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White House proposes sweeping federal IT reforms

For years, the differences between the use of information technology in the public and private sector have been glaring. Closing the technology gap has been one of the most important priorities of the administration's IT executives. Today, the White House released a report (below) that acknowledges those issues and proposes specific reforms to begin to address the IT gap that Peter Orzag, the former head of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the White House, highlighted this summer.

This morning in Washington, the White House will host a forum on information technology management reform hosted by federal chief performance officer and OMB deputy director for management Jeffrey Zients and U.S. chief information officer Vivek Kundra. The two will lay out the Obama administration's strategy to reboot how the federal government purchases and uses information technology. The event will be streamed live at whitehouse.gov/live. It's also embedded below:

Key reforms proposed in the plan include:

  • Create career tracks for IT program managers
  • Move to pilot projects with more budget flexibility and greater transparency in the implementation process
  • Develop IT acquisition specialists to closely align acquisition with technology cycles in the broader economy
  • Following the model of Social Security, enact the requirement for complete, integrated teams to be in place before projects are approved
  • Launch "myth-busting" campaigns about acquisition of federal IT.
  • Use "TechStat" sessions and other accountability measures to end or accelerate troubled projects
  • Reduce the number of federal data centers by at least 40 percent by 2015.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl