the documents discuss some problems with installing the tool in some cases, other documents note that the agency's Crypto Unit only needs 24-48 hours to prepare deployment.4 And once the tool is deployed, "it stay[s] persistent on the compromised computer and . . . every time the computer connects to the Internet, [FBI] will capture the information associated with the PRTT [Pen Register/Trap & Trace Order].

[...]

02mydafsoup-01
Ars Technica locked out of #Facebook account due to infringement complaint. Community policing is prone to abuse. https://eff.org/r.47u

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// by arstechnica.com - started by 2011-04-29 with several updates:

Facebook shoots first, ignores questions later; account lock-out attack works (Update X)

Twitter / EFF: Ars Technica locked out of ... | 2011-05-01

David Harvey - Nice day for a revolution: Why May Day should be a date to stand up and change the system | World Politics, World - The Independent - 2011-04-29

[...]

While decolonisation throughout the rest of the world proceeded apace, the spread and, in some cases, imposition of economic development projects brought much of the globe into a tense relation with capitalist forms of development and underdevelopment (prompting a wave of revolutionary movements in the late 1960s into the 1970s, from Portugal to Mozambique). These movements were resolutely resisted, undermined and eventually rolled back through a combination of local elite power supported by US covert actions, coups and co-optations.

The crisis years of the 1970s forged another radical paradigm shift in economic thinking: neoliberalism came to town. There were frontal attacks on organised labour accompanied by a savage politics of wage repression. State involvement in the economy (particularly with respect to welfare provision and labour law) were radically rethought by Reagan and Thatcher. There were huge concessions to big capital and the result was that the rich got vastly richer and the poor relatively poorer. But, interestingly, aggregate growth rates remained low even as the consolidation of plutocratic power proceeded apace.

An entirely different world then emerged, totally hostile to organised labour and resting more and more on precarious, temporary and dis- organised labour spread-eagled across the earth. The proletariat became increasingly feminine.

The crisis of 2007-9 sparked a brief global attempt to stabilise the world's financial system using Keynesian tools. But after that the world split into two camps: one, based in North America and Europe, sees the crisis as an opportunity to complete the end-game of a vicious neoliberal project of class domination: the other cultivates Keynesian nostalgia, as if the postwar growth history of the United States can be repeated in China and in other emerging markets.

The Chinese, blessed with huge foreign exchange reserves, launched a vast stimulus programme building infrastructures, whole new cities and productive capacities to absorb labour and compensate for the crash of export markets. The state-controlled banks lent furiously to innumerable local projects. The growth rate surged to above 10 per cent and millions were put back to work. This was followed by a tepid attempt to put in motion the other pinion of a Keynesian programme: raising wages and social expenditures to bolster the internal market.

China's growth has had spillover effects. Raw material suppliers, such as Australia and Chile and much of the rest of Latin America have resumed strong growth.

The problems that attach to such a Keynesian programme are well-known. Asset bubbles, particularly in the "hot" property market in China, are forming all over the place and inflation is accelerating in classic fashion to suggest a different kind of crisis may be imminent. But also the environmental consequences are generally acknowledged, even by the Chinese government, to be disastrous, while labour and social unrest is escalating.

China contrasts markedly with the politics of austerity being visited upon the populations of North America and Europe. The neoliberal formula established in the Mexican debt crisis of 1982, is here being repeated. When the US Treasury and the IMF ...

[...]

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April 30 2011

02mydafsoup-01
02mydafsoup-01
Sixteen principles of open government: http://bit.ly/jTRssI #tcamp11

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// cited from related blog entry:

Sixteen principles of open government



At Transparency Camp 2011, James Tauber of GovTrack laid out sixteen principles of open government. They are:

