Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

September 19 2019

Cooling Earth with asteroid dust, and 3 billion missing birds

On this week’s show, science journalist Josh Sokol talks about a global cooling event sparked by space dust that lead to a huge shift in animal and plant diversity 466 million years ago. (Read the related research article in Science Advances.) And I talk with Kenneth Rosenberg, an applied conservation scientist at Cornell University, about steep declines in bird abundance in the United States and Canada. His team estimates about 3 billion birds have gone missing since the 1970s. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; KiwiCo.com Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

September 12 2019

Studying human health at 5100 meters, and playing hide and seek with rats

In La Rinconada, Peru, a town 5100 meters up in the Peruvian Andes, residents get by breathing air with 50% less oxygen than at sea level. International News Editor Martin Enserink visited the site with researchers studying chronic mountain sickness—when the body makes excess red blood cells in an effort to cope with oxygen deprivation—in these extreme conditions. Martin talks with host Sarah Crespi about how understanding why this illness occurs in some people and not others could help the residents of La Rinconada and the 140 million people worldwide living above 2500 meters. Read the whole special issue on mountains.  Sarah also talks with Annika Stefanie Reinhold about her work at the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience in Berlin training rats to play hide and seek. Surprisingly, rats learned the game easily and were even able to switch roles—sometimes playing as the seeker, other times the hider. Annika talks with Sarah about why studying play behavior in animals is important for understanding the connections between play and learning in both rats and humans. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; Kroger’s Zero Hunger, Zero Waste campaign Download a transcript (PDF)  Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Tambako The Jaguar/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

September 05 2019

Searching for a lost Maya city, and measuring the information density of language

This week’s show starts with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade, who spent 12 days with archaeologists searching for a lost Maya city in the Chiapas wilderness in Mexico. She talks with host Sarah Crespi about how you lose a city—and how you might go about finding one. And Sarah talks with Christophe Coupé, an associate professor in the department of linguistics at the University of Hong Kong in China, about the information density of different languages. His work, published this week in Science Advances, suggests very different languages—from Chinese to Japanese to English and French—are all equally efficient at conveying information. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this week’s show: Kroger’s Zero Hunger, Zero Waste campaign; KiwiCo Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast  

August 29 2019

Where our microbiome came from, and how our farming and hunting ancestors transformed the world

Micro-organisms live inside everything from the human gut to coral—but where do they come from? Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the first comprehensive survey of microbes in Hawaii’s Waimea Valley, which revealed that plants and animals get their unique microbiomes from organisms below them in the food chain or the wider environment. Going global, Meagan then speaks with Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about a project that aggregated the expertise of more than 250 archaeologists to map human land use over the past 10,000 years. This detailed map will help fine-tune climate models. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this show: Science Sessions Podcast; Kroger Download a transcript (PDF)  Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Chris Couderc/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

August 22 2019

Promising approaches in suicide prevention, and how to retreat from climate change

Changing the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline from 1-800-273- 8255 (TALK) to a three-digit number could save lives—especially when coupled with other strategies. Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Greg Miller, a science journalist based in Portland, Oregon, about three effective methods to prevent suicides—crisis hotlines, standardizing mental health care, and restricting lethal means. Greg’s feature is part of a larger package in Science exploring paths out of darkness. With more solutions this week, host Sarah Crespi speaks with A. R. Siders, a social scientist at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, about her policy forum on the need for “managed climate retreat”—strategically moving people and property away from high-risk flood and fire zones. Integrating relocation into a larger strategy could maximize its benefits, supporting equality and economic development along the way. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this show: KiwiCo; Kroger Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Scott Woods-Fehr/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 

August 15 2019

One million ways to sex a chicken egg, and how plastic finds its way to Arctic ice

