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June 14 2018

Trinidad and Tobago's religious leaders ‘unite to divide’ people around the issue of gay rights

"Doing what you can to reduce murder, child abuse, domestic violence...nah, more important to use your leadership position to say who should or shouldn't be allowed to love each other"

June 13 2018

Deutsche Dichterhalle

Autor: Blumenthal, Oscar [Mitwirkender]
Erschienen 1877
BSB-Signatur P.o.germ. 274 fi-6

URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb11359663-4
URL: http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs1/object/display/bsb11359663_00001.html/

Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Lessing's Werke

Autor: Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim
Erschienen [1877]
BSB-Signatur P.o.germ. 840 d-13,2

URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb11359793-1
URL: http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs1/object/display/bsb11359793_00001.html/

Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Madeline’s Madeline (Josephine Decker)

MADELINE’S MADELINE is amazing, disturbing, and ultimately both exhilarating and devastating. It is Josephine Decker’s greatest film to date. The film is so experimental/abstract, yet at the same time so visceral/intense, that I don’t really know how to talk about it. I am trying to give my impressions, but everything I say may well be entirely misguided and beside the point.

Decker invents (especially here, though it was already present in her previous films) an entirely new formal language, to express an entirely new sort of subjectivity, here embodied in her teenaged protagonist Madeline (the utterly brilliant an remarkable Helena Howard). Shallow focus, often fuzzy, roving camera, strange angles, strange edits, soundtrack interpolations (including both heavy breathing sounds and the amazing music of Caroline Shaw) – even to the extent that I can describe them, I cannot explain how they add up to something both entirely fresh and greater than the sum of its parts.

The movie is about acting (including its own) and the mystique of improv theater (something I am not very enamoured of in other contexts, or perhaps due to my own ignorance; but it is overwhelming here). At their highest point, intense inner feeling and its completely fictive simulation become indistinguishable, and that is what happens here in the course of a teenage girl’s relation with her two mother figures (one the biological and legal mother, played surprisingly against type by the great Miranda July, the other the mother substitute that the head of the improv troupe becomes, played by Molly Parker).

The film recounts incidents, rather than anything that is shaped like a conventional narrative, but it builds to a completely logical and shattering climax – which then in turn transmutes into something vivid and powerful but also dreamlike and almost ungraspable (theater returning to its roots in Dionysian ritual? I am grasping at straws here).

One could say that MADELINE’S MADELINE is deconstructing oppositions between real life and theater, or between authenticity and performance, or whatever – or even between human and animal, since the film features repeating exercises in which the actors try to channel animals, especially cats – there are pig masks as well, not to mention may closeups of actual cats – and in fact the film begins with a warning, delivered to us in extreme closeup, about the nuances of identification and possession (it is only a metaphor, you are not really the cat, you are IN the cat) –
I could say all that, and it would be sort of true, but it is totally inadequate as a description of the movie, because MADELINE’S MADELINE is not just a deconstruction of identities and oppositions, but a positive expression of some new sort of identity (which is female, and biracial, and other things, but isn’t ONLY all that) that we don’t have words for yet. Which is why I will not be able to shake the memory of this film (and will have to watch it again, a number of times) (all this I felt more obscurely already in the case of BUTTER ON THE LATCH, but here it is magnitudes more powerful and more perplexing).

(originally posted on Facebook, but I think it is important enough to also post here)

Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Aufbrüche und Katastrophen

Daniel Schönpflug über die Schicksalsjahre zwischen 1918 und 1923
Rezension von Jens Flemming zu
Daniel Schönpflug: Kometenjahre. 1918. Die Welt im Aufbruch
S. Fischer Verlag, Frankfurt a. M. 2017
Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Wohltuende Rückkehr zum Analogen

Ein surrealer Blick auf die Generation Smartphone von Lorenz Pauli
Rezension von Anne Amend-Söchting zu
Lorenz Pauli: Oje, ein Buch!
atlantis – orrell füssli verlag, Zürich 2018
Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Vom Papier erzählen

Neil Holt, Nicola von Velsen und Stephanie Jacobs haben gemeinsam einen Band über Material, Medium und Faszination des Werkstoffs herausgegeben
Rezension von Gabriele Wix zu
Neil Holt; Nicola von Velsen; Stephanie Jacobs (Hg.): Papier. Material, Medium und Faszination
Prestel Verlag, München 2018
Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Visualizing Dante’s Hell: See Maps & Drawings of Dante’s Inferno from the Renaissance Through Today

The light was departing. The brown air drew down
     all the earth’s creatures, calling them to rest
     from their day-roving, as I, one man alone,

prepared myself to face the double war
     of the journey and the pity, which memory
     shall here set down, nor hesitate, nor err.

Reading Dante’s Inferno, and Divine Comedy generally, can seem a daunting task, what with the book’s wealth of allusion to 14th century Florentine politics and medieval Catholic theology. Much depends upon a good translation. Maybe it’s fitting that the proverb about translators as traitors comes from Italian. The first Dante that came may way—the unabridged Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed English translation—renders the poet’s terza rima in leaden prose, which may well be a literary betrayal.

Gone is the rhyme scheme, self-contained stanzas, and poetic compression, replaced by wordiness, antiquated diction, and needless density. I labored through the text and did not much enjoy it. I’m far from an expert by any stretch, but was much relieved to later discover John Ciardi’s more faithful English rendering, which immediately impresses upon the senses and the memory, as in the description above in the first stanzas of Canto II.

The sole advantage, perhaps, of the translation I first encountered lies in its use of illustrations, maps, and diagrams. While readers can follow the poem’s vivid action without visual aids, these lend to the text a kind of imaginative materiality: saying yes, of course, this is a real place—see, it’s right here! We can suspend our disbelief, perhaps, in Catholic doctrine and, doubly, in Dante’s weirdly officious, comically bureaucratic, scheme of hell.

Indeed, readers of Dante have been inspired to map his Inferno for almost as long as they have been inspired to translate it into other languages—and we might consider these maps more-or-less-faithful visual translations of the Inferno’s descriptions. One of the first maps of Dante’s hell (top) appeared in Sandro Botticelli’s series of ninety illustrations, which the Renaissance great and fellow Florentine made on commission for Lorenzo de’Medici in the 1480s and 90s.

Botticelli’s “Chart of Hell,” writes Deborah Parker, “has long been lauded as one of the most compelling visual representations… a panoptic display of the descent made by Dante and Virgil through the ‘abysmal valley of pain.’” Below it, we see one of Antonio Manetti’s 1506 woodcut illustrations, a series of cross-sections and detailed views. Maps continued to proliferate: see printmaker Antonio Maretti’s 1529 diagram further up, Joannes Stradanus’ 1587 version, above, and, below, a 1612 illustration below by Jacques Callot.

Dante’s hell lends itself to any number of visual treatments, from the purely schematic to the broadly imaginative and interpretive. Michelangelo Caetani’s 1855 cross-section chart, below, lacks the illustrative detail of other maps, but its use of color and highly organized labeling system makes it far more legible that Callot’s beautiful but busy drawing above.

Though we are within our rights as readers to see Dante’s hell as purely metaphorical, there are historical reasons beyond religious belief for why more literal maps became popular in the 15th century, “including,” writes Atlas Obscura, “the general popularity of cartography at the time and the Renaissance obsession with proportions and measurement.”

Even after hundreds of years of cultural shifts and upheavals, the Inferno and its humorous and horrific scenes of torture still retain a fascination for modern readers and for illustrators like Daniel Heald, whose 1994 map, above, while lacking Botticelli’s gilded brilliance, presents us with a clear visual guide through that perplexing valley of pain, which remains—in the right translation or, doubtless, in its original language—a pleasure for readers who are willing to descend into its circular depths. Or, short of that, we can take a digital train and escalators into an 8-bit video game version.

See more maps of Dante’s Inferno here, here, and here.

via Atlas Obscura

Related Content:

Artists Illustrate Dante’s Divine Comedy Through the Ages: Doré, Blake, Botticelli, Mœbius & More

Hear Dante’s Inferno Read Aloud by Influential Poet & Translator John Ciardi (1954)

Robert Rauschenberg’s 34 Illustrations of Dante’s Inferno (1958-60)

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

Visualizing Dante’s Hell: See Maps & Drawings of Dante’s <i>Inferno</i> from the Renaissance Through Today is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Immer bleiben die Toten unter uns

Der niederländische Schriftsteller Cees Nooteboom hat einen Gedichtband veröffentlicht, der auf schönste Weise das Gespräch mit den Verstorbenen fortführt.
Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01

Der neue italienische Kulturminister Alberto Bonisoli steht dem Management näher als der Kunst

Die Koalition von Cinque Stelle und Lega versteht die Kultur als Wirtschaftsfaktor. Das lässt manche Schlimmes fürchten, andere immerhin hoffen.
Reposted from02myhumsci-01 02myhumsci-01
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