  1. Information is not meaningfully public if it is not available on the Internet for free.
  2. Primary data is data as collected at the source, with the finest possible level of granularity, not in aggregate or modified forms.
  3. Data are made available as quickly as necessary to preserve the value of the data.
  4. Data are available to the widest range of users for the widest range of purposes.
  5. Data are reasonably structured to allow automated processing.
  6. Data are available to anyone, with no requirement of registration.
  7. Data are available in a format over which no entity has exclusive control.
  8. Dissemination of the data is not limited by intellectual property law such as copyright, patents, or trademarks, contractual terms, or other arbitrary restrictions.
  9. Data should be made available at a stable Internet location indefinitely.
  10. Data published by the government should be in formats and approaches that promote analysis and reuse of that data.
  11. Government bodies publishing data online should always seek to publish using data formats that do not include executable content.
  12. Published content should be digitally signed or include attestation of publication/creation date, authenticity, and integrity.
  13. The public is in the best position to determine what information technologies will be best suited for the applications the public intends to create for itself.
  14. Have a process for ensuring that data you disclose are accurate and reliable, and show that process to users.
  15. To the extent two data sets refer to the same kinds of things, the creators of the data sets should strive to make them interoperable.
  16. Other things being equal, technological choices should be avoided that essentially endorse a single profit-making entity.

More here.

Twitter / Joey Mornin: Sixteen principles of open ... | 2011-04-30
02mydafsoup-01

Johann Hari: The British Royal Wedding Frenzy Should Embarrass Us All (Democracy Now!) Part 1 of 2

DemocracyNow.org - Up to two billion people around the world tuned in to watch the British royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, a story which has dominated TV news for weeks. The wedding buzz, however, provides an interesting time to look at the monarchy, Britain's domestic policy, and how its colonial legacy around the word affects foreign affairs today. While all eyes were on the wedding procession and the first kiss, Democracy Now! talked instead with Johann Hari, a columnist at The Independent of London, who says that royal wedding frenzy should be an embarrassment to us all. Watch Part 2: www.youtube.com For the video/audio podcast, transcript, to sign up for the daily news digest, and for our complete news archive, visit www.democracynow.org Read Johann Hari's article in The Independent of London www.johannhari.com FOLLOW US: Facebook: www.facebook.com Twitter: @democracynow Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today, visit www.democracynow.org
Views: 190
19 ratings
Time: 13:42 More in News & Politics
Reposted fromVideosDemocracy VideosDemocracy

Johann Hari: The British Royal Wedding Frenzy Should Embarrass Us All (Democracy Now!) Part 2 of 2

DemocracyNow.org - Up to two billion people around the world tuned in to watch the British royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, a story which has dominated TV news for weeks. The wedding buzz, however, provides an interesting time to look at the monarchy, Britain's domestic policy, and how its colonial legacy around the word affects foreign affairs today. While all eyes were on the wedding procession and the first kiss, Democracy Now! talked instead with Johann Hari, a columnist at The Independent of London, who says that royal wedding frenzy should be an embarrassment to us all. Watch Part 1: www.youtube.com For the video/audio podcast, transcript, to sign up for the daily news digest, and for our complete news archive, visit www.democracynow.org Read Johann Hari's article in The Independent of London www.johannhari.com FOLLOW US: Facebook: www.facebook.com Twitter: @democracynow Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today, visit www.democracynow.org
Views: 166
4 ratings
Time: 08:08 More in News & Politics
Reposted fromVideosDemocracy VideosDemocracy
02mydafsoup-01
Nice day for a revolution: Why May Day should be a date to stand up and change the system http://ind.pn/iqQs4j #mayday

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// a greater excerpt of the article is also available on soup.io - permalink

  
Twitter / David Harvey: Nice day for a revolution: ... | 2011-04-29
It’s no coincidence that as genuine social mobility in broken Britain is eroded, so commoners turn to the National Lottery, The X Factor and Britain’s Got Talent. Winning them represents the only chance real people have to change their circumstances significantly. It could be you. And, like some giant illuminated penis flying over the rooftops of suburban homes and frothing at random passing women, William has pointed himself at Kate Middleton, the Susan Boyle of social mobility. In declaring her his princess, he brings hope of real change to millions of people denied a decent education and the means to better themselves, to millions of tiny babies denied even books, that one day they too could be randomly rewarded with untold wealth and privilege.
Stewart Lee
Reposted fromjhnbrssndn jhnbrssndn
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April 29 2011

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Allen Ruff: Democratic party leaders pushed movement away from mass action to an exclusively electoral strategy

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