Researchers, regulators, and the chicken industry are all united in their search for a way to make eggs more ethical by stopping culling—the killing of male chicks born to laying hens. Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel talks with host Sarah Crespi about the many approaches being tried to determine the sex of chicken embryos before they hatch, from robots with lasers, to MRIs, to artificial intelligence, to gene editing with CRISPR. Also this week, Sarah talks with Melanie Bergmann, a marine biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, about finding microplastic particles in snow all the way up at the Fram Strait, between Greenland and the Svalbarg archipelago in Norway. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Download a transcript (PDF) Ads on this week’s show: Science Sessions podcast; National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: fruchtzwerg’s world/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

August 08 2019

Next-generation cellphone signals could interfere with weather forecasts, and monitoring smoke from wildfires to model nuclear winter

In recent months, telecommunications companies in the United States have purchased a new part of the spectrum for use in 5G cellphone networks. Weather forecasters are concerned that these powerful signals could swamp out weaker signals from water vapor—which are in a nearby band and important for weather prediction. Freelance science writer Gabriel Popkin joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the possible impact of cellphone signals on weather forecasting and some suggested regulations. In other weather news this week, Sarah talks with Pengfei Yu, a professor at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China, about his group’s work using a huge smoke plume from the 2017 wildfires in western Canada as a model for smoke from nuclear bombs. They found the wildfire smoke lofted itself 23 kilometers into the stratosphere, spread across the Northern Hemisphere, and took 8 months to dissipate, which line up with models of nuclear winter and suggests these fires can help predict the results of a nuclear war. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this week’s show: KiwiCo.com Download the transcript (PDF)  Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast

August 01 2019

Earthquakes caused by too much water extraction, and a dog cancer that has lived for millennia

After two mysterious earthquake swarms occurred under the Sea of Galilee, researchers found a relationship between these small quakes and the excessive extraction of groundwater. Science journalist Michael Price talks with host Sarah Crespi about making this connection and what it means for water-deprived fault areas like the Sea of Galilee and the state of California. Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Adrian Baez-Ortega from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom’s Transmissible Cancer Group about the genome of a canine venereal cancer that has been leaping from dog to dog for about 8000 years. By comparing the genomes of this cancer from dogs around the globe, the researchers were able to learn more about its origins and spread around the world. They also discuss how such a long-lived cancer might help them better understand and treat human cancers. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on this week’s show: Science Sessions podcast from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Download the transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast

July 25 2019

Breeding better bees, and training artificial intelligence on emotional imagery

Imagine having a rat clinging to your back, sucking out your fat stores. That’s similar to what infested bees endure when the Varroa destructor mite comes calling. Some bees fight back, wiggling, scratching, and biting until the mites depart for friendlier backs. Now, researchers, professional beekeepers, and hobbyists are working on ways to breed into bees these mite-defeating behaviors to rid them of these damaging pests. Host Sarah Crespi and Staff Writer Erik Stokstad discuss the tactics of, and the hurdles to, pesticide-free mite control. Also this week, Sarah talks to Philip Kragel of the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder about training an artificial intelligence on emotionally charged images. The ultimate aim of this research: to understand how the human visual system is involved in processing emotion. And in books, Kate Eichorn, author of The End of Forgetting: Growing Up with Social Media, joins books host Kiki Sanford to talk about how the monetization of digital information has led to the ease of social media sharing and posting for kids and adults. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Download a transcript (PDF)  Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Steve Baker/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

July 18 2019

Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors, and the secret to dark liquid dances

Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors? Studies of behavior and biomarkers have suggested the stress of harsh conditions or family separations can be passed down, even beyond one’s children. Journalist Andrew Curry joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a possible mechanism for this mode of inheritance and mouse studies that suggest possible ways to reverse the effects. Spiky, pulsating ferrofluids are perpetual YouTube stars. The secret to these dark liquid dances is the manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles in the liquid by external magnets. But when those outside forces are removed, the dance ends. Now, researchers writing in Science have created permanently magnetic fluids that respond to other magnets, electricity, and pH by changing shape, moving, and—yes—probably even dancing. Sarah Crespi talks to Thomas Russell of the University of Massachusetts in Amherst about the about the applications of these squishy, responsive magnets. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast

July 11 2019

The point of pointing, and using seabirds to track ocean health

You can learn a lot about ocean health from seabirds. For example, breeding failures among certain birds have been linked to the later collapse of some fisheries. Enriqueta Velarde of the Institute of Marine Sciences and Fisheries at the University of Veracruz in Xalapa, Mexico, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what these long-lived fliers can tell us about the ocean and its inhabitants. Also this week, Sarah and Cathal O’Madagain of the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris discuss pointing—a universal human gesture common to almost all children before age 1. They discuss why pointing matters, and how this simple gesture may underlie humans’ amazing ability to collaborate and coordinate. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: Kiwico.com Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: C. O’Madagain et al., Science Advances 2019; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

July 04 2019

Converting carbon dioxide into gasoline, and ‘autofocal’ glasses with lenses that change shape on the fly

Chemists have long known how to convert carbon dioxide into fuels—but up until now, such processes have been too expensive for commercial use. Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about using new filters and catalysts to close the gap between air-derived and fossil-derived gasoline.   Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Nitish Padmanaban of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, about replacing bifocals with “autofocals.” These auto-focusing glasses track your eye position and measure the distance to the visual target before adjusting the thickness of their liquid lenses. The prototype glasses have an onboard camera and batteries that make them particularly bulky; however, they still outperformed progressive lenses in tests of focus speed and acuity. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.   Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts.   About the Science Podcast  

June 27 2019

Creating chimeras for organ transplants and how bats switch between their eyes and ears on the wing

Researchers have been making animal embryos from two different species, so-called “chimeras,” for years, by introducing stem cells from one species into a very early embryo of another species. The ultimate goal is to coax the foreign cells into forming an organ for transplantation. But questions abound: Can evolutionarily distant animals, like pigs and humans, be mixed together to produce such organs? Or could species closely related to us, like chimps and macaques, stand in for tests with human cells? Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the research, the regulations, and the growing ethical debate. Also this week, Sarah talks with Yossi Yovel of the School of Zoology and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University in Israel about his work on sensory integration in bats. Writing in Science Advances, he and his colleagues show through several clever experiments when bats switch between echolocation and vision. Yossi and Sarah discuss how these trade-offs in bats can inform larger questions about our own perception. For our monthly books segment, Science books editor Valerie Thompson talks with Lucy Jones of the Seismological Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena about a song she created, based on 130 years of temperature data, for an instrument called the “viola de gamba.” Read more on the Books et al. blog. Download a transcript (PDF) This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: MagellanTV; KiwiCo Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: The Legend Kay/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

June 20 2019

The why of puppy dog eyes, and measuring honesty on a global scale

How can you resist puppy dog eyes? This sweet, soulful look might very well have been bred into canines by their intended victims—humans. Online News Editor David Grimm talks with host Meagan Cantwell about a new study on the evolution of this endearing facial maneuver. David also talks about what diseased dog spines can tell us about early domestication—were these marks of hard work or a gentler old age for our doggy domestics? Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Michel Marechal of the University of Zurich in Switzerland about honesty around the globe. By tracking about 17,000 wallets left at hotels, post offices, and banks, his team found that we humans are a lot more honest than either economic models or our own intuitions give us credit for. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: MagellanTV Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Molly Marshall/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

June 14 2019

Better hurricane forecasts and spotting salts on Jupiter’s moon Europa

We’ve all seen images or animations of hurricanes that color code the wind speeds inside the whirling mass—but it turns out we can do a better job measuring these winds and, as a result, better predict the path of the storm. Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how a microsatellite-based project for measuring hurricane wind speeds is showing signs of success—despite unexpected obstacles from the U.S. military’s tweaking of GPS signals.    Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Samantha Trumbo, a Ph.D. candidate in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, about spotting chloride salts on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. What can these salts on the surface tell us about the oceans that lie beneath Europa’s icy crust? Download a transcript (PDF)  This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: KiwiCo.com; MagellanTV Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Reposted fromscience science

June 13 2019

Better hurricane forecasts and spotting salts on Jupiter’s moon Europa

We’ve all seen images or animations of hurricanes that color code the wind speeds inside the whirling mass—but it turns out we can do a better job measuring these winds and, as a result, better predict the path of the storm. Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how a microsatellite-based project for measuring hurricane wind speeds is showing signs of success—despite unexpected obstacles from the U.S. military’s tweaking of GPS signals.    Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Samantha Trumbo, a Ph.D. candidate in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, about spotting chloride salts on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. What can these salts on the surface tell us about the oceans that lie beneath Europa’s icy crust? Download a transcript (PDF)  This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: KiwiCo.com; MagellanTV Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

June 06 2019

The limits on human endurance, and a new type of LED

Cheap and easy to make, perovskite minerals have become the wonder material of solar energy. Now, scientists are turning from using perovskites to capture light to using them to emit it. Staff Writer Robert Service joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about using these minerals in all kinds of light-emitting diodes, from cellphones to flat screen TVs. Read the related paper in Science Advances. Also this week, Sarah talks with Caitlin Thurber, a biologist at Nassau Community College in Garden City, New York, about a hard limit on human endurance. Her group used data from transcontinental racers—who ran 957 kilometers over the course of 20 weeks—and found that after about 100 days, their metabolism settled in at about 2.5 times the baseline rate, suggesting a hard limit on human endurance at long timescales. Earlier studies based on the 23-day Tour de France found much higher levels of energy expenditure, in the four- to five-times-baseline range. Download a transcript (PDF) This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads on the show: KiwiCo.com Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: N. Zhou et al., Science Advances 2019; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

June 01 2019

Aktuelles zur Gelbwestenbewegung

In sozialrevolutionären Kreisen werden die derzeitigen Riots in Frankreich vermehrt diskutiert. Die Translib Leipzig (die einige vorläufige Gedanken zu den Gelbwesten und eine deutsche Übersetzung der 42 Forderungen derselben auf ihrem Blog veröffentlicht) hat einige Debattenbeiträge in Form einer Linksammlung zusammengestellt. 2 1/2 Beiträge in hörbarer Form dokumentieren wir hier:

1.) Weihnachten wird nicht stattfinden

Weihnachten wird nicht stattfinden“ war der Titel einer Diskussionsveranstaltung, die kurz vor dem Jahreswechsel in der Translib stattgefunden hat. Marius, der an der Organisierung der Veranstaltung beteiligt war, hat im Vorfeld für Radio Corax ein paar Überlegungen angestellt:

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 42 MB; 18:32 min)

In aller Kürze ordnet das Corax-Gespräch die Gelbwesten-Bewegung in die jüngere Protestgeschichte Frankreichs ein und versucht den sozialen und politischen Charakter der Bewegung zu bestimmen. Es geht dabei auch um die Beteiligung rechter Gruppierungen. Was hier nur angeschnitten wird, wurde dann bei den Referaten in der Translib ausgeführt: Beschreibungen der Akteure und des Geschehens, Deutungsversuche der Symbole, Analysen der Forderungen und materialistische Erklärungsansätze der Bewegung. Dabei geht es auch um Debatten innerhalb der französischen radikalen Linken, unter anderem der Appelisten (Unstichtbares Komitee, der kommende Aufstand). Nachzuhören ist dies auf Youtube und hier:

    Download: via AArchiv (mp3; 104 MB; 1:21:27 h)

2.) Noch einmal zur Gelbwestenbewegung

Ein Gespräch mit ähnlich gelagerter Ausrichtung hat Radio Corax in der ersten Januarwoche gesendet. Auch hier geht es um eine historische Verortung, um die soziale Lage in Frankreich, um politische und soziale Zusammensetzung wie um die Beschränkung der Bewegung. Das Gespräch ist gegenüber den oben dokumentierten Aufnahmen in besserer Qualität.

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 52 MB; 33:16 min)
Tags: Der kommende Aufstand, Frankreich, Gelbwesten, Gilets Jaunes, Klassenkampf, Protestbewegung, Radio Corax, Unsichtbares Komitee
Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

Material zu Herbert Marcuse

Wir stellen hier mehrere Beiträge zusammen, die sich mit dem Leben und Denken von Herbert Marcuse auseinandersetzen. Dies durchaus passend zur gerade Laufenden Beitragsserie über 1968 – hat doch Herbert Marcuse als engagierter Intellektueller wie kaum ein anderer eine Verbindung zwischen der Erfahrung der Novemberrevolution und den Impulsen der Bewegung der 60er Jahre hergestellt.

1.) Leben und Werk Herbert Marcuses

Aus Anlass des 118. Geburtstags von Herbert Marcuse hat Radio Corax im Juli 2016 ein Interview mit Roger Behrens geführt. Ausgehend von der Politisierung Marcuses im Zuge des 1. Weltkriegs geht das Gespräch einigen biographischen Stationen Marcuses nach, um anhand dessen immer wieder Aspekte seines Denkens zu skizzieren.

Einer, der an der Novemberrevolution teilgenommen hat, der bei Heidegger Philosophie gelernt hat, um dann Marx zu entdecken, ein wichtiger Theoretiker des Freudo-Marxismus zu werden und der dann später Stichwortgeber der amerikanischen Studentenbewegung geworden ist – der wurde am 19. Juli 1898, also heute vor 118 Jahren in Berlin geboren und er hieß Herbert Marcuse. Er zählt zu den wichtigen Vertretern der kritischen Theorie – auch wenn er nicht wie Adorno und Horkheimer nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg nach Deutschland zurückgekehrt ist. Wir haben den 118. Geburtstag von Herbert Marcuse zum Anlass genommen, um über sein Leben und sein Denken zu sprechen. Dazu haben wir mit Roger Behrens telefoniert. Begonnen haben wir bei einer Station im Leben von Herbert Marcuse, die eine ganze Generation einschneidend geprägt hat – der erste Weltkrieg. Marcuse war jemand, der ziemlich nah dran war an der Novemberrevolution – das heißt bei Marcuse hat der erste Weltkrieg eine Politisierung nach links bedeutet. Wir haben Roger Behrens gefragt, wie diese Politisierung auch die Entwicklung des Denkens von Marcuse beeinflusst hat. [via]

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 54 MB; 39:40 min)

2.) Kapitalismus und Opposition – Vorlesungen zum eindimensionalen Menschen

Unter dem Titel „Kapitalismus und Opposition“ sind im Herbst 2017 eine Reihe von Vorlesungen veröffentlicht worden, die Herbert Marcuse 1974 an der Universität Vincennes gehalten hat. Die Vorlesungen aktualisieren und konkretisieren Aspekte der Überlegungen, die Marcuse im „Eindimensionalen Menschen“ angestellt hat und entfalten zentrale Motive, die sich durch das Werk Marcuses durchziehen. Herausgegeben wurden diese Vorlesungen von Peter-Erwin Jansen, Lisa Doppler und Alexander Neupert-Doppler. Peter-Erwin Jansen ist der Nachlassverwalter Marcuses. Radia Obscura hat ein Interview mit ihm über Marcuse und das neu erschienene Buch geführt.

2017 ist unter dem Titel „Kapitalismus und Opposition“ ein etwa 150-seitiger Band beim zuKlampen!-Verlag erschienen, in dem die Herausgeber*innen Lisa Doppler, Peter-Erwin Jansen und Alexander Neupert-Doppler in erster Linie eine Vorlesungsreihe abdrucken, die Herbert Marcuse 1974 an der Pariser Universität Vincennes abhielt. Marcuse nimmt darin am Beispiel der USA eine Analyse des Kapitalismus seiner Zeit vor, diagnostiziert einen Konsumkapitalismus und wägt Möglichkeiten seiner Überwindung ab. Ergänzt werden diese Vorlesungen u.a. um eine Einleitung durch Roger Behrens und ein Interview, das Le Monde mit Marcuse führte. Wir hatten die Gelegenheit, Peter-Erwin Jansen, Philosoph und Vorstand der Internationalen Marcuse Gesellschaft (IMS), zu dieser Publikation zu befragen und eine historische und theoretische Einordnung vorzunehmen bzw. vornehmen zu lassen. [via]

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 80 MB; 35:09 min)

3.) Buchvorstellung: Kapitalismus und Opposition

Am 15.03.2019 haben Lisa Doppler und Alexander Neupert-Doppler das Buch Kapitalismus und Opposition. Vorlesungen zum eindimensionalen Menschen in der „Neuen Republik Reger“ in Berlin vorgestellt. Sie geben im Vortrag einen kurzen Überblick über Leben und Werk von Marcuse, um dann folgende Aspekte zu diskutieren: Die Frage nach dem sozialen Ort der Revolution angesichts der Verschiebungen innerhalb der globalen Arbeitsteilung; die Kritik liberaler Ideologie und des autoritären Charakters; die Frage der Opposition im integrierten Kapitalismus. Dabei beschränkt sich der Vortrag nicht auf eine Wiedergabe der Vorlesungen Marcuses, sondern sie versuchen stets einen Bezug zu aktuellen Problemen der Gesellschaftskritik herzustellen.

Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) wurde vor 50 Jahren berühmt als angeblicher Kopf der Protestwelle von 1968, der er 1969 seine Schrift ‚Versuch über die Befreiung‘ widmete. Die Revolte und deren Reflexion blieben, wie in Marcuses Titel angedeutet, leider ein Versuch. Auch heute noch leben wir im Kapitalismus, wenn auch in anderer Gestalt, auch heute noch gibt es Opposition. Erst durch dieses Fortdauern werden alte Texte interessant und aktuell.

1974 hielt Marcuse sieben Vorlesungen an der Universität Sorbonne in Paris. In erster Linie kritisierte er, als Praktiker der Theorie, bestimmte Entwicklungen im Kapitalismus. Er ging auf die Tendenz zum Monopolkapitalismus ein, die sogenannte postindustrielle Gesellschaft, auf Neoimperialismus, Konsumkapitalismus und den scheinbaren Zerfall alter Autoritäten. Aber auch die Chance der Opposition, zwischen Revolte und Integration, wird diskutiert.

2017 wurden diese Pariser Vorlesungen im zuKlampen-Verlag in deutscher Übersetzung herausgegeben von Peter-Erwin Jansen, Lisa Doppler und Alexander Neupert-Doppler. Freilich nicht aus Nostalgie, welche die größte Feindin der Utopie ist, sondern aus dem Bedürfnis die eigene Situation in ihrem Abstand zu dieser Vergangenheit einzuschätzen. Wie hat sich der Kapitalismus entwickelt? Welche Gelegenheiten findet die Opposition vor?

Lisa Doppler promoviert an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen über Herbert Marcuse und Anknüpfungspunkte für heutige Proteste am Beispiel der Refugeebewegung. Alexander Neupert-Doppler ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am IASS in Potsdam. 2013 erschien sein Buch über politische Widrigkeiten (Staatsfetischismus), 2015 und 2018 Bände über Möglichkeiten (Utopie), ein Buch zum Begriff Gelegenheit (Kairós) ist in Arbeit.

    Download: via AArchiv (mp3; 36.8 MB; 1:07:29 h)

4.) Herbert Marcuse und der OSS

Im US-amerikanischen Exil hat Herbert Marcuse von 1942 bis 1951 für den Office of Strategic Services (OSS), den Nachrichtendienst des Kriegsministeriums, gearbeitet. In diesem Rahmen fertigte er einerseits Studien über den Nationalsozialismus an (später erschienen als „Feindanalysen“), nach dem Krieg aber auch über die Sowjetunion und das Denken des Sowjet-Marxismus. Radio Corax hat zwei Gespräche über diese Tätigkeit Marcuses geführt. Im ersten Gespräch mit Dr. Tim B. Müller vom Hamburger Institut für Sozialforschung (der ein Buch über „Krieger und Gelehrte. Herbert Marcuse und die Denksysteme im Kalten Krieg“ veröffentlicht hat) geht es um die Motivation Marcuses, für den OSS zu arbeiten, um den gesellschaftlich-historischen Kontext, das Verhältnis von Geheimdiensten und Regierung, sowie um die Reaktionen auf Marcuses Tätigkeit für den Geheimdienst.

Herbert Marcuse hat das Denken der Studentenbewegung und der 68er Generation in Deutschland maßgeblich bestimmt und wird sogar manchmal als deren Guru bezeichnet. Seine beiden Werke Triebstruktur und Gesellschaft (1955) und Der eindimensionale Mensch (1964) gehören zu den wichtigsten Büchern der Kritischen Theorie. Um so verblüffender ist es, dass der Held der Außerparlamentarischen Opposition und das geistige Vorbild für radikale Gegner des Kriegs in Vietnam für den US-amerikanischen Geheimdienst gearbeitet hat. Für den Geheimdienst OSS, den Vorgänger der CIA. Wir haben mit dem Historiker Dr. Tim B. Müller vom Hamburger Institut für Sozialforschung gesprochen. Er hat ein Buch geschrieben. „Krieger und Gelehrte. Herbert Marcuse und die Denksysteme im Kalten Krieg“ heißt das. [via]

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 17 MB; 18:56 min)

Im zweiten Gespräch mit Detlev Claussen (der in der TAZ einen Artikel über die kritische Theorie im Dienst des OSS geschrieben hat) geht es um die Arbeitssituation des Insituts für Sozialforschung im Exil, das wechselseitige Interesse der Intelektuellen des IfS und des OSS, die Faschismus-Analyse(n) von Marcuse und die Vorwürfe der Neuen Linken, Marcuse habe sich als Agent des Imperialismus schuldig gemacht.

Herbert Marcuse, Franz Neumann und Otto Kirchheimer haben als Marxisten im Exil in den USA in den 1940′er Jahren für den amerikanischen Geheimdienst gearbeitet. Die Dokumente dieser Tätigkeit sind nun erstmals auf deutsch erschienen. Wir sprachen mit Detlev Claussen darüber, wie es zu dieser Zusammenarbeit kam, welche Erkenntnisse die drei über den Nationalsozialismus hatten und wie der Vorwurf zu bewerten ist, Marcuse wäre ein Agent des US-Imperialismus gewesen. Zuerst beantwortet er die Frage, wie die Arbeitsbedingungen des Instituts für Sozialforschung im Exil gewesen sind. [via]

    Download: via FRN (mp3; 37 MB; 16:12 min)
Tags: Alexander Neupert Doppler, Detlev Claussen, kritische Theorie, Lisa Doppler, Marcuse, Nationalsozialismus, Peter Erwin Jansen, Radia Obscura, Radio Corax, Roger Behrens, Tim B. Müller, USA
Reposted from02mysoup-aa 02mysoup-aa

May 30 2019

Grad schools dropping the GRE requirement and AIs play capture the flag

Up until this year, most U.S. graduate programs in the sciences required the General Record Examination from applicants. But concerns about what the test scores actually say about potential students and the worry that the cost is a barrier to many have led to a rapid and dramatic reduction in the number of programs requiring the test. Science Staff Writer Katie Langin joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about this trend and how it differs across disciplines. Also this week, Sarah talks with DeepMind’s Max Jaderberg in London about training artificial agents to play a video game version of capture the flag. The agents played approximately 4 years’ worth of Quake III Arena and came out better than even expert human players at both cooperating and collaborating, even when their computer-quick reflexes were hampered. And in this month’s book segment, new host Kiki Sanford interviews Marcus Du Satoy about his book The Creativity Code: Art and Innovation in the Age of AI. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Ads this week: KiwiCo.com Download a transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science podcast. [Image: DeepMind; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl