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April 30 2011

02mydafsoup-01

[...]

Yesterday however may have marked a bell weather moment for Facebook and its willingness to compromise users, their privacy and their ability to freely associate and organise. As Guy Aitchison put it,


Profiles are being deleted without warning or explanation. In the last 12 hours, Facebook has deleted over 50 sites. It may well be that these groups are technically in violation of Facebook’s terms of agreement, which state that participants in social media must not make use of a "fake name". But the timing – on the royal wedding and May day weekend – is deeply suspicious. We don’t know for certain, but this purge of online organising groups could be linked to the wider crackdown on protest by authorities in Britain. Either way, it is a scandalous abuse of power by Facebook to arbitrarily destroy online communities built up over many months and years. These groups provide a vital means for activist groups to communicate with their supporters.

   

While these profiles were technically in breach of terms of use, only British anti-cuts profiles were taken down during the 12 hour period. This all being within the broader context of an offline repression of dissent that involved dozens of ‘pre-emptive’ arrests on charges as Kafkaesque as ‘Conspiracy to cause a public nuisance’. There were also raids on squats in London, Bristol and Brighton, heavy handed policing of public assemblies in Glasgow and Bristol and nearly a hundred more arrests on the day itself in and around central London for crimes such as having placards in bags and potentially offending royalist and homophobic sensibilities.

It appears that Facebook may have had contact with elements within the British establishment, be it the Home Office or the London Met. Given that these profiles could have been pulled on a technicality anyway, Facebook may have been quite willing to collaborate in shutting down these accounts, denying activist groups the ability to quickly organise around an event the authorities were determined to see pass off without the slightest possibility of protests or disruption.

[...]

The Facebook Purge: Corporate power, political influence and the need for alternative networks | openDemocracy - 2011-04-30
02mydafsoup-01

Tag a wall for Wikileaks | WikiStencil 2010-12-08

Tag a wall for Wikileaks

Posted on December 8, 2010 by anonymous

Now that Julian Assange is in jail and and Wikileaks has been shut down out of the streets it is time to get the word out.  We have created a simple stencil kit for you to download, remix, and do what you will.

If you have made a better design that you want to share please feel free to send it to us and we will upload for all to download.  We believe in a free internet and free stencils!

Have fun, don’t get into too much trouble , and give them hell.

Free assange       Free assange         Free assange
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Reposted bywikileaks wikileaks

5 Years After U.S.-Backed Clashes, Palestinian Factions Fatah, Hamas Reach Unity Deal

Hamasfatah

The rival Palestinian political organizations, Fatah and Hamas, have reached an agreement to end a nearly five-year internal schism, form an interim government, and hold a general election within a year. The two sides have been locked in a bitter conflict since Fatah and the Bush administration tried to overthrow Gaza’s Hamas-led government in 2006 after Hamas won Palestinian national elections. Israel and the United States say they’ll reject any peace talks with a Palestinian government that includes Hamas. We speak with Saree Makdisi, professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA and the author of several books, including Palestine Inside Out: An Everyday Occupation. [includes rush transcript]

Reposted fromsigalondemnow sigalondemnow

April 29 2011

02mydafsoup-01
6416 175f

thedailywhat:

Messy Protest of the Day: A naked member of the activist group Liberate Tate lies on the floor of Tate’s classical sculpture exhibit room drenched in an oil-like substance to protest Tate’s ongoing partnership with BP.

The protest, which took place yesterday to mark the one-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion, lasted 87 minutes — one for every day oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

[animalny.]

Reposted fromjhnbrssndn jhnbrssndn